Virtual School Meanderings

June 24, 2022

Teacher shortage

The second of two “Think Twice” reviews of a think tank report from the folks at the National Education Policy Center.

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June 23, 2022READ IN BROWSER
Hello, Great Lakes Center subscriber:

Between February 2020 and May 2022, about 300,000 public school teachers and staff have left their positions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The educator shortage is being felt in many communities across the United States.
In response to COVID-19 related shortages, the TNTP think tank released a report outlining recommendations for district leaders for creating short- and long-term staffing plans.
While the topic of teacher shortages is in critical need of examination and solutions, the report has weaknesses in the basis of its research, leaving policymakers unsure of the potential success of its recommendations.

Read on to learn more.

Maddie Fennell

Executive Director
Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice

REPORT REVIEWED

Ed Fuller of Pennsylvania State University reviewed “Addressing Teacher Shortages: Practical Ideas for the Pandemic and Beyond.”

WHAT THE REVIEWER FOUND

TNTP’s stated purpose for the report is to help education leaders understand and respond to staffing challenges, “based on best practices gathered working with hundreds of school systems over almost 25 years.”
The report is very timely and can help some districts examine current educator shortages or plan for future ones. The report makes recommendations for diagnosing staffing problems, creating short- and long-term plans, and policies that would reduce barriers to becoming a teacher.
However, Fuller found the report fails to provide peer-reviewed research to support its claims and so it is unclear for the reader which recommendations are evidence-based.
The report also assumes districts have ample discretionary funds, rendering many of its recommendations useless to smaller districts, those in rural communities or other districts with limited funds.
Finally, the report ignores key research-based issues: The importance of teacher-student relationships to learning; the importance of school leaders of color in recruiting and retaining teachers of color; and the importance of principal stability in creating a stable workforce of qualified teachers.
Other peer-reviewed research has demonstrated the importance of these factors, including the National Education Policy Center’s (NEPC) policy brief on “grow-your-own” teacher programs. These programs are seen as a possible solution to the educator shortage and a way to recruit a new generation of teachers of color. The NEPC report outlines strategic ways to implement the practice.
The TNTP report covers a worthwhile topic and may be of limited use to some schools and education leaders, although readers and policymakers should consider additional research to determine the effects of implementing the report’s recommendations.

Read the full review on the Great Lakes Center website or on the National Education Policy Center website.

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE

Because of the report’s lack of evidence-based research, policymakers and other readers are left to research independently on whether the recommendations could be implemented effectively. Given the urgency of the educator shortage in many areas of the country, those looking to address the teacher shortage would be better off seeking out peer-reviewed research. Without using the best possible research, it’s unlikely schools will be able to address the widespread teacher shortage, which will ultimately impact student learning.

TALKING POINTS TO REMEMBER

  1. Amidst a widespread teacher shortage, the TNTP think tank released a report outlining recommendations for district leaders on creating short- and long-term staffing plans.
  1. While the report is timely, it suffers from research-related weaknesses that leave unclear the potential success of its recommendations.
  1. A review of the National Education Policy Center found readers and policymakers should instead examine peer-reviewed research when considering ways to address the educator shortage.

SOCIAL SHARES

Want to share this Think Twice Review with your social networks? We drafted some sample social media posts for your use.
Teacher shortages are being felt across the U.S. Beware of non-peer-reviewed research before implementing solutions. Teacher shortages are being felt across the U.S. Beware of non-peer-reviewed research before implementing solutions.
While there are many recommended solutions for addressing the #TeacherShortage, not all are evidence-based. Read more: While there are many recommended solutions for addressing the #TeacherShortage, not all are evidence-based. Read more:
A review from @NEPCtweet found a report on addressing the #TeacherShortage doesn’t utilize peer-reviewed research. Read more: A review from @NEPCtweet found a report on addressing the #TeacherShortage doesn’t utilize peer-reviewed research. Read more:
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Think Twice, a project of the National Education Policy Center, provides the public, policymakers and the press with timely, academically sound reviews of selected publications. The project is made possible by funding from the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice.
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Don’t Collapse Multiple School Performance Indicators Into a Summative Rating on State School Report Cards, Warns New Policy Brief

The first of two “Think Twice” reviews of a think tank report from the folks at the National Education Policy Center.

June 23, 2022

Contact:

Michelle Renée Valladares: (720) 505-1958, michelle.valladares@colorado.edu
Gail L. Sunderman: (410) 435-1207, glsunderman@yahoo.com

Don’t Collapse Multiple School Performance Indicators Into a Summative Rating on State School Report Cards, Warns New Policy Brief

Key Takeaway: Summative ratings are limited indicators of student learning and can misidentify schools, potentially leading to misappropriation of resources for school improvement.

EAST LANSING, MI (June 23, 2022) – The federal Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 provided states with slightly more flexibility in the design of their school accountability systems. However, while states may take different approaches to measuring and reporting school performance, they have consistently chosen approaches of public reporting that collapse multiple school performance indicators into a summative rating.

In a new NEPC policy brief, State Accountability Rating Systems: A Review of School Report Cards as Indicators of School Quality, Gail L. Sunderman, co-founder and former director of the Maryland Equity Project at the University of Maryland, discusses the difficulties that arise when state’s school report cards use this summative-rating approach.

A core element of the Every Student Succeeds Act is the requirement that states develop statewide systems allowing for meaningful differentiation among schools. States are then required to use this information to identify schools that should be the focus of improvement efforts. Individual states decide on the type of report card, or rating system, that they will use to report this information to the public.

These report cards are intended to publicize information about how well schools and districts meet specified goals, which would ideally incentivize school improvement. However, for report card rating systems to be potentially beneficial as a school improvement policy instrument, they must provide fair and valid indicators of school performance.

The increased flexibility under ESSA means that states are following different policy paths reflecting their own interests, concerns, political perspectives, and economic conditions. Approaches that collapse multiple school performance indicators into a summative rating are concerning because there is very limited credible research on how well a single score captures the complexity of school performance or provides information on how to improve.

“Summative ratings that conflate information into a single score obscure a great deal of information about variations in school performance,” Dr. Sunderman explains. “They also do little to explain performance differences between or within schools or to help identify effective strategies to address low performance.”

Moreover, the available research evidence suggests that summative ratings fail to identify schools with high and equitable achievement, distinguishing such schools from those with high average achievement and large achievement gaps. Indeed, available research suggests that summative ratings advantage schools serving primarily higher income students while obscuring the failure of such schools to serve all children.

For policymakers designing accountability systems, Dr. Sunderman provides recommendations for resolving the significant challenges of using a single score that also reflects the complexity of teaching and learning.

Find State Accountability Rating Systems: A Review of School Report Cards as Indicators of School Qualityby Gail L. Sunderman, at:
https://greatlakescenter.org

This policy brief was made possible in part by the support of the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice (greatlakescenter.org).

The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), a university research center housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.eduAbout The Great Lakes Center
The mission of the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice is to support and disseminate high quality research and reviews of research for the purpose of informing education policy and to develop research-based resources for use by those who advocate for education reform. Visit the Great Lakes Center Web Site at: https://www.greatlakescenter.org. Follow us on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/greatlakescent. Find us on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/GreatLakesCenter.

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The mission of the Great Lakes Center for Education Research & Practice is to support and disseminate high quality research and reviews of research for the purpose of informing education policy and to develop research-based resources for use by those who advocate for education reform.

Visit the Great Lakes Center website at https://www.greatlakescenter.org/

EdTech and Emergency Remote Learning: A Systema… was uploaded by Helen Crompton

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 10:03 am
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An item from another one of my open scholarship networks.

Academia.edu

Hi Michael,

Helen Crompton just uploaded “EdTech and Emergency Remote Learning: A Systematic Review.”

EdTech and Emergency Remote Learning: A Systematic Review
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2021
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Michael, You Have A New Citation

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 8:09 am
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Another item from one of my open scholarship networks.

ResearchGate
Michael, we found more citations of your work last week
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The actual citation, which may be of interest, was:

  • June 2022
  • Journal of Computer Assisted Learning
  • DOI: 10.1111/jcal.12696
  • Shuqin Li
  • Weihua Wang

Abstract – Background Blended learning programs in Kindergarten through Grade 12 (K‐12) classrooms are growing in popularity; however, previous studies assessing their effects have yielded inconsistent results. Further, their effects have not been completely quantitatively synthesized and evaluated. Objectives The purpose of this study is to synthesize the overall effects of blended learning on K‐12 student performance, distinguish the most effective domains of learning outcomes, and examine the moderators of the overall effects. Methods For the purpose, this study conducted a meta‐analysis of 84 studies published between 2000 and 2020, and involved 30,377 K‐12 students. Results and Conclusions Results revealed that blended learning can significantly improve K‐12 students’ overall performance [g = 0.65, p < 0.001, 95% CI = (0.54–0.77)], particularly in the cognitive domain [g = 0.74, p < 0.001, 95% CI = (0.61–0.88)). The testing of moderators indicates that the factors moderating the impact of blended learning on student performance in these studies included group activities, educational level, subject, knowledge type, instructor, sample size, intervention duration and region. Implications The results indicate that blended learning is an effective way to improve K‐12 students’ performance compared to traditional face‐to‐face (F2F) learning. Additionally, these findings highlight valuable recommendations for future research and practices related to effective blended learning approaches in K‐12 settings.

Michael, people are recommending your work

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 6:05 am
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An item from one of my open scholarship networks.

ResearchGate
Michael K. Barbour
Your weekly stats report is here
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The actual report read:

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Arnab Kundu
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