Virtual School Meanderings

December 5, 2022

Partner your vendor services with K12 Academics

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 10:12 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

The second of two items from K12, Inc./Stride Inc. themselves.

We invite you to submit your profile to the School Vendors directory on K12 Academics. The #1 search on Google since 2010.
k12academics

We offer you more than other directory websites or business search engines you may use. We are an online educational community visited by millions each year with personal dedicated services that expand beyond a simple profile listing. We work on your behalf so you don’t have to. For the month of December we are running an end of year special.

k12academics
One Year Account Pricing:
In-State Listing: $250
Regional Listing (2-16 States): $350
National Listing (17 or more States): $599

End of Year Special: Accounts submitted receive +6 months for an 18 month listing period. Special ends 12/31.

 

If you submit an account to K12 Academics, you will receive more than just a profile listing. You will also receive:
1-  A user account you can post articles (press releases, news, etc), lesson plans and/or clinical trials.
2-  Social media promotion of any events/messaging you may have at any time to our 40,000+ followers.
3-  Promotion in our monthly newsletter of 35,000+ subscribers.
4- Promotion of your profile on social media at the time of submission.
5- Network to 100% of the education sector in the U.S.

 

Why use K12 Academics?
1- We are one of the leading websites on the internet for generating new referrals
2- Your listing will generate 10,000 unique visitors, increase your search engine score and improve your social media reputation.
3- We average 500,000 unique visitors, 2,000,000 unique pageviews and 7,000,000 hits per month
https://www.k12academics.com/website-traffic
4- We average an SEO score above 90 and PR above 8. Search engines reward you for listing with us.
5- We offer more than just a profile listing. You can post articles, lesson plans, utilize our social media network, monthly newsletter and have sitewide banners.
Read more of our Benefits, Guarantees and what your account will receive
https://www.k12academics.com/benefits-advertising-k12-academics 
k12academics

Affiliates:

We offer special packages if you want to reach all seven million unique visitors of our website. Email ad@k12academics.com if interested or visit the link below
https://www.k12academics.com/advertise-affiliate-k12-academics

This message was sent to MKBARBOUR@GMAIL.COM by vendor@k12academics.com
PO Box 175, Ambler, PA, 19002

Stride Learning – The Possibilities are Endless with 17th Annual K12 Art Competition

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 8:09 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

The first of two items from K12, Inc./Stride Inc. themselves.

K12 Inc. Logo Learning Company
Stride Learning has added a new press release to its website:

The Possibilities are Endless with 17th Annual K12 Art Competition

Click here for a complete listing of Stride Learning press releases.

 


Date Sent: 12/5/2022 8:30:33 AM

CIDER Session December 7, 2022

Note this interesting event upcoming from the folks at the Canadian Institute for Distance Education Research.

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Hello, CIDER members –

Dear CIDER member, You are invited to our upcoming session of the 2022-23 CIDER Sessions series on Wednesday, December 7, 2022. This free, online session will feature Jeanne Kim from Selkirk College discussing the relationship between Heutagogy and Education 4.0.

The Interconnectivity of Heutagogy and Education 4.0 in Higher Online Education

Jeanne Kim December 7, 2022, 11am MT http://www.cideresearch.ca/session/kim-2022

Industry 4.0 advancements in technology are creating a dynamic and fast changing world that affects how we live and work. Educators need to rethink existing teaching approaches to better prepare students for future careers that Industry 4.0 will create. The World Economic Forum (WEF) defined a new education model, called Education 4.0, which contains eight major changes to redefine learning in the new economy. Heutagogy, or self-determined learning, is an approach that promotes critical thinking, social-emotional skills, and life-long learning. These skills are necessary for Education 4.0. The purpose of this presentation is to examine how Heutagogy in higher online education can meet the needs of Education 4.0. The approach of the study examines existing literature on Education 4.0 and Heutagogy. A conceptual model that interconnects Heutagogy to the learning principles of Education 4.0 will be offered as a key finding to answer the research question: How does Heutagogy in higher online education meet the needs of Education 4.0? The paper provides a base for further research and discussion into how Heutagogy and other approaches can support the needs of Education 4.0 to prepare learners for a changing world. Registration is not required; all are welcome. To join the session, go to: http://www.cideresearch.ca/session/kim-2022

About the 2022-23 CIDER Sessions Series: Call for presenters

The CIDER Sessions are an online, open and free seminar series through which researchers or research groups can present their work to a broad audience of fellow researchers, practitioners, and students from across Canada and around the world. As our 2022-23 season develops, we invite researchers working in distance, distributed, online, or blended education. If you have recent research to share with our CIDER audience, contact dwilton@athabascau.ca with a brief description of your research topic and approximate date when it will be available for presentation. Spots are also available for students nearing completion of their dissertation or thesis. International presenters are welcome; all sessions are held in English.

About CIDER

CIDER is supported by the International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning (IRRODL) and the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Athabasca University: Canada’s Open University and leader in professional online education.

The Sessions and their recordings are open and available to all, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

If you have research you would like to share with our CIDER audience in 2023, please contact us. CIDER Session presentation spots are available for researchers, research-practitioners, and students recently graduated or nearing the culmination of their studies in distance, online, or distributed learning. Please include a brief description of your research and an approximate date when it will be ready for presentation.

CIDER manager: Dan Wilton, dwilton@athabascau.ca
http://www.cideresearch.ca

Our mailing address is:

Athabasca University

Canadian Initiative for Distance Education Research
1200, 10011 – 109 Street

Edmonton, AB T5J 3S8

Canada

Report on school suspensions perpetuates harmful stereotypes

A second “Think Twice” review of a think tank report from the folks at the National Education Policy Center.

Inside Look

Great Lakes Center’s exclusive subscriber email featuring key points, information and social media content about reviews and research

Dec. 1, 2022READ IN BROWSER
Hello, Great Lakes Center subscriber:

After concerns about racial discrimination in school disciplinary policies, Milwaukee Public Schools in 2017 worked with the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights to implement changes combatting racial disparities in discipline, inconsistent use of policies, incomplete documentation and a lack of training on discipline policies.
A report from the Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty (WILL) reports on the results of those changes and suggests a direct connection between school suspension rates and students’ perceptions of safety in Milwaukee schools. WILL authors claim a link between unpunished misconduct in the classroom and disruptive classroom environments, which ultimately harms Black students.

Read on to learn more.

Maddie Fennell

Executive Director
Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice

REPORT REVIEWED

Kathryn E. Wiley and Kate Somerville of the University of Colorado Boulder reviewed “Suspended Reality: The Impact of Suspension Policy on Student Safety.”

WHAT THE REVIEWER FOUND

Wiley and Somerville found various concerns in the report, including unsupported claims, misleading interpretations and the use of racial stereotypes of Black students.

The report claims that after an agreement with the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, lower suspension rates for Black students were associated with higher numbers of students reporting feeling unsafe in school.

Boldly, the report’s authors highlight this correlation in a heading within the report reading, “Reduced Suspension for African American Students Resulted in Lower Reports of Safety.”

The report incorrectly asserts that a drop in the suspensions of Black students causes fewer students to feel safe, leading to the conclusion that the changes implemented harm Black students.
The report argues that instead of helping Black students, the agreement between the Office for Civil Rights and Milwaukee Public Schools instead created schools in which Black students are disrupting class without punishment and that efforts to reduce suspensions are “misguided.”
Wiley and Somerville note the report ignores peer-reviewed research and oversimplifies relevant issues. The report includes another finding that as the suspension rate fell, the percentage of students feeling unsafe in the overall student population also dropped, but interestingly that’s not what the authors focus on.
Because of its flaws, the report’s policy conclusions are not useful to policymakers. Educators and policymakers should continue to use peer-reviewed, evidence-based research on school discipline and racial disparities.
The authors of the review also recommend policymakers consider whether adequate support is in place for schools to implement alternatives to suspensions. They note simply reducing the number of suspensions is not a comprehensive reform.

Read the full review on the Great Lakes Center website or on the National Education Policy Center website.

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE

The issues identified by the Office for Civil Rights aren’t exclusive to Milwaukee Public Schools. Information that reinforces stereotypes about Black students and attempts to call into question measures that could be taken to protect these students and increase equality in the classroom should be scrutinized. Using peer-reviewed, evidence-based research on school discipline would provide a clearer picture of how to serve all students so that every student has equal opportunities to learn at school.

TALKING POINTS TO REMEMBER

  1. A report from the Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty argues changes implemented in Milwaukee Public Schools regarding suspensions are “misguided.”
  1. A review found various concerns in the report, including unsupported claims, misleading interpretations and the use of racial stereotypes of Black students.
  1. Policymakers should not use the policy conclusions of the report, and instead should consider whether adequate support is in place for schools to implement alternatives to suspensions.

SOCIAL SHARES

Want to share this Think Twice Review with your social networks? We drafted some sample social media posts for your use.
A report on #SchoolSuspensions makes unsupported claims that will harm Black students. Read a review of the report: A report on #SchoolSuspensions makes unsupported claims that will harm Black students. Read a review of the report:
A @nepctweet review found unsupported claims and the use of racial stereotypes in a report on #SchoolSuspensions. Read the review: A @nepctweet review found unsupported claims and the use of racial stereotypes in a report on #SchoolSuspensions. Read the review:
Policymakers should investigate if schools have adequate support to implement alternatives to #SchoolSuspensions. Learn more: Policymakers should investigate if schools have adequate support to implement alternatives to #SchoolSuspensions. Learn more:
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Think Twice, a project of the National Education Policy Center, provides the public, policymakers and the press with timely, academically sound reviews of selected publications. The project is made possible by funding from the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice.
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Great Lakes Center for Education Research & Practice
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East Lansing, MI 48826-1263

For-Profit Charter Schools in Ohio Get a Mixed Grade in an Honest Reading of Recent Study

A “Think Twice” review of a think tank report from the folks at the National Education Policy Center.

December 1, 2022

Contact:
Alex Molnar: (480) 797-7261, nepc.molnar@gmail.com
Faith Boninger: (480) 390-6736, fboninger@gmail.com
Joshua Cowen: (517) 355-2215, jcowen@msu.edu

For-Profit Charter Schools in Ohio Get a Mixed Grade in an Honest Reading of Recent Study

An NEPC Review funded by the Great Lakes Center

Key Takeaway: Much of the report’s analysis would be impossible in states with weaker transparency laws, illustrating the necessity for oversight and transparency in all states with charter schools and non-traditionally managed schools supported by taxpayer dollars.

EAST LANSING, MI (December 1, 2022) – A recent report from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute examines academic outcomes in Ohio’s nonprofit and for-profit charter schools. It also explores whether differences in contracted services in for-profits appear to correlate with differences in their outcomes.

Joshua Cowen of Michigan State University reviewed For-Profit Charter Schools: An Evaluation of Their Spending and Outcomes and found a solid study accompanied by unfounded claims about the study’s findings and significance.

The study itself finds that for-profits typically contract for either staffing or other services and that those contracting for staffing perform especially poorly. Overall, it finds Ohio’s charters to perform well, but it finds that for-profit schools perform slightly lower academically than their nonprofit counterparts, and they perform worse than traditional schools in some areas as well.

Based on these findings, the report includes cautions about overregulation of for-profit charters but also raises concerns about virtual charters and charter schools that contract out for nearly all services.

Those are the report’s findings-but the report also includes an enthusiastic Foreword written by Fordham’s leaders (as opposed to the report’s authors). The Foreword departs from the study itself to draw the implication that charter schools should not be regulated “based on the [for-profit] tax status of their management organizations.” In reality, the report includes negative findings such as fewer students in for-profit charters earning diplomas, and it reinforces concerns about for-profit schools—particularly those that contract out for staff.

Professor Cowen also cautions that the report is limited in its focus on only Ohio, which has substantially more transparency than many states require for school choice options. He concludes that its relevance to policymakers is “mainly as a blueprint for the kind of oversight and transparency requirements all states with charter schools should require, and much of the Fordham analysis would be impossible in other states with weaker transparency laws.” As a result, the report offers little to inform policy and practice in dissimilar or nationwide contexts.

“Both the Fordham report and this NEPC review of it speak to the larger issue and indeed the larger problem of privatization in American education,” said Professor Cowen. “Oversight and transparency requirements are enormously important.”

Find the review, by Joshua Cowen, at:
https://greatlakescenter.org

Find For-Profit Charter Schools: An Evaluation of Their Spending and Outcomes, written by Stéphane Lavertu and Long Tran and published by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, at:
https://fordhaminstitute.org/national/research/for-profit-charter-schools-evaluation-spending-outcomes

NEPC Reviews (http://thinktankreview.org) provide the public, policymakers, and the press with timely, academically sound reviews of selected publications. NEPC Reviews are made possible in part by support provided by the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice: https://greatlakescenter.org.

The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), a university research center housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces high-quality information in support of democratic deliberation about education policy. We publish original research, policy briefs, and expert third-party reviews of think tank reports. NEPC publications are written in accessible language and are intended for a broad audience that includes academic experts, policymakers, the media, and the general public. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu

About The Great Lakes Center
The mission of the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice is to support and disseminate high quality research and reviews of research for the purpose of informing education policy and to develop research-based resources for use by those who advocate for education reform. Visit the Great Lakes Center Web Site at: https://www.greatlakescenter.org. Follow us on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/greatlakescent. Find us on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/GreatLakesCenter.

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The mission of the Great Lakes Center for Education Research & Practice is to support and disseminate high quality research and reviews of research for the purpose of informing education policy and to develop research-based resources for use by those who advocate for education reform.

Visit the Great Lakes Center website at https://www.greatlakescenter.org/

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