Virtual School Meanderings

November 8, 2018

Does Public Engagement Really Matter?

From AERA in the past day or two.

View this email in your browser.

American Educational Research Association

Dear Michael Barbour,

Is science communication important? Does public engagement really matter? Should the scientific community do more or less to support these activities? Here’s your chance to be heard.

If you have already completed the survey, THANK YOU! No further action is required.

If not, please help us improve our understanding of scientific communication and public engagement by completing the following 15-minute survey:

https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8A3XPmHeRmGqRaB

The study is covered by the Institutional Review Boards (IRB) of the University of Texas-Austin and Michigan State University. Participation in the survey is voluntary, and all responses are anonymous and confidential. Additional information, including contact information for any questions, is provided in the introduction to the survey at the link above.

The American Educational Research Association is one of thirty professional societies participating in this landmark survey – administered by ScienceCounts and the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science – to assess members’ views on science communication and public engagement. Your responses will help us better serve our members, as well as help shape the trajectory of community-wide science communication and public engagement efforts.

Thank you for generously donating your time to support this important endeavor.

Sincerely,

Felice J. Levine, Ph.D.

Executive Director

American Educational Research Association

American Educational Research Association

1430 K Street, NW

Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20005

(202) 238-3200

www.aera.net

November 2, 2018

AERA Highlights: Richard Milner Delivers 2018 Brown Lecture, AERA Introduces Two New Membership Renewal Options, And More!

A newsletter from yesterday’s inbox.

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October 2018

AERA News

AERA Publications News

Research Policy News

AERA Q&A

AERA New and Extended Calls

AERA Continuing Calls

WERA Call

Beyond AERA

AERA in the News

AERA News

H. Richard Milner IV Delivers 15th Annual Brown Lecture

On October 25, H. Richard Milner IV delivered the 15th Annual BrownLecture, “Disrupting Punitive Practices and Policies: Rac(e)ing Back to Teaching, Teacher Preparation, and Brown,” to a packed house of more than 900 at the Ronald Reagan Building & International Trade Center in Washington, D.C. Read more

AERA Introduces Early Career and Two-Year Membership Renewal Options

AERA is pleased to announce two new options for membership renewal: a discount on regular membership for new doctorate recipients and a two-year membership renewal. Read more

AERA Leadership Convenes for Fall Meeting

AERA leadership gathered in Washington, D.C., October 26–27, for the 2018 Coordinated Committee Meeting. Read more

AERA Partners on Science Communication and Public Engagement Survey

AERA is partnering with 29 other scientific societies on a landmark survey to assess members’ views on science communication and public engagement. Read more

AERA Publications News

Incoming Editors Share Their Vision for EEPA

The incoming editors of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis—Joseph R. Cimpian, Julie Marsh, Paco Martorell, and Morgan Polikoff—have set forth a vision for their term (2019–2021) in their Editors’ Introduction, now available open-access online. Read more

Research Policy News

Legislation Introduced to Address Harassment in Science

On October 5, Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) introduced the Combatting Sexual Harassment in Science Act. Read more

AERA Continues Efforts to Include Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Questions on NSF Surveys

On October 8, AERA joined 17 scientific organizations and higher education groups on a letter urging the National Science Foundation to include measures related to sexual orientation and gender identity on the 2019 Survey of Doctorate Recipients. Read more

Senate Panel Considers Dillingham Nomination for Census Director; Lawsuits Challenging Census Citizenship Question Move Forward

The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs held a confirmation hearing on October 3 to consider Steven Dillingham, the Trump administration’s nominee for Census Bureau director. Read more

NIH Proposes New Requirements for Clinical Trials; Public Comment Period Closes November 12

NIH is currently accepting comments on proposed reporting and registration requirements for “prospective basic science studies involving human participants.” Read more

NSF EHR Advisory Committee Holds First Meeting with New Assistant Director

The National Science Foundation’s Education and Human Resources Advisory Committee held its fall meeting October 17 – 18, its first with the new assistant director for EHR, Karen Marrongelle. Read more

AERA Q&A

NCES Commissioner James “Lynn” Woodworth Discusses Agency Priorities, Challenges, and Opportunities

James “Lynn” Woodworth began his term as commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics at the Institute of Education Sciences in March 2018. The following Q&A is one in an occasional series of conversations with scholars and policy and opinion leaders with an interest in and commitment to education research. Read more

AERA New and Extended Calls

AERA Continuing Calls

WERA Call

Beyond AERA

AERA in the News

Recent media coverage of AERA and AERA-published research

More AERA in the News

AERA Highlights is published by the American Educational Research Association monthly to inform members and others interested in education research about the latest news and developments in AERA and in the field.

Editor: Felice J. Levine

Managing Editors: Tony Pals and John Neikirk

Contributors: Juliane Baron, Nathan Bell, Collin Boylin, Jessica Sibold, Christy Talbot, and Martha Yager

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American Educational Research Association

1430 K Street, NW

Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20005

(202) 238-3200

AERA Statement on the Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting

A statement released earlier today.

For Immediate Release:

November 2, 2018

Contacts:

Tony Pals, tpals@aera.net

(202) 238-3235, (202) 288-9333 (cell)

Collin Boylin, cboylin@aera.net

(202) 238-3233, (860) 490-8326 (cell)

Statement by the American Educational Research Association on the Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting

November 2, 2018

The American Educational Research Association mourns the loss of 11 more people senselessly killed at the hands of bigotry, racism, xenophobia, and antisemitism, the latest in a pattern that has become pervasive in our country. Last Saturday, a single gunman rendered an unspeakable act of violence against Jewish people engaged in prayer at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh.

We at AERA extend our sympathy to the families, friends, and colleagues who have most immediately suffered this loss. Joyce Feinberg, a member of the education research community and formerly staff at the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh, was one of the victims. She was also a member of AERA and our Division of Learning and Instruction until her retirement in 2008. Her work led her to conduct research in schools and in informal education settings such as museums. In this most recent violent event, Joyce Feinberg lost her life. But her work sends a message about where solutions may lie.

In recent years, we have witnessed multiple acts of violence, including school shootings; the killings of dozens of unarmed black men, women, and children; hate crimes against gays; and white supremacy marches. While each of these violent acts is different, they share elements of hate and anger that research from our field can address. For decades, members of our association have carefully studied the root causes of racism, antisemitism, homophobia, and xenophobia, and we have evidence of how schools and other educational institutions can be sites of healing and transformation.

For instance, we know that early socialization with people of different racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural backgrounds, under the right conditions, has a more powerful positive influence on lifelong perspectives than does later exposure. We also know that direct and continuing interaction with people of diverse backgrounds and perspectives can, when thoughtfully implemented, enhance respectful relationships and inter-group understanding.

Research in the field of education provides abundant examples of what those inter-group interactions and shared learning experiences should look like. There are effective research-based violence prevention programs that can be introduced and further refined and tested in schools and the informal educational spaces that Joyce taught us about. In addition, we have knowledge of how to teach and construct formal and informal curricula that can reduce hate and prejudice rather than ignore or perpetuate it. We also know that curricula that do not center or privilege one viewpoint or perspective help students see value in cultural expressions that are too often marginalized in a predominantly white and Christian nation. Teaching young people the value of other ways of knowing makes them less hostile toward those who are different.

Finally, we know from the research the power that adult authority figures have over children in shaping their beliefs and behaviors, and we see daily illustrations that too few adults have led by example to create and foster a more respectful and peaceful society.

What we know already can be better disseminated, used, and applied. AERA has held public events and scholarly sessions around this agenda. But we know that these issues must be studied further and researchers must work more closely with educators to derive more promising practices in schools and classrooms that can be models for others. We renew our call to the education research community to enlarge our focus on work that addresses racism, antisemitism, homophobia, and xenophobia.

Tragedies such as the mass shooting in the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh lead us to reaffirm our research call to action and to work side-by-side with the thousands of educators who know that our field has the knowledge and commitment to prevent further violence. In the memory of our colleague Joyce and others who have lost their lives to violence in recent years, we renew our commitment to the potential of education to free us from hatred and reduce the divisions and inequality that erode democratic ideals.

– Felice J. Levine, AERA Executive Director

– Amy Stuart Wells, AERA 2018–19 President

About AERA

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is the largest national interdisciplinary research association devoted to the scientific study of education and learning. Founded in 1916, AERA advances knowledge about education, encourages scholarly inquiry related to education, and promotes the use of research to improve education and serve the public good. Find AERA on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

# # #

This release can be found online.

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American Educational Research Association

1430 K Street, NW

Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20005
(202) 238-3200

Does Public Engagement Really Matter?

This item from AERA this morning falls in line with my own way of thinking around the notions of how K-12 distance, online, and/or blended learning practitioners understand, believe, and view research in the field.

View this email in your browser.

American Educational Research Association

Dear Michael Barbour,

Is science communication important? Does public engagement really matter? Should the scientific community do more or less to support these activities? Here’s your chance to be heard.

Please help us improve our understanding of scientific communication and public engagement by completing the following 15-minute survey:

https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8A3XPmHeRmGqRaB

The study is covered by the Institutional Review Boards (IRB) of the University of Texas-Austin and Michigan State University. Participation in the survey is voluntary, and all responses are anonymous and confidential. Additional information, including contact information for any questions, is provided in the introduction to the survey at the link above.

The American Educational Research Association is one of thirty professional societies participating in this landmark survey – administered by ScienceCounts and the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science – to assess members’ views on science communication and public engagement. Your responses will help us better serve our members, as well as help shape the trajectory of community-wide science communication and public engagement efforts.

Thank you for generously donating your time to support this important endeavor.

Sincerely,

Felice J. Levine, Ph.D.

Executive Director

American Educational Research Association

American Educational Research Association

1430 K Street, NW

Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20005

(202) 238-3200

www.aera.net

October 19, 2018

Learn Something New With AERA-VRLC

Note this learning opportunity from the American Education Research Association.

View this email in your browser.

American Educational Research Association

New Courses Added to the AERA Virtual Research Learning Center!

Select professional development and training courses that were recorded during the 2018 Annual Meeting are now available for online streaming through theAERA-Virtual Research Learning Center (AERA-VRLC). Specialized training in quantitative and qualitative research methods, advanced skills in statistical techniques, and other important substantive areas, are addressed in these professional development courses.

Courses are designed at various levels (e.g., basic, intermediate, advanced) to reach graduate students, early career scholars, and other researchers who seek to increase their knowledge and enhance research skills. Visit the AERA-VRLCfor complete course descriptions, course fees, and registration information or contact profdevel@aera.net.

The new courses that are available include:

PDC04: Introduction to Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Instructors: Amy L. Dent, University of California, Irvine; Terri D. Pigott, Loyola University Chicago; Joshua R. Polanin, Development Services Group; Joseph Taylor, BSCS

This course will introduce the basics of systematic review and meta-analysis. Topics covered include developing a research question, searching the literature, evaluating and coding studies, conducting a meta-analysis, and interpreting results for various stakeholders. Participants are encouraged to bring an idea for a systematic review to the course, with time reserved for discussion about it with course instructors. Course activities will include lecture, hands-on exercises, small-group discussion, and individual consultation. The target audience includes both those new to systematic review and meta-analysis and those currently conducting either type of project. Knowledge of basic descriptive statistics is assumed.

PDC11: Exploring a Data-Informed Approach to the Development of Students’ Social-Emotional Competencies

Instructors: Rolf K. Blank, NORC at the University of Chicago; Katie H. Buckley, Transforming Education; Bob LaRocca, Transforming Education

The purpose of this course is to provide researchers, educators, and administrators with best practices in assessing and supporting student social-emotional learning (SEL) skills. Participants will have the opportunity to explore measures designed for different uses, and SEL-related strategies for improving student outcomes. The course will begin with a discussion of the research and rationale behind measuring SEL and an examination of current assessments and their differing purposes. The second half of the course will feature a discussion on how to use resulting data from SEL measures (at the classroom, school, and system levels) and will model concrete, hands-on strategies and tools to strengthen student skills.

PDC16: Using NAEP Data on the Web for Educational Policy Research

Instructors: Debra Kline, Educational Testing Service; Edward M. Kulick, Educational Testing Service; Emmanuel Sikali, U.S. Department of Education

This course is for researchers interested in using the NAEP Data Explorer Web tool. Participants will be guided through an examination of the NAEP data, focusing on (1) student, teacher, and school variables; (2) relationships between student performance and characteristics of students, their teachers, and their schools; and (3) using NAEP data to supplement other educational research. The course provides hands-on learning and active participation. Participants will work independently and share their findings with the group. The course will highlight 2015 NAEP math and reading data.

PDC21: What Would it Take to Change Your Inference? Quantifying the Discourse about Causal Inferences in the Social Sciences

Instructors: Kenneth Frank, Michigan State University

Participants will learn the fundamentals of inferences from quantitative analysis in the social sciences, including Rubin’s causal model (the counterfactual) and statistical control through regression. Using these fundamentals, they will learn to characterize the robustness of statistical inferences and violations of assumptions from quantitative analyses. They will learn to characterize the robustness of inferences from a regression in terms of correlations associated with an omitted variable (assumed to be zero in making inferences from a regression). Participants will learn not only how to conceptualize the robustness of an inference but also how to calculate the sensitivity of inferences from general linear models using spreadsheets (Excel) or macros in SPSS, SAS, or STATA. Participants will learn how to apply the techniques to concerns about internal and external validity, as well extensions of the techniques to logistic regression and multilevel models. Participants will learn to employ a language for articulating the robustness of inferences that can be applied to their own analyses or to inferences in the literature.

 

American Educational Research Association

1430 K Street, NW

Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20005

(202) 238-3200

www.aera.net

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