Virtual School Meanderings

January 31, 2018

Your Ethos Community Newsletter for January Inbox

And one for my Kiwi readers to end the day.

Your newsletter from the Ethos Online Community – January 2018

Kia ora, talofa lava, and greetings,

And here we are again, sitting at the end of January, with another year ahead of us. We have survived the first few weeks of getting used to those early mornings again. We farewelled mid-day naps, constant snacking and mid-afternoon beers.

How has the return to work treated you? While it may never be easy to give up complete freedom, when you’re happy and engaged at work, it shouldn’t be too drastically traumatic. According to a study, blogged by Sarah Whiting, only 14% of Kiwis felt truly engaged by their jobs. This is a shocking and quite sad statistic. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel, with the blog also suggesting that if a little time and effort is sunk in to altering this then things can always change (and luckily she gives some suggestions on strategies to do this).

I guess this is something that travels in to education as well. How do we ensure students aren’t simply seeing formal learning as a chore that must be done, but are actually having fun, actively learning and thriving in the classroom? It’s also important to instill in children that they have the ability to do what they please with their life, which can also mean breaking the 9-5 work place mould.

This is something millennials seem to be trying to tackle, with the increase in things like remote work. Something that is well-aided by technology. However, it’s a mould that doesn’t seem to be able to truly change – with most people being confined by society’s model of what’s right. And in a lot of ways it’s just as well, because after all, how would we function without a majority workforce?

Simon Sinek notes that one of the issues with millennials is that they’ve been consistently told they can achieve whatever they want, to follow their dreams, but have never been informed of the hard work that must go in behind the scenes. But surely there is a middle ground? Surely we can have both work ethic and happiness?

What are your thoughts on this? How do you think people should approach work to make sure they are both secure and happy? And how do you think society can be flexible to ensure workers are happier, engaged and more productive? And how do we start to teach these values from a young age? We’d love to hear your thoughts.

Know anyone who would like to join an international Online Community that’s all about learning – across all education sectors, business & ITOs: http://bit.ly/233qpfP? Please invite them :)

Member Blog Posts and discussions

In this newsletter, as always, we have some interesting posts. Please jump into the conversations and feel free to ask questions.

  • How happy are we in our jobs? Well, not very according to a recent survey from Gallup. The research found that of the adults who worked full time for an employer, on average, only 15% felt engaged (in terms of being highly involved and enthusiastic) in what they do. NZ/Aus came in just below this average with 14% engagement. Luckily, the report looks to try to solve the issue, not just identify it. However, it does mean a whole lot of commitment to change from all parties. One of the suggestions is a move towards a workforce that focuses on people rather than systems and allows people to identify and work to their own strengths. To read the report and give your input, take a look at this post: Untapped potential. Thanks to Sarah Whiting for finding this research.

  • John Owen looks at a TED talk from the talented Amanda Palmer. Amanda discusses the possibility of surviving as an artist in the online environment. The answer, she believes, is making music freely available and simply asking their fans to pay. Is this something you would participate in as a consumer? Watch the video and see what you think – The art of asking.

  • Humans and machines are often compared. Is this the correct way of looking at things or should we be trying our best to merge the two to ensure we take advantage of both skill sets? Nigel Bailey links us to an article that supposes technology should simply be an extension on the human brain and can, in fact, make it more powerful than ever. Our brains extended looks at how educators should be integrating technology into the curriculum to help this power become a reality.

  • Towards a multiversity: A keynote session with Professor Paul Bacsich from the late, and much missed, Ed Flagg, who looked at a keynote speech from Professor Paul Bacsich at the 2012 Distance Education Association New Zealand (DAENZ) conference in Wellington. Professor Bacsich, from the University of Canterbury, provided a grand overview of the state of eLearning on a global perspective, providing a brief critique and some suggestions about how to move beyond the current landscape: the ‘Multiversity’.

Also recommended

As always you have contributed a superb variety of posts this month. Thank you. Here are some of the posts and topics that you may find of interest:

  • Have you noticed how, when you articulate things – either in a verbal or written form – it feels clearer in your head? Sometimes you may write or say something that you weren’t expecting. There is also evidence from psychology and neuroscience that talking through traumatic experiences, issues, and challenges, shifts it from the amygdala to the frontal lobe; in other words from the instinctual part of your brain to the processing part of your brain – which is on of the reasons that coaching can be so powerful. However, if, for whatever reason, you aren’t working with a coach, you may be interested in self authoring. Find out more in this blog.

  • Promoting the rights of youth – The Freechild Project is now Freechild Institute. In order to accurately reflect its broad commitment to educating youth and adults, Freechild Project leaders have decided to rename the organization. Starting in January 2018, the organization will now be referred to as Freechild Institute. In 2001, Freechild founder Adam Fletcher was supporting a group of youth in Olympia, Washington, who were organizing to promote youth rights. Citing educator A.S. Neill’s question, “How will free children fit into an unfree society?,” the group suggested Fletcher call his emerging project “freechild.” Since then, Freechild has become an international phenomenon, acting as a free database for youth changing the world. Providing more than two dozen free publications and hundreds of teaching tools online, Fletcher has provided training and workshops and keynote speeches on behalf of Freechild.

  • E-Learning can be a daunting subject, with many different micro areas. Hazel addresses some of the common questions that arise with some helpful resources and blogs. Take a look:  Answers to tough questions about eLearning.

  • Great story here (Māori and Pasifika achievement at secondary school) that was shared earlier this month on Radio NZ National, highlighting the absolute importance of learning being culturally grounded. The story focuses on how an Auckland secondary school has made dramatic improvements in the achievement rates of its Maori and Pacific students. With Brian Evans – Principal of Kelston Boys High School in West Auckland, which has seen a marked improvement in the NCEA pass rates for its Maori and Pacific students, who make up three quarters of the school roll.

Recommended videos

From the ever growing repository of videos (1,607 in total – thanks as always to John S Oliver for his awesome contributions), these are a just few of the highlights – there were plenty more this month, so make sure to check them out.

  • Goofy – Teachers are people too – a good, silly watch for those days when you feel that students may forget.

  • Can you solve the dark coin riddle? – Lisa Winer – a little riddle to keep the brain ticking.

  • Higher education is expensive, so people want to get the best deal— a high quality college education at a low cost. This is similar in the way which many for-profit colleges and universities advertise themselves. Many students soon found that the cost of upward mobility through certain for-profit institutions wasn’t the answer for them. These schools saw a huge jump in enrollment during the 2000s. Fueled by a struggling economy and the expansion of federal financial aid for college, many students saw the advertisements of for-profit schools as attainable and affordable. But almost two decade later, there are new regulations to reign in the predatory schools profiting off student debt. And today, over a dozen for-profit colleges in the US (ITT Tech, Corinthian Colleges, Sanford Brown, and others) have closed their doors for good. Explore more in The battle over for-profit colleges, explained.

  • And staying on that topic…. While the cost of college education in the US has reached record highs, Germany has abandoned tuition fees altogether for German and international students alike. BBC’s Franz Strasser looks at the increasing number of Americans who are taking advantage and saving tens of thousands of dollars to get their degrees.

  • Thomas Sowell is an American economist, turned social theorist, political philosopher, and author. He is currently Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. In this segment he explains how geography influences culture. Full video from May, 1998, quoted under fair use.

  • In 1998, 42% of Iceland’s 15 and 16 year-olds reported that they had got drunk in the past 30 days. By 2016, though, this figure had fallen to just 5% and drug use and smoking had also sharply declined. The action plan that led to this dramatic success is sometimes called “the Icelandic Model” – and strikingly, it does not focus on tighter policing or awareness campaigns to warn children off bad habits. Instead, top researchers collaborate closely with communities on initiatives like parental pledges and night-time patrols after dark, while the government invests in recreational facilities. But is being a teenager in Iceland still fun? Let’s find out; How Iceland saved its teenagers

Resources

  • Would you like to know how to create an interactive diagram in Google Slides? Well you’re in luck. Richard Byrne (Free Technology for Teachers) shared this ‘how to’ resource, which you may find useful. Richard writes: “Google Slides has a lot of capabilities that often go overlooked. One of those capabilities is the option to link slides so that viewers don’t have to necessarily see them in a chronological sequence. By linking slides you can create an interactive diagram in Google Slides. In this video I demonstrate how to create an interactive diagram in Google Slides”.

What’s on?

Lots of other things happening (online courses, conferences and other opportunities) including next year’s SoTEL Symposium 2018 taking place in Auckland on February 15.

Please feel free to add events to share them, or just let me know and I’ll add them :-)

Nāku iti nei, faafetai lava, and warm regards

Charlotte

Charlotte Caines
Community Coordinator
Ethos Consultancy NZ Ltd

PO Box 90391, Victoria Street West,
Auckland 1142
Phone +64 (0)9 9738027 / +64 (0)9 5750206
Mobile +64 (0)21 2273777
Web site: http://www.ethosconsultancynz.com/
Blog: http://ictelt.blogspot.com/
Email addresses: info@ethosconsultancynz.com / hazelowendmc@gmail.com
Skype: hazelowendmc

January 15, 2018

OpenCon18 K-12 Athabasca – a Virtual & Free Teacher PD Opportunity

On a slower holiday Monday.

OpenCon18 K-12 Athabasca
A virtual, free K-12 Open Educational Resources Teacher PD Offering
January 25, 2018
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. MST
Theme: “Building the K-12 OER Teacher Network
Follow on Twitter: #K-12OC2018
Open Education Resource (OER) Novice or Champion – You are invited to attend the Open Con18 K-12 Athabasca – a virtual and free conference exploring Open Educational Resources for K-12.
As a satellite offering of the OpenCon17 held in Berlin, the OpenCon18 will mark a first for educators, within Alberta and beyond. Presentations will range from OER fundamentals to the current K-12 OER landscape – see the schedule for details.
Ending our virtual offering will be a unique dialogue – the “Berlin Remix”. A panel discussion has been organized so that the Open Con18 K-12 Athabasca discussants (and attendees – asked upon registration) to view in advance a 20 minute video clip. This recording was part of the Berlin OpenCon17 conference where an international panel explored the broad topic of Inclusive Education and how OER responds to diversity and inclusion needs within education.
For our panel, the discussants will address this Berlin discussion and will “remix” two questions of OER curriculum creation. Within an OER curricular resource, how can educators consider: Who is missing?and Whose knowledge is reliable?
OER holds opportunity for rethinking how resources are accessed and used by K-12 educators. Come and join the “Berlin Remix” Panel Discussion – and one, some or all of the offerings! We hope to nurture a K-12 OER teacher network – and this virtual conference marks the first step of this journey.

 

Note:
Registration is suggested but not required. Please let colleagues know about this opportunity. The K-12 OC will be recorded and archived on the BOLT Multi-author Blog.
A Virtual, Free K-12 Open Educational Resources Teacher PD Offering Date: January 25, 2018 Event URL: https://athabascau.adobeconnect.com/k12oc Hashtag for conference …

 

Constance Blomgren PhD
Assistant Professor
Centre for Distance Education
Athabasca University
Twitter: @DocBlom

December 23, 2017

Your Ethos Community Newsletter for December

One for my Kiwi readers.

Your newsletter from the Ethos Online Community – December 2017

Kia ora, talofa lava, and greetings,

This month I will keep this part of your newsletter short and sweet because, as we’ve got into the habit of doing, the final letter of the year will give a retrospective on some of the amazing things you’ve all contributed to the community this year.

 

We’d  like to say a massive thank you to you all. Your participation in the Ethos Online Community is greatly appreciated and it makes the community what it is: a place where people come together to share and discuss the things happening in learning, education, training and the wider world. We love seeing the amazing ideas, blogs, videos, discussions and welcoming new members – and we can’t wait to work with you again in 2018.

Meri Kirihimete, Manuia le Kerisimasi, happy holidays to you all!!

Welcome to new members – December  2017

The Ethos Online Community now has 451 members. Hope you will all give a warm haere mai (welcome) to December’s new members to the community:

  • Auckland based higher educator and researcher, Ashwini Datt. Ashwini’s interests are in learning design, elearning capacity development, online teaching & learning and networking. Ashwini has already posted around research participation, make sure to check it out and see if you can help

  • With many roles and talents under her belt, Tutor / Lecturer / Programme Developer / Learning Designer, we welcome Nomes Lorimer, also from Auckland

Know anyone who would like to join an international Online Community that’s all about learning – across all education sectors, business & ITOs: http://bit.ly/233qpfP? Please invite them :)

This Month

As always you have contributed a superb variety of posts this month. Thank you. Here are some of the posts and topics that you may find of interest:

  • Is the force with you? Star Wars is one of the biggest movie franchises to ever exist, with devoted fans all over the world. With the movie leaking out in to our everyday lives through merchandise, media and general hype, it’s inevitable that it’s messaging will have at least some impact. Luckily, John S. Oliver, has found a number of resources that delve in to the worldview, or theology and doctrines, that are suggested by dialogue, the key moments in the movies, and the repeated themes. Take a look:  Star Wars has Theology, Doctrines and an Online Temple of Jedi Order

  • Do you have 15 minutes to contribute towards the to the growing information on contemporary elearning professional development approaches? Your help would be much appreciated in aiding Ashwini Datt complete her doctorate research. You can find out more about the research and take the quick survey here: Research participation – networking to build capacity for teaching with technologies

  • Te Tiriti O Waitangi: Settlement process resource links to a great resource by Mark Derby, which “provides an accessible introduction to the Treaty settlement process. The content covers events from 1840, when the Treaty of Waitangi was signed, through to the present day”.

The year that was

Given that this will be the last newsletter of 2017 we thought we’d take the opportunity to reflect upon some highlights. However, narrowing these down from all the amazing posts has been difficult. We’ve limited ourselves to one post per month that has inspired us!

  • January – Building an in-depth understanding of one’s own skillset is imperative in enabling suitable opportunities and aiding in personal and professional growth.  Researcher and Educator, L. Dee Fink, has developed a 6-aspect taxonomy of teaching designed to maximise this understand and therefore also maximise learning in the classroom. In The six dimensions of your development, the late (and much missed) Edward Flagg talked about his professional experience using the framework. The post explained how the theory works and how it fits into a work environment

  • February – In Feb,  Nicholas J Major  posted an interesting blog that slotted nicely into the mentoring information we’ve had filtering through over the last year. Nick simply asks, what’s in a question? Here Nick asks how effective the questions commonly used during mentoring sessions actually are. Particularly the often used ‘why’ question. Nicholas states that a number of sources he has recently encountered suggest that ‘why’, ‘who’, ‘when’ and ‘how’ questions are information seeking questions, whereas ‘what’ questions are wisdom accessing questions. The difference being that the former questions tend to elicit responses grounded in the past, whereas the latter can produce deeper insights that help understand what is important to the other person or help them move forward to accomplish their goals. Nick gives some great examples of particularly evocative questions and research that’s gone into the subject

  • March – MORE Evidence that Teachers Change Lives is a heart-warming post from John S. Oliver. This post looks at one student-teacher’s journey to discovering just how much impact a teacher can have on a student’s life. It’s reassuring to hear stories like this and be reminded of the true importance of education

  • April – In Aspirational v Real Values,  Paul Keown addressed an often unrecognised gap – that which exists between aspirational values and real values. The dilemma arises in people claiming their aspirational values (the way we believe others should think and behave) are in fact their ‘core values’, those that they actually display in their behaviour. This is something that appears in education in many forms, one being the values that are taught in the classroom and by parents, and another being through the vision statement of schools. The gap between those values that authority figures commonly claim students should hold close versus what they’re behaviour actually shows is clear in a study outlined in this post. The study showed that while 96% of parents state it is of utmost importance to raise ethical, caring children, 80% of the youths surveyed reported that their parents “are more concerned about achievement or happiness than caring for others.” This disparity appears yet again when we analyse some of the past activity in New Zealand such as the multiple incidents of young male high-school students making crude comments focused on taking advantage of inebriated young women. In these cases the schools have come out stating that the values displayed by these students vary hugely from the school’s own. So what’s going wrong? Is this due to the school not instilling the values effectively in their students? Or is there too strong of an influence coming from outside sources that display opposing values such as the media and porn? What do you think a school’s role is when it comes to values? This post really made me think and I feel it’s something that is always important to be aware of, and to be consistently analysing

  • May – There are two sides to every story. It’s a cliche, but cliches arise for a reason. How often do you make an assumption or judgement without talking to everyone involved, having every piece of information needed to form a fair and fully rounded opinion? How often do we only see the world around us and not look for a narrative that lies outside of the one we experience everyday? The danger of a single story touches upon how impressionable we are to the stories we hear, and why it is therefore so important to expose ourselves to as many differing stories as possible. The number of perspectives we interact with directly affect our understanding of the world and interactions with others. This post has a wonderful Ted Talk from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie explaining the danger of a single story. Thank you for this post, Sarah Whiting. This video really made me question how I form opinions, and how quickly judgements are made – something we should all try and be as mindful as possible about

  • June – Identity from Monika Kern looked at just that – what defines us as individuals? Is it nature or nurture? Does it change over time? And, more specifically, how do culture and ethnicity play a part? This is particularly relevant within education. In New Zealand, there is an issue around the lower achievement rates of Māori and Pacific Island students. How do the cultural identities and stereotypes of educators influence how they help these students achieve their goals? There is also the issue of how we actually define a cultural identity – is this where you grew up, your ancestry, the passport you hold etc.? Culture plays such an important in our lives and in education and is definitely something we need to continue to explore and always be aware of

  • July – Ask, don’t tell looks at the importance of allowing students to take initiative. Teachers can often overlook the importance of giving students guidance and support to reach a decision themselves, and garner important skills in the process, rather than telling them the correct thing to do. Giving students responsibility to make their own decisions and have input is key in developing learner agency and fostering an inquiry disposition in students. Jan-Marie Kellow gives us some great examples and resources of how teachers can aid this process, as well as some insightful reasoning as to why it is so vital

  • August – Increasing student agency for students with special education needs looked at how to increase the initiative of students with learning difficulties. Student agency generally looks to involve the student more and make the activity about them rather than about the teacher, resource or outside influence. It gives students ownership and allows them to intervene in their own learning experience. However, this takes on a unique challenge for Lorraine Vickery, who is working with students with a range of special education needs. Lorraine states it can be as complicated as students being able to determine their own learning program, to making the subject accessible enough that students feel that they can take charge or as simple as students being able to self-start on their own learning. Lorraine pondered upon how she can help her students achieve agency and what the next steps may be

  • September – Joanna Wheway took us along with her on her journey to starting in her first role as principal at a new school this year. We’ve heard about Joanna’s transition in to a new school and all the admin-invoked stress that comes with this. We’ve also followed Joanna as she moved into the harder hitting stuff with her staff. Joanna cleverly decided to spend the first few weeks of her new appointment focusing on the basic areas which teachers are less passionate about. She used this non-conflicting time to build trust and relationships with her staff. And then, the time came to start focusing on the actual teaching and learning aspect of the school – the emotive stuff. Joanna was looking at changing habits in her teachers which have been firmly engraved over the last three years. This was made even more difficult given the fact that they have received positive feedback from previous leaders. Joanna’s main challenge was implementing assessment in a school that had none. Joanna talked of a conflicted teaching staff and the need for her to continuously re-evaluate and take gentle steps towards her goal. Fortunately, in her follow up post it sounds like a breakthrough has been made and things are moving in the right direction. Go to Joanna’s profile to follow all the great posts on her journey as an educator

  • October – Investigating my values and how they influence my work from Rick Whalley looked at the process of aligning personal values with that of your work. This process aims to help you ‘find yourself in your work.’ The process saw Rick identifying the values that were most important to him and then cross referencing them to the values his education organisation associates with. There was then a hard process of elimination to really get down to the values that were most important to Rick. In his post Rick talked us through this process, his values and also how this then went on to influence Rick’s work and have a bigger impact

  • November – Adam Fletcher introduced a conceptualization of cascading leadership among students. Cascading leadership is the experience of having students facilitate other students in a sequenced way according to their skills, knowledge, and experience. It is different from traditional leadership, which is generally having students command other students according to their interest and ability. In this post, Adam explained the idea and the effects it can have, particularly in promoting student voice

What’s on?

Lots of other things happening (online courses, conferences and other opportunities). Including the INTCESS 2018- 5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SCIENCES taking place on February 5th, 2018.

Please feel free to add events to share them, or just let me know and I’ll add them :-)

Nāku iti nei, faafetai lava, and warm regards
Hazel, Charlotte, and the Ethos team,

Charlotte Caines
Community Coordinator
Ethos Consultancy NZ Ltd

PO Box 90391, Victoria Street West,
Auckland 1142
Phone +64 (0)9 9738027 / +64 (0)9 5750206
Mobile +64 (0)21 2273777
Web site: http://www.ethosconsultancynz.com/
Blog: http://ictelt.blogspot.com/
Email addresses: info@ethosconsultancynz.com / hazelowendmc@gmail.com
Skype: hazelowendmc

December 5, 2017

Your Ethos Community Newsletter For November

Another one for my Kiwi readers.

Your newsletter from the Ethos Online Community – November 2017

Kia ora, talofa lava, and greetings,

And so it officially begins – the month of Christmas carols, mad dashes to over crowded malls and far too many events! I hope you’re surviving the chaos and have your eye on the prize – that little break at the end of the month.

If, like me, you’re of the introverted ilk and find the heavy social period a little exhausting, take a look at this article on surviving Christmas as an introvert. This can be one of the most stressful / tiring periods if you get your energy from being alone, but there are plenty of strategies to help face it full on and actually help you get some enjoyment from it too.

Particularly in New Zealand, due to our long summer break, there also seems to be the mad dash to get a lot of work done in a short amount of time. And, if you’re finding the work / life chaos is all a bit much and your brain is screaming ‘enough’, Sarah Whiting has shared a great post all about how to deal when there is just too much going on in your brain –  Brain Overload- How We Can Help Our Minds in Busy Times. Sometimes your poor old brain runs out of room and you need to find ways to order and priorities the many thoughts / tasks you are concentrating on. Relevant year-round (unfortunately) but perhaps now is a good time to start putting these measures in place.

And, if you need a little r&r to get you in the spirit, John S Oliver has linked us to some great videos and tips on practicing the meditative art of Qigong –  Consider this alternative to yoga. John prefers to practice this over yoga and finds it calming – perhaps you will too?

As always, there are plenty of fabulous other posts, so sit down, grab a cuppa, take a break from the December madness and reflect on the month that was, here at Ethos.

Welcome to new members – November

The Ethos Online Community now has 449 members. Hope you will all give a warm haere mai (welcome) to the new members to the community:

  • Kaye  Gilhooley, an Educational Product Developer based in Christchurch. Kaye is particularly interested in Instructional Design and blended learning approaches

Know anyone who would like to join an international Online Community that’s all about learning – across all education sectors, business & ITOs: http://bit.ly/233qpfP? Please invite them :)

Member Blog Posts and discussions

In this newsletter, as always, we have some interesting posts. Please jump into the conversations and feel free to ask questions.

  • Eduspeak unlocks the education-focused lingo that people outside for the profession may not always understand. I personally found this very helpful. Thanks Leigh Hynes for sharing

  • ePortfolios make learning visible to their users. They also make their user visible, being able to describe not just what they do but how and why they do it, self managing and reflecting. Being proactive. MyPortfolio trainer and eportfolio facilitator, Pascale Hyboud Peron, shares a great poster looking into the why, who and how of ePortfolios in ePortfolio for life?

  • Fancy yourself a movie buff? Or perhaps you have a student with an interest that you’d like to help blossom? Either way, this blog by John S Oliver should spark some interest. If you enjoy movies, then consider these looks at the various roles involved in movie making as well as the in-depth process it takes to get from idea to movie screen. John links us to 12 Crash Course lessons to help bring out the Speilburg in all of us

  • Rachel Whalley checks in with an update on her awesome work with the VLN primary school in What’s new online learning in NZ primary schools. There has been farm animals attending the school, as well as much prep for 2018 and some interesting research and findings. There are a wide range of online language programmes, in addition – extension maths, astronomy, visual arts, computer programming, health and Over the Back Fence Project. Registrations for 2018 are now open, so make sure to check it out here

  • Often find it hard to concentrate effectively on one thing in amongst the million other things happening in your head? Well, the good news if you’re not alone. And the even better news is Sarah Whiting is here to help. All it takes is some conscious decision making in organising your day. Take a look at Brain Overload- How We Can Help Our Minds in Busy Times to get some tips on escaping the brain burnout!

  • Adam Fletcher introduces a conceptualization of cascading leadership among students. Cascading leadership is the experience of having students facilitate other students in a sequenced way according to their skills, knowledge, and experience. It is different from traditional leadership, which is generally having students command other students according to their interest and ability. In this post, Adam explains the idea and the effects it can have, particularly in promoting student voice

  • Yoga has gone from something thought of as a hippy’s pass time, to a mainstream activity with widely recognised benefits. So, what’s the next yoga? Well if you were to ask John S Oliver, Qigong would be the answer. Qigong is a holistic system of coordinated body posture and movement, breathing, and meditation. John shares some videos and exercises in Consider this alternative to yoga

Also recommended

As always you have contributed a superb variety of posts this month. Thank you. Here are some of the posts and topics that you may find of interest:

  • In this podcast (that was shared by Mike Preece), some key points arise about providing learning opportunities across all sociocultural groups in New Zealand…in particular those who are facing socio-economic disadvantages. The link between provision of professional development and shifts in student achievement are discussed, and it was recognised that it is tough to demonstrate this shift using standardised tests. Find out more; Education under discussion: Links between professional development and helping to lift student ‘achievement’?

  • Mentoring and coaching have received a lot of attention recently on the Ethos community, so this post seemed particularly relevant. Conor Neill, in this video, outlines his thoughts about what a mentor comprises, and why we might need them in our lives. Connor suggests there are three types on mentors, and five roles they play. Take a look at the video or a quick read of the blog (Three types of mentor, and five types of role they play) and let us know your thoughts

  • Anxiety is sadly becoming a hugely common affliction. Are you ever pulled into that cycle of anxiety – that ‘what if…’ cycle that makes your stomach churn and your heart beat faster? If yes, you may well find the following resource of interest. In caught in the anxiety cycle? Find out what to do.. we look at the work of Dr. Neha Sangwan on how to transform your anxiety

Recommended videos

From the ever growing repository of videos (1,557 in total – thanks as always to John S Oliver for his awesome contributions), these are a just few of the highlights.

  • In this video we are shown a very simple technique to teach children to read. Teach your child to read phonetically in just one minute a day of practice you can have your child reading two and three letter words

  • If your kid wasn’t born to wait, you’re not alone. Good news is that patience is actually a skill you can teach and Sofia shares with us 3 simple and fun ways to do so in 3 Ways to Teach Kids PATIENCE!

  • Teachers unions vs. students – there is a dilemma in American education. On the one hand, teachers are essential to student achievement. On the other, teachers unions promote self-interests of their members which are antithetical to the interests of students. So, how do we fix this problem? In five minutes, Terry Moe, Professor of Political Science at Stanford University, delineates this quandary and offers solutions.

  • This presentation is erudite, humorous, and it has the data to support the innovative approaches that the school has trialled. Highly, highly recommended; Supporting students to take control of their own learning

  • 7 undeniable reasons young people will save their parents and the world – Jan Owen AM commenced as CEO at The Foundation for Young Australians in September 2010. She is recognised as one of the leading pioneers of Australia’s youth sector, having headed up Australia’s first youth representative bodies, as Chairperson of the National Youth Council of Australia and President of the Youth Affairs Council of Australia. Since 2002, Jan has been the Executive Director of Social Ventures Australia, an organisation that has pioneered new investment, social innovation and entrepreneurship models to increase the impact of the social sector

  • The traditional system of education was designed in the industrial age and is now outdated and ineffective. Learn about the 6 major problems with the system.  At NEXT School, they are bringing a much needed upgrade to the education system to address these problems. They are India’s 1st Big Picture School. The highly innovative Big Picture Learning framework allows us to personalise each child’s educational journey making learning more engaging and relevant. Learn more in this blog post – 6 Problems with our School System

Resources

  • Are you looking for Virtual Classroom, Online Teaching or Training solutions? Vinay Kumar introduces us to WizIQ, which was awarded the World’s Best Virtual Classroom Provider in Global E-Learning Awards. To enhance the educational E-Learning and training process, WizIQ provides you with asynchronous communication tools. Take a read of WizIQ Virtual Classroom Solution for Teaching & Learning to find out more

  • If you are involved in facilitating an online community, are thinking of initiating one, or are working with, for example, students who would like to get one going…these guidelines may serve as a ‘quick guide’ of things to think about in advance- The Virtual CoP Toolbox – Guidelines for online community builders

What’s on?

Lots of other things happening (online courses, conferences and other opportunities) including next year’s INTCESS 2018- 5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SCIENCES taking place in Istanbul

Please feel free to add events to share them, or just let me know and I’ll add them :-)

Nāku iti nei, faafetai lava, and warm regards

Charlotte

Charlotte Caines
Community Coordinator

Ethos Consultancy NZ Ltd

PO Box 90391, Victoria Street West,
Auckland 1142
Phone +64 (0)9 9738027 / +64 (0)9 5750206
Mobile +64 (0)21 2273777
Web site: http://www.ethosconsultancynz.com/
Blog: http://ictelt.blogspot.com/
Email addresses: info@ethosconsultancynz.com / hazelowendmc@gmail.com
Skype: hazelowendmc

November 5, 2017

Your Ethos Community Newsletter For October

Another one for my Kiwi readers.

Your newsletter from the Ethos Online Community – October 2017

 

Kia ora, talofa lava, and greetings,

 

It may only be the beginning of November, but it feels like the silly season is well and truly upon us. There are already events galore and the mad-dash to get an insane amount of work done before the break has really kicked off.

 

The next two months are inevitably set to get increasingly chaotic. Luckily, John S Oliver has supplied a myriad of videos on retaining information. I have a sinking feeling that these will be well-needed in the build up to Christmas.

 

In amongst the madness, don’t forget the importance of taking some time for yourself. It’s all too easy to forget that your own health and wellbeing should be priority one. Joanna Wheway shares a survey that makes this even more poignant. In Principal Wellbeing Joanna links us to the survey, revealing the high stress levels principals are under. I fear this is a trend that leaks into many professions nowadays. While a certain amount of stress can be good, we all need to remember how to achieve balance and not burn ourselves out, particularly at this end of the year.

 

Try your best to make sure you are getting some value and enjoyment from your work too (not just stress!). This month Rick Whalley posts about a process he undertook to ensure that his own values aligned with that of his work; Investigating my values and how they influence my work. These kind of activities can aid you both professionally and personally, helping you perform better and feel more in sync with the work you’re doing.

 

So, embrace the chaos that is bound to ensue in the remaining months of 2017, but ensure you’re looking after yourself and doing all you need to be happy and healthy. Hopefully, there is at least an abundance of food, drink and good times with friends that come with end of year celebrations – so take advantage of these silver linings between getting all your work done. Let’s all keep in mind that end of year break and (hopefully) sunshine (in some parts of the world) to motivate us through!

 

Welcome to new members – October

The Ethos Online Community now has 448 members. Hope you will all give a warm haere mai (welcome) to the new members to the community:

  • Ellie Summers, a Graphic Designer based in London. Ellie hopes Ethos and ICT enhanced learning and technology can help her share knowledge with the world

  • Another London-dweller, Website Media Manager,  Peter S joins us also. Peter would like to help people of all ages learn how to use the internet better and in a more secure way

 

Know anyone who would like to join an international Online Community that’s all about learning – across all education sectors, business & ITOs: http://bit.ly/233qpfP? Please invite them :)

Member Blog Posts and discussions

In this newsletter, as always, we have some interesting posts. Please jump into the conversations and feel free to ask questions.

  • Want to be equally disgusted and fascinated? Well then this is the post for you! Ellie Summers shares with us a fabulously off-putting infographic spelling out 20 gross and gruesome facts about the human body. A good one to both entertain and educate.

  • Peter S cements his passion for aiding safe and effective internet use by posting this great internet safety guide: Internet safety for kids and teens. This is a topic that is always relevant, particularly with the ever-morphing face of technology. This guide should help guardians and teachers keep up with new technologies and know how to both protect younger internet users, and support them to become more savvy.

  • Recruitment and retention is generally a priority for most businesses. It certainly is for John Owen and his growing business. When considering the right employee value proposition, John knew that, just like the other elements of his company, he wanted to try something a little new and different. One of the things John’s company, Cyma, offers to employees is coaching. However, while most companies offer this only to senior staff, Cyma have decided to open this up to all staff – the thinking being that if senior staff members find it beneficial, why wouldn’t everyone!? The result has been fantastic, with a great deal of positive feedback received. John explains more about their method, reasoning and results in Coaching for everyone, not just leadership.

  • Joanna Wheway writes about an interesting (and terrifying) survey revealing the stress levels of school principals. And it’s not looking good. Luckily the author, Dr Phil Riley, also has some tips on how to reduce said stress. Joanna also links us to another great website with guides on how to survive a stressful environment. You can find all the info here: Principal Wellbeing. Remember to get some R&R and always put your health and wellbeing first.

  • Investigating my values and how they influence my work from Rick Whalley looks at the process of aligning personal values with that of your work. This process aims to help you ‘find yourself in your work.’ The process saw Rick identifying the values that were most important to him and then cross referencing them to the values his education organisation associates with. There was then a hard process of elimination to really get down to the values that were most important to Rick. In his post Rick talks us through this process, his values and also how this then goes on to influence Rick’s work and have a bigger impact.

  • The transition to secondary school is always a big one. This becomes even more daunting for those with learning disabilities or who need extra support in making big, impactful decisions. Lorraine Vickery decided to use the MAPS tool to help her year 9 students and their support groups make difficult decisions throughout this transition that could ultimately affect their place in society. This tool looks to help individuals with disabilities who are at risk of being isolated, left out of mainstream life, to realise their future goals and make plans to achieve their goals. Lorraine talks more in depth about the process and the results in her posts: Students being able to determine their own learning program, Preparation for the MAPS process and “All I want is a Good Life”.

 

Also recommended

As always you have contributed a superb variety of posts this month. Thank you. Here are some of the posts and topics that you may find of interest:

  • Acknowledging that change needs to be made is easy, but actually knowing how to implement this is another (more challenging) story. Joanna Wheway ponders on how one goes about finding the path to change once in a position to make change.

  • You may have seen the recent post What does business look like when driven and funded by women? Well, SheEO is now active in Aotearoa New Zealand, and if you have a business idea you now have the opportunity to apply for one of the low-interest loans, while being supported by an experienced community of women. A super exciting chance to get your business underway, I’d highly recommend you jump in and apply.

  • What sets apart good leaders from great leaders? Is it political savvy and the ability to maneuver their way to the top? Is it the number of connections they have? Is it their ability to speak well and motivate people?While all these things may be helpful to varying degrees, leadership goes much deeper than that, to the very core of a who a person is. Here are five traits that truly set apart great leaders from the rest of the pack: 5 traits of leadership that will set you apart.

  • Meeting the needs of culturally diverse clients by enhancing employee cultural understandings looks at how coaching, with its focus on listening, questioning, and exploration of self, especially values and beliefs, can be a highly effective way to develop understanding of a range of cultures. This in turn can have a hugely positive influence of a person’s ability to communicate in different manners and form relationships. This post analyses how this can help with short- and long-term business development, especially around decision-making, planning and operations

  • Online courses are an amazing resource, but the questions is ‘how do you make them sticky’? How do you help participants, after they have started your course, remain engaged and motivated? Hazel  shares her Top 10 tips for online course design, all taken from either her own work with clients to add them to their course design, or experiences in other courses

 

Recommended videos

From the ever growing repository of videos (1,523 in total – thanks as always to John S Oliver for his awesome contributions), these are a just few of the highlights.

 

Resources

  • You may be familiar with the amazing work done by Adam Fletcher around student voice, and his keen interest in personal engagement in education for K-12 students, as well as adult learners. Well, we were very excited when Adam dropped us a line sharing his new book called Student Voice Revolution: The Meaningful Student Involvement Handbook. He writes that “clocking in at 374 pages, it’s packed with research, examples, tools and more to help districts [regions], schools and individual teachers take steps forward to fully embrace Meaningful Student Involvement. There are exciting graphics, engaging stories and powerful citations throughout the book, too”. Find out more here.

  • Are you looking for a short, online course to study…and that is, even better, free? Open2Study has an interesting variety of courses from which to choose. Take a look at the options – Free, short, online courses available for you

  • This is a great little site that looks to link qualified freelancers and companies (free of charge too!). The resource, Hubstaff Talent, has build a directory of tried and tested trustworthy freelance workers

 

What’s on?

Lots of other things happening (online courses, conferences and other opportunities) including the ASCILITE 2017: 34th International Conference on Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education taking place on December 4th in Queensland, Australia.

Please feel free to add events to share them, or just let me know and I’ll add them :-)

 

 

Nāku iti nei, faafetai lava, and warm regards

Charlotte

Charlotte Caines

Community Coordinator

Ethos Consultancy NZ Ltd

PO Box 90391, Victoria Street West,

Auckland 1142

Phone +64 (0)9 9738027 / +64 (0)9 5750206

Mobile +64 (0)21 2273777

Web site: http://www.ethosconsultancynz.com/

Blog: http://ictelt.blogspot.com/

Email addresses: info@ethosconsultancynz.com / hazelowendmc@gmail.com

Skype: hazelowendmc

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