Virtual School Meanderings

September 17, 2018

Publication Alert đź“š Racial and Economic Diversity Trends in Virtual Charter Schools

See this new report from the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute.

MVLRI-publications-update-banner.png

Our latest publication is now available!

Stay up to date with the latest research on virtual learning by following new publications. Below you will find the abstract to our most recent publication, as well as a link to the full, downloadable report. We hope you find it helpful.

New-Research-in-Online-&-Blended-Learning-Report-Cover.png

Racial and Economic Diversity Trends in Virtual Charter Schools
Bryan Mann, University of Alabama

Abstract: This study analyzes national and state enrollment data to examine racial and economic diversity in virtual charter schools (VCS). Previous research shows that VCSs enroll higher percentages of white students and lower percentages of economically disadvantaged students compared to national averages. The study presented here combines descriptive data with the Exposure Index strategy used in school segregation and diversity research. The purpose is to analyze the consistency of previous findings across and within states. The findings here reiterate that, in general, more white students attend VCSs, and the virtual charter sector has proportionally more economically advantaged students compared to other types of schools. However, despite enrollment distributions typically showing that VCSs are not diverse, patterns vary across states.

Download the Full Report

Stay connected with everything

MVLRI has to offer!

Visit our past publications, watch and set reminders for webinars and podcasts, or explore our blogs and our free guides to online learning. We hope that you find something that helps you support new learning models and share best practices for student success in online learning.

Explore Our Research and ResourcesPlease feel free to offer feedback on any MVLRI initiatives by emailing us at mvlri@michiganvirtual.org. Thank you!

Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute
3101 Technology Blvd. Suite G • Lansing, Michigan 48910

August 23, 2018

Publication Alert đź“š Learning Trajectories in Online Mathematics Courses

See this item from the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute.

MVLRI-publications-update-banner.png

Our latest publication is now available!

Stay up to date with the latest research on virtual learning by following new publications. Below you will find the abstract to our most recent publication, as well as a link to the full, downloadable report. We hope you find it helpful.

Learning-Trajectories-in-Online-Math-Course.png

Learning Trajectories
in Online Mathematics Courses
Jemma Bae Kwon, Michigan Virtual

Abstract: Present research has devoted attention to a long-standing problem: how to better serve students who take K-12 online mathematics courses by investigating learner subgroups based on their semester-long learning trajectories. Mixture growth modeling was used to examine month-by-month scores students earned by completing assignments. The best-fitting model suggested four distinct subgroups representing (1) nearly linear growth, (2) exponential growth, (3) hardly any growth, (4) and early rapid growth. Follow-up analyses demonstrated that two different types of successful trajectories were more likely associated with advanced level courses, such as AP or Calculus courses, and foundation courses, such as Algebra and Geometry, were with the unpromising trajectory. Given those results, implications for practitioners and researchers were discussed from the perspective of self-regulated online learning and evidence-based mathematics instructional practices.

Download the Full Report

Stay connected with everything

MVLRI has to offer!

Visit our past publications, watch and set reminders for webinars and podcasts, or explore our blogs and our free guides to online learning. We hope that you find something that helps you support new learning models and share best practices for student success in online learning.

Explore Our Research and ResourcesPlease feel free to offer feedback on any MVLRI initiatives by emailing us at mvlri@michiganvirtual.org. Thank you!

Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute
3101 Technology Blvd. Suite G • Lansing, Michigan 48910

July 24, 2018

CANeLearn – Étude de paritĂ© de services en FAD (Alberta)

Note that this item went under my radar screen when it was released earlier this year.  I was aware of the reports, and even contributed to them.  I just didn’t know that they had been made public yet.

Étude de parité de services en FAD (Alberta)

Le Centre francophone d’éducation à distance (CFED) de l’Alberta via le Conseil scolaire Centre-Est a demandé une étude de parité ou d’équité entre les services d’éducation à distance offerts par le CFÉD et les services d’éducation à distance offerts par Alberta Distance Learning Centre (ALDC), ainsi que par deux (2) fournisseurs d’éducation à distance en milieu minoritaire hors province et ce, en considération des programmes, des ressources humaines, des modèles de financement et des services offerts et de l’appui gouvernemental fourni à chacune de ces entités.


The Francophone Distance Education Centre (CFED) of Alberta via the Central East School Board requested a study of parity or equity between distance education services offered by the CFED and distance education services offered by Alberta Distance Learning Centre (ALDC), as well as two (2) distance education providers in minority communities outside the province and, in consideration of programs, human resources, funding models and the services and government support provided to each of these entities.

 

July 7, 2018

Connections Academy Efficacy Report

One of the items in the Virtual Schooling In The News item earlier today.  It is important to note that every independent examination of the performance of students in this particular program have found that they did not fare well compared to their brick-and-mortar counterparts (e.g., CREDO, NEPC, etc.).  But of course the report produced on behalf of the company themselves finds the exact opposite, using a methodology that it has complained about in the past.

But to be fair, I wanted to pass it along for others to review for themselves.

Connections Academy Efficacy Report

June 30, 2018

[STLHE-L:] Primary Research Group Inc. has published the: Survey of American College Students: Use of Distance, Blended, Self-Paced & Flipped-Classroom Education, ISBN 978-157440-533-0

While this is focused on the higher education environment, there are some lessons in here for the K-12 environment as well.

Primary Research Group Inc. has published the: Survey of American College Students: Use of Distance, Blended, Self-Paced & Flipped-Classroom Education, ISBN 978-157440-533-0

This comprehensive 140-page report gives highly detailed data on the use of distance, blended, self-paced, independent study and flipped-classroom education by 1,065 full time students at 4-year colleges in the United States.  The study answers questions such as:  how many college students have taken distance learning classes and how open are they to taking them in the future? How many of their total classroom credits are accounted for by distance education?  The report also provides data for the number of credits accumulated through blended learning classes, self-paced independent study, and courses using flipped-classroom techniques. Moreover, in open ended questions, students give their opinion of what they think of these technologies and approaches.

Data in the report is presented in the aggregate and broken out for 16 variables such as age, gender, sexual orientation, family of origin income level, academic major or intended major, ACT/SAT scores, college grades, regional origin, public/private school status, institutional Carnegie class, race and ethnicity and other variables.

Just a few of the report’s many findings are that:

52.49% of students sampled said their institutions allowed them to take distance learning courses to satisfy course credit requirements.

In terms of student age groups, students over the age of 30 were by far the most likely to have taken a distance learning course at their present institution; 66.27% had done so.

Students who consider their religion a very important part of their life are more likely than their secular counterparts to have ever taken a blended learning course at their present institution.

17.28% of those sampled had ever taken an instructor-led independent study course.

About 8.5% of students who have a full time job have taken one or more self-paced independent study courses that are web or video-based and which do not emphasize a live instructor.

Students who grew up in the US South were more likely than those who grew up in other regions or abroad to say that they would likely take a distance learning course in the future.

Students who grew up abroad had accumulated far more flipped classroom credits than had students who grew up in the USA.

For further information view our website at www.PrimaryResearch.com

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