Virtual School Meanderings

December 13, 2018

These New Articles For Distance Education Are Available Online

Note the earlier access to this K-12 online learning article that will be coming out in the new year.  In the interest of full disclosure, I am one of the authors.

September 4, 2018

DDL Presentation Moved – AECT 2018 And K-12 Online Learning

I received this notice sometime last week.

Karen, Cecil, Rick, Michael, Joshua,

One of the DDL presentations has cancelled. In order to balance the number of DDL session at one time, I have moved your presentation to 4:55pm-5:20pm, Marriott, Jay McShann B.
Only need to hear from you if there is a problem.
Dalinda Bond
AECT Convention Scheduler

This means that the current schedule of K-12 distance, online, and/or blended learning sessions is as follow.


SMT-Differentiation practices of Virtual School Teachers

Wed, Oct 24, 3:35 to 4:00pm, Muehlebach, Hoover

Short Description

To understand how online teachers meet the needs of diverse learners, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with teachers in four virtual schools. Participants were questioned on how differentiation is seen in their practice. Grounded theory and structural, analysis of the data should reveal the self-reported differentiation practices of online teachers. Further, it will begin to distinguish between the practices of expert online teachers and novice teachers. Future research and implications are discussed.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Jennifer Beasley, University of Arkansas

DDL-K-12 Online Learning Journal Articles: Trends from Two Decades of Scholarship

Wed, Oct 24, 4:55 to 5:20pm, Marriott, Jay McShann B

Short Description

This research reviewed 356 articles in K-12 online learning from 1994–2016. We analyzed authorship, journals, citations, keywords, abstracts, and research methodologies. We found the field of K-12 online learning to be growing and maturing. In the last few years there has been a rapid acceleration not only of new articles, but especially of new authors. This infusion of new scholarship will undoubtedly lead to new ideas and trends over the next decade.

Authors

  • Contributor: Karen T Arnesen, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Cecil R Short, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Rick West, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Michael Barbour, Touro University, California
  • Contributor: Joshua Hveem, Brigham Young University

RTD Roundtable-The Effect of Practicum Experiences on Preparing Teacher Candidates for Successful K-12 Online Teaching

  • In Event: RTD-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Roundtable Session: RTD-Roundtable Session

Thu, Oct 25, 2:15 to 3:20pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The study is to examine the effect of practicum experiences on preparing teacher candidates for successful K-12 online teaching. Each candidate needs to design, develop and deliver an online or hybrid 3-week module to his or her students. A mixed-method design will be used to collect data including a survey, online interviews and a systematic examination of summative evaluation reports and weekly teaching logs. The results and implications will be discussed in the presentation.

Authors

  • Contributor: E-Ling Hsiao, Valdosta State University
  • Contributor: Xiaoxia Huang, Western Kentucky University

DDL-Does mileage traveled to testing sites impact online students test scores?

Thu, Oct 25, 2:55 to 3:20pm, Marriott, Julia Lee A

Short Description

Research shows that virtual school students don’t score as well as traditional students on state tests. Other research suggests that testing fatigue may harm achievement, and one source of fatigue may be the distance students travel to testing sites. Achievement data was collected from two virtual schools on whether driving distance is determinant of test scores, while controlling for demographic characteristics. Implications and future research are discussed.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Ian E Kingsbury, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Robert Maranto, University of Arkansas

SMT-Discovering Utilization Patterns in an Online K-12 Teacher Professional Development: Clustering and Data Visualization Methods

  • In Event: SMT-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: SMT-Poster Session

Thu, Oct 25, 3:35 to 4:40pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

This proposal reports on a completed study on utilization patterns of the content and site features of a K-12 online professional development platform by data mining web metrics records. Data mining, feature selection, simple K-means clustering and visualization methods were used to make sense of the massive volume of web metrics. The cross-industry standard process for data mining (CRISP-DM) was utilized with the clustering approach to form patterns among new and returning visitors seeking PD.

Authors

  • Contributor: Javier Leung, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Contributor: Javier Leung, University of Missouri-Columbia

INTL-K-12 Online Supplementary Tutoring in China: Private Tutoring for Social Equity?

  • In Event: INTL & Affiliate-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: INTL-Poster Session

Thu, Oct 25, 4:55 to 6:00pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The school education system in China has been criticized as a system that reinforcing social inequality in the past decades. The huge urban-rural disparities and the key school system – a state-sponsored hierarchical school system hinder equal access to quality educational resources. Will online education bring changes to the system? My research will examine the emerging K-12 online supplementary tutoring business to explore the the issue of online education, online tutoring business, and educational inequality in China.

Author

  • Contributor: Yang Lai, Ohio University

ICEM Roundtable-Examining the Effects of Demographics in Online K-12 Education

  • In Event: INTL & Affiliate-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Roundtable Session: ICEM-Roundtable Session

Thu, Oct 25, 4:55 to 6:00pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The purpose of the study is to examine whether various demographic characteristics contribute to academic success as well as academic failure for high school students taking online classes. The presentation will provide insight if there is a correlation between specific demographic variables and academic success in K-12. This session will be beneficial to K-12 administration such as counselors, principals, and online teachers.

Authors

  • Contributor: Jerri Ward-Jackson, Mississippi Stae University
  • Contributor: Chien Yu, Mississippi State University

TED-Virtual schools’ recruitment practices: An analysis of virtual school commercials

  • In Event: TED-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: TED-Poster Session

Fri, Oct 26, 9:00 to 10:05am, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

Virtual schools (VS) are a growing phenomenon in K-12 education. Unfortunately, little is know about their recruitment and enrollment practices. To understand how VS have such different racial, socioeconomic and special education student representation than traditional public schools, we investigated the multiple messages and interpretations of virtual school advertisements, employing methods innate to the field of cultural studies. Preliminary results show that VS intend to recruit students of a particular type.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Christian Goering, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Jonathan Allred, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Seth French, University of Arkansas

August 27, 2018

Changes to the AECT Conference Program Presentation Schedule

I received this late last week.

Hi Everyone,

This is a heads-up. I have been notified that the schedule of presentations in the AECT conference program has changed and that the first two weeks the conference program is available is when we receive some cancellations or we find out about presenter contingencies. As you can imagine, the conference administrators are trying to meet these.

As we had some presentation cancellations, the conference administrators needed to make some room changes that required moving some presentations. They tried to keep the presentation changes within the same day or close to other presentations of the authors.

Therefore, there may be additional small changes during this 2 week window. Please check the program schedule for updates, and then again perhaps in a few weeks.

Sincerely,

Victoria Lowell, Division of Distance Learning – President-Elect
2018 AECT Conference Planner
vllowell@purdue.edu

I checked and all of these are still good.


SMT-Differentiation practices of Virtual School Teachers

Wed, Oct 24, 3:35 to 4:00pm, Muehlebach, Hoover

Short Description

To understand how online teachers meet the needs of diverse learners, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with teachers in four virtual schools. Participants were questioned on how differentiation is seen in their practice. Grounded theory and structural, analysis of the data should reveal the self-reported differentiation practices of online teachers. Further, it will begin to distinguish between the practices of expert online teachers and novice teachers. Future research and implications are discussed.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Jennifer Beasley, University of Arkansas

DDL-K-12 Online Learning Journal Articles: Trends from Two Decades of Scholarship

Wed, Oct 24, 4:15 to 4:40pm, Muehlebach, Truman A

Short Description

This research reviewed 356 articles in K-12 online learning from 1994–2016. We analyzed authorship, journals, citations, keywords, abstracts, and research methodologies. We found the field of K-12 online learning to be growing and maturing. In the last few years there has been a rapid acceleration not only of new articles, but especially of new authors. This infusion of new scholarship will undoubtedly lead to new ideas and trends over the next decade.

Authors

  • Contributor: Karen T Arnesen, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Cecil R Short, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Rick West, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Michael Barbour, Touro University, California
  • Contributor: Joshua Hveem, Brigham Young University

RTD Roundtable-The Effect of Practicum Experiences on Preparing Teacher Candidates for Successful K-12 Online Teaching

  • In Event: RTD-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Roundtable Session: RTD-Roundtable Session

Thu, Oct 25, 2:15 to 3:20pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The study is to examine the effect of practicum experiences on preparing teacher candidates for successful K-12 online teaching. Each candidate needs to design, develop and deliver an online or hybrid 3-week module to his or her students. A mixed-method design will be used to collect data including a survey, online interviews and a systematic examination of summative evaluation reports and weekly teaching logs. The results and implications will be discussed in the presentation.

Authors

  • Contributor: E-Ling Hsiao, Valdosta State University
  • Contributor: Xiaoxia Huang, Western Kentucky University

DDL-Does mileage traveled to testing sites impact online students test scores?

Thu, Oct 25, 2:55 to 3:20pm, Marriott, Julia Lee A

Short Description

Research shows that virtual school students don’t score as well as traditional students on state tests. Other research suggests that testing fatigue may harm achievement, and one source of fatigue may be the distance students travel to testing sites. Achievement data was collected from two virtual schools on whether driving distance is determinant of test scores, while controlling for demographic characteristics. Implications and future research are discussed.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Ian E Kingsbury, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Robert Maranto, University of Arkansas

SMT-Discovering Utilization Patterns in an Online K-12 Teacher Professional Development: Clustering and Data Visualization Methods

  • In Event: SMT-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: SMT-Poster Session

Thu, Oct 25, 3:35 to 4:40pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

This proposal reports on a completed study on utilization patterns of the content and site features of a K-12 online professional development platform by data mining web metrics records. Data mining, feature selection, simple K-means clustering and visualization methods were used to make sense of the massive volume of web metrics. The cross-industry standard process for data mining (CRISP-DM) was utilized with the clustering approach to form patterns among new and returning visitors seeking PD.

Authors

  • Contributor: Javier Leung, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Contributor: Javier Leung, University of Missouri-Columbia

INTL-K-12 Online Supplementary Tutoring in China: Private Tutoring for Social Equity?

  • In Event: INTL & Affiliate-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: INTL-Poster Session

Thu, Oct 25, 4:55 to 6:00pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The school education system in China has been criticized as a system that reinforcing social inequality in the past decades. The huge urban-rural disparities and the key school system – a state-sponsored hierarchical school system hinder equal access to quality educational resources. Will online education bring changes to the system? My research will examine the emerging K-12 online supplementary tutoring business to explore the the issue of online education, online tutoring business, and educational inequality in China.

Author

  • Contributor: Yang Lai, Ohio University

ICEM Roundtable-Examining the Effects of Demographics in Online K-12 Education

  • In Event: INTL & Affiliate-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Roundtable Session: ICEM-Roundtable Session

Thu, Oct 25, 4:55 to 6:00pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The purpose of the study is to examine whether various demographic characteristics contribute to academic success as well as academic failure for high school students taking online classes. The presentation will provide insight if there is a correlation between specific demographic variables and academic success in K-12. This session will be beneficial to K-12 administration such as counselors, principals, and online teachers.

Authors

  • Contributor: Jerri Ward-Jackson, Mississippi Stae University
  • Contributor: Chien Yu, Mississippi State University

TED-Virtual schools’ recruitment practices: An analysis of virtual school commercials

  • In Event: TED-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: TED-Poster Session

Fri, Oct 26, 9:00 to 10:05am, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

Virtual schools (VS) are a growing phenomenon in K-12 education. Unfortunately, little is know about their recruitment and enrollment practices. To understand how VS have such different racial, socioeconomic and special education student representation than traditional public schools, we investigated the multiple messages and interpretations of virtual school advertisements, employing methods innate to the field of cultural studies. Preliminary results show that VS intend to recruit students of a particular type.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Christian Goering, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Jonathan Allred, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Seth French, University of Arkansas

August 20, 2018

AECT Conference Schedule

I received this in my inbox over the weekend.

Hi Everyone,

I am excited to announcement that the AECT program schedule has been published! Please check the schedule to be certain you know when you are presenting for neccessary preparations.

I have received several emails regarding changing personal information. Although I am not able to change your information, you can log into AllAcademic and change your inforation within the portal. If you will changing your email address, please be sure to change your email information in the AECT conference portal as we will contact you using the address on file. If you have any problems, please contact AECT at: aect@aect.org or 877-677-2328.

Sincerely,

Victoria Lowell,
Division of Distance Learning President-Elect
2018 AECT Conference Planner
Vllowell@purdue.edu

A quick search of the schedule for “K-12 online learning,” “K-12 blended learning,” “virtual school,” “cyber school,” cyber charter school,” and “e-school” revealed the following sessions that may be of interest to readers of this space.


SMT-Differentiation practices of Virtual School Teachers

Wed, Oct 24, 3:35 to 4:00pm, Muehlebach, Hoover

Short Description

To understand how online teachers meet the needs of diverse learners, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with teachers in four virtual schools. Participants were questioned on how differentiation is seen in their practice. Grounded theory and structural, analysis of the data should reveal the self-reported differentiation practices of online teachers. Further, it will begin to distinguish between the practices of expert online teachers and novice teachers. Future research and implications are discussed.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Jennifer Beasley, University of Arkansas

DDL-K-12 Online Learning Journal Articles: Trends from Two Decades of Scholarship

Wed, Oct 24, 4:15 to 4:40pm, Muehlebach, Truman A

Short Description

This research reviewed 356 articles in K-12 online learning from 1994–2016. We analyzed authorship, journals, citations, keywords, abstracts, and research methodologies. We found the field of K-12 online learning to be growing and maturing. In the last few years there has been a rapid acceleration not only of new articles, but especially of new authors. This infusion of new scholarship will undoubtedly lead to new ideas and trends over the next decade.

Authors

  • Contributor: Karen T Arnesen, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Cecil R Short, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Rick West, Brigham Young University
  • Contributor: Michael Barbour, Touro University, California
  • Contributor: Joshua Hveem, Brigham Young University

RTD Roundtable-The Effect of Practicum Experiences on Preparing Teacher Candidates for Successful K-12 Online Teaching

  • In Event: RTD-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Roundtable Session: RTD-Roundtable Session

Thu, Oct 25, 2:15 to 3:20pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The study is to examine the effect of practicum experiences on preparing teacher candidates for successful K-12 online teaching. Each candidate needs to design, develop and deliver an online or hybrid 3-week module to his or her students. A mixed-method design will be used to collect data including a survey, online interviews and a systematic examination of summative evaluation reports and weekly teaching logs. The results and implications will be discussed in the presentation.

Authors

  • Contributor: E-Ling Hsiao, Valdosta State University
  • Contributor: Xiaoxia Huang, Western Kentucky University

DDL-Does mileage traveled to testing sites impact online students test scores?

Thu, Oct 25, 2:55 to 3:20pm, Marriott, Julia Lee A

Short Description

Research shows that virtual school students don’t score as well as traditional students on state tests. Other research suggests that testing fatigue may harm achievement, and one source of fatigue may be the distance students travel to testing sites. Achievement data was collected from two virtual schools on whether driving distance is determinant of test scores, while controlling for demographic characteristics. Implications and future research are discussed.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Ian E Kingsbury, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Robert Maranto, University of Arkansas

SMT-Discovering Utilization Patterns in an Online K-12 Teacher Professional Development: Clustering and Data Visualization Methods

  • In Event: SMT-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: SMT-Poster Session

Thu, Oct 25, 3:35 to 4:40pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

This proposal reports on a completed study on utilization patterns of the content and site features of a K-12 online professional development platform by data mining web metrics records. Data mining, feature selection, simple K-means clustering and visualization methods were used to make sense of the massive volume of web metrics. The cross-industry standard process for data mining (CRISP-DM) was utilized with the clustering approach to form patterns among new and returning visitors seeking PD.

Authors

  • Contributor: Javier Leung, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Contributor: Javier Leung, University of Missouri-Columbia

INTL-K-12 Online Supplementary Tutoring in China: Private Tutoring for Social Equity?

  • In Event: INTL & Affiliate-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: INTL-Poster Session

Thu, Oct 25, 4:55 to 6:00pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The school education system in China has been criticized as a system that reinforcing social inequality in the past decades. The huge urban-rural disparities and the key school system – a state-sponsored hierarchical school system hinder equal access to quality educational resources. Will online education bring changes to the system? My research will examine the emerging K-12 online supplementary tutoring business to explore the the issue of online education, online tutoring business, and educational inequality in China.

Author

  • Contributor: Yang Lai, Ohio University

ICEM Roundtable-Examining the Effects of Demographics in Online K-12 Education

  • In Event: INTL & Affiliate-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Roundtable Session: ICEM-Roundtable Session

Thu, Oct 25, 4:55 to 6:00pm, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

The purpose of the study is to examine whether various demographic characteristics contribute to academic success as well as academic failure for high school students taking online classes. The presentation will provide insight if there is a correlation between specific demographic variables and academic success in K-12. This session will be beneficial to K-12 administration such as counselors, principals, and online teachers.

Authors

  • Contributor: Jerri Ward-Jackson, Mississippi Stae University
  • Contributor: Chien Yu, Mississippi State University

TED-Virtual schools’ recruitment practices: An analysis of virtual school commercials

  • In Event: TED-Roundtable/Poster Session
    In Poster Session: TED-Poster Session

Fri, Oct 26, 9:00 to 10:05am, Muehlebach, Royal Exhibit Hall

Short Description

Virtual schools (VS) are a growing phenomenon in K-12 education. Unfortunately, little is know about their recruitment and enrollment practices. To understand how VS have such different racial, socioeconomic and special education student representation than traditional public schools, we investigated the multiple messages and interpretations of virtual school advertisements, employing methods innate to the field of cultural studies. Preliminary results show that VS intend to recruit students of a particular type.

Authors

  • Contributor: Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Christian Goering, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Jonathan Allred, University of Arkansas
  • Contributor: Seth French, University of Arkansas

April 17, 2018

AERA 2018 – Rural School Closure and Consolidation

As I mentioned earlier in the week, the 2018 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association has been happening over the last few days. The sixteenth and final blog entry related to K-12 online learning session from AERA 2018 that I am posting is:

Rural School Closure and Consolidation

In “All of a Sudden, Rural Is on Everyone’s Mind”: Rural Education After Trump
Tue, April 17, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Millennium Broadway New York Times Square, Third Floor, Room 3.02-3.03

Abstract – Rural communities face increasing pressure for school closure and consolidation as well as increasingly charter-friendly federal and state policies under the Trump administration (Klein, 2017). School choice policy is couched within a complex web of educational policy, economic disparities, and an accepted, long-established, cultural disdain of rural people (Wray, 2006). The legislative expansion of school choice policy is the enactment of an ideological shift– from an understanding of the purpose of education as a democratic project to a neoliberal vision of schooling guided by efficiency, consumerism, and economic competitiveness (Shannon, 2007). A policy environment highly favorable to vouchers, cyber schools, and brick and mortar charter schools has been the outcome of this shift.

A neoliberal vision for schools, and its associated policies, however, does not map neatly onto rural schools and communities. The project to make schools more efficient and competitive, via closures, consolidations, and charters, is challenged by the role that rural schools play in the maintenance of the social fabric of rural communities and the central role that rural schools play in the maintenance of a community’s social safety net (DeYoung, 1995; Lyson, 2002; Peshkin, 1982). Rural schools are closed, consolidated, and, sometimes, reopened as charter schools amid this complexity. As a result, rural community members must seek the best option for their children, however “best” is defined.

Questions for Discussion:
How have rural communities experienced closures, consolidation, and charters?
What might the impact be of increasingly pro-charter school policy on rural communities?

Author
Karen Eppley, The Pennsylvania State University

This session was in a larger symposium that was described as:

“All of a Sudden, Rural Is on Everyone’s Mind”: Rural Education After Trump

Tue, April 17, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Millennium Broadway New York Times Square, Third Floor, Room 3.02-3.03

Session Type: Symposium

Abstract

This interactive symposium invites participants to talk across differences regarding the explicitly political nature of teaching, learning, and research. Within a context of new political importance of rural communities, this symposium engages rural educators and researchers in meaningful and constructive conversations about the impact of the current political context on their work. Rural scholars will facilitate small group discussions about the contextualized definitions of rurality, the new relevance of rural places to the political process, the implementation of current policies in rural places, and changes in the intellectual atmosphere of colleges and universities since the election.

The other presenters in this session were (with the one I’m blogging about being the last in the symposium – i.e., after these other four):

  • Rural Differences and Different Ruralites – Michael J. Corbett, Acadia University
  • The “Rural Vote” – Amy Price Azano, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • Rural Education and National Policy in 2018 – Devon G. Brenner, Mississippi State University
  • Anti-Intellectualism and the Rural College Student – Carrie Freie, The Pennsylvania State University – Altoona

The session was not a traditional symposium.  They actually divided the room into three circles and then had each presenter do about 5-8 minutes of material, finish with a series of questions, and then we would spend 8-10 minutes talking in the groups that we were moved into with one or more of the symposium leaders.

In terms of the actual portion that included cyber schooling in the abstract, she began by talking about the tension between the reality that school choice and neo-liberal education policy are focused on competition, while rural education often focuses on the notion of community.  The discussion questions she presented were:

  1. How have rural communities experience closures, consolidation, and charters?
  2. What might the impact be of increasingly pro-chapter school policy on rural communities?

So the session really didn’t have any focus on cyber schooling, it was just mentioned as a possible school choice option and not even mentioned by the presenter.

While having nothing to do with K-12 distance, online, and/or blended learning, it was very fascinating to sit in a room with folks interested in rural education and talking about the last presidential election – and what I believe was a real lack of understanding of what happened (and almost a defensiveness about rural America being blamed for what happened in 2016).

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