Virtual School Meanderings

May 2, 2019

AERA Highlights: 2020 Annual Meeting Theme Released, Shaun Harper Voted AERA President-Elect, And More!

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April 2019

AERA News
2019 Annual Meeting News
Research Policy and Funding News
AERA Calls
AERA Publications Calls
Beyond AERA
AERA in the News

 

AERA News

2020 Annual Meeting Theme Released; Call for Submissions Coming May 10

The 2020 Annual Meeting theme—“The Power and Possibilities for the Public Good When Researchers and Organizational Stakeholders Collaborate”—is a call to “to address educational challenges through policy and community engagement and to work with diverse institutional and organizational stakeholders.”

Shaun Harper Voted AERA President-Elect; Key Members Elected to AERA Council

Shaun Harper, a Provost Professor in the Rossier School of Education and Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California, has been voted president-elect of AERA. Read more

2019 Annual Meeting News

More than 14,000 Education Researchers Drawn to Toronto for AERA Annual Meeting​

The 2019 AERA Annual Meeting brought more than 14,000 scholars, policy leaders, students, and practitioners to Toronto, Canada, for the largest education research conference in the world, offering five days of stimulating discussion, exchange, and professional development. Read more

Opening Plenary Examines the Power of Educational Institutions to Inflict and Heal Racial Injustices

The 2019 Annual Meeting’s Opening Plenary session, “Truth and Reconciliation in Education: History, Narratives, and Pedagogy,” addressed the meaning of truth and reconciliation in the field of education and the power of educational institutions to both inflict and heal racial injustices. Read more

AERA 2019 President Wells Scrutinizes School Testing Policies

In this year’s Presidential Address, “An Inconvenient Truth About the New Jim Crow of Education,” 2019 AERA President Amy Stuart Wells (Teachers College, Columbia University) scrutinized testing policies in education, suggesting that standardized testing, with its perpetuation of an unequal education system for students of color, is the new “Jim Crow” of education. Read more

Town Hall Participants Assess Progress in, and Next Steps for, Addressing Sexual Harassment in Academe

The AERA Annual Meeting featured a Town Hall session titled “Sexual Harassment and Climate Change in Scholarly Associations and the Academy.” Read more

Gun Violence Town Hall Takes Stock of School Safety Research and Practices

With gun violence and school safety still among the top concerns of educators and policy leaders, AERA held an Annual Meeting Town Hall on April 8 to examine the dynamics and patterns of gun violence in schools and communities in the United States, take stock of promising policy and societal developments, and scrutinize emerging research addressing the consequences of gun violence. Read more

Major Annual Meeting Lecture Speakers Discuss Issues of Race in Education

The AERA Distinguished Lecture and the AERA Wallace Foundation Lecture featured prominent scholars engaging meeting attendees in important conversations about race, racism, microaggressions, and education at this year’s Annual Meeting in Toronto. Read more

Research and Science Policy Forum Engages Attendees in Major Issues in Education Research

The 2019 AERA Annual Meeting included 24 invited sessions as part of its Research and Science Policy Forum, featuring new reports from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; updates from federal agency representatives; and discussion on open knowledge. Read more

Research Policy and Funding News

AERA Continues Action on FY 2020 Appropriations

In April, AERA submitted written testimony to the House subcommittees that support key federal agencies that advance education research and statistical infrastructure. Read more

Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019 Introduced in Senate; AERA Among Endorsers

On April 4, Sens. Kamala Harris (D-CA), Jacky Rosen (D-NV), and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) announced the introduction of the Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019. AERA is a supporter of the legislation. Read more

AERA Calls
AERA Publications Calls
Beyond AERA
AERA in the News

Recent media coverage of AERA and AERA-published research

 

More AERA in the News

 

AERA Highlights is published by the American Educational Research Association monthly to inform members and others interested in education research about the latest news and developments in AERA and in the field.

Editor: Felice J. Levine

Managing Editors: Tony Pals and John Neikirk

Contributors: Collin Boylin, Jessica Sibold, Christy Talbot, and Martha Yager

 

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April 9, 2019

AERA 2019 – Unpacking The Discourse Of Isolated Educators After They Become Networked

The fifteenth and final K-12 distance, online and/or blended learning session from the 2019 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association that I am blogging about is:

Unpacking the Discourse of Isolated Educators After They Become Networked

  • In Event: 75.043 – MTCC Poster Session 17
    In Poster Session: 75.043-10 – Section 8 Poster Session 3

Tue, April 9, 8:00 to 9:30am, Metro Toronto Convention Centre, 300 Level, Hall C

Abstract

This study explored the discourse of a group of educators, all of whose roles inhibited their participation in professional communities at either the school or district level after they joined virtual professional communities (VPCs). The two VPCs in question included one for mentors who supported online learners, and one for early literacy coaches who worked with teachers to improve literacy instruction. Focusing primarily on textual data that was created by the participants as a result of interactions, the researcher used text-mining techniques to discern their most frequently uttered words and their correlated words. The findings reveal that members exchanged high quality practical knowledge and ideas about professional identity. Areas in which the VPCs could be improved are also discussed.

Author

  • Jemma Bae Kwon, Michigan Virtual

I am presenting during this time slot.  So I am hoping that someone who is in the room might be able to post their notes in the comments area below.

AERA 2019 – Quasi-Experimental Evaluation Of Usage Of Virtual Learning Environments: A Latent Class Approach With Inverse Probability Of Treatment Weighting

The fourteenth K-12 distance, online and/or blended learning session from the 2019 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association that I am blogging about is:

Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of Usage of Virtual Learning Environments: A Latent Class Approach With Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighting

  • In Event: 75.043 – MTCC Poster Session 17
    In Poster Session: 75.043-1 – Advanced Studies of National Databases Poster Session

Tue, April 9, 8:00 to 9:30am, Metro Toronto Convention Centre, 300 Level, Hall C

Abstract

Within the last decade, there has been a fast proliferation of virtual learning environments (VLE), such as virtual schools, e-learning management systems, intelligent tutoring systems, and massive open online courses (MOOCs). The objective of this study is to demonstrate a method to identify latent classes of VLE users at the student and teacher levels, and estimate the effects of VLE usage on educational achievement using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) to remove selection bias combined with multilevel structural equation modeling. The objective is accomplished through analyses of 2016/2017 usage data from the Algebra Nation tutoring program, which is state-funded and widely used in Florida, and student Algebra I End-of-Course Assessment (EOC) scores obtained from the Florida Department of Education.

Authors

  • Walter L. Leite, University of Florida
  • Dee Duygu Cetin-Berber, University of Florida
  • Corinne Huggins-Manley, University of Florida
  • Carole R. Beal, University of Florida

I am presenting during this time slot.  So I am hoping that someone who is in the room might be able to post their notes in the comments area below.

AERA 2019 – The Impact Of Prolonged Poverty On The Mathematics Academic Performance Of Online Students

The thirteenth K-12 distance, online and/or blended learning session from the 2019 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association that I am blogging about is:

The Impact of Prolonged Poverty on the Mathematics Academic Performance of Online Students

  • In Event: 75.036 – Learning Mathematics, Reading, and Foreign Languages

Tue, April 9, 8:00 to 9:30am, Metro Toronto Convention Centre, 600 Level, Room 603

Abstract

As the K-12 online learning student population increases so does the diversity of students choosing to school online. This shift in student population includes students who are considered economically disadvantaged. This research study examines the impact of prolonged poverty (3 years of being economically disadvantaged) on the mathematics achievement of online students in grades 3 through 8.

Author

  • Elizabeth Anderson, K12 Inc.

Elizabeth introduced her session by stating that this presentation was based on a white paper that was published by K12, Inc., which she described as a for profit vendor that operated online charter schools – specifically 65 schools in 35 states.  This study looked at only 8 schools.  The purpose of this study was to examine mathematics performance by those students that were consistently disadvantaged.

Elizabeth explained that initially students that enrolled in the K12, Inc. schools were typical or average students.  But as time went on, there were more and more challenged students enrolling in K12, Inc..  In her role at the company, school leaders come to her with problems or questions, and she is responsible for selecting projects and examining the data to see if they can find trends and possible solution.

The study itself was informed by a policy change in Michigan that reexamined the definition of being at-risk.  The research question for the study focused on whether students who were in poverty over time had lower academic performance than other groups of students.  The students who participated in the study were only ones that had spent three consecutive years at a K12, Inc. school.  As a part of the analysis, the results had to be normalized using a Z score to allow comparisons across states (and because of a change in state testing in seven of the eight states).  Various other variables, such as special education designation, were controlled for.

The results showed that from year one to year two there was a similar increase or growth in student performance, but also that the students that had never been disadvantaged scored consistency higher.  From year two to year three there was a significant decline in student performance for both groups – and the persistently disadvantaged students had a bigger drop (i.e., the gap increased).  The students that had never been disadvantaged again scored higher.  Elizabeth attributed the group in both groups to the change in state testing in seven of the eight states in the third year, all of which were perceived to be rigorous than the previous testing.

Overall, Elizabeth indicated that the performance after enrolling in K12, Inc. that students performance growth or decline was relatively consistent in both groups (i.e., the line slopes up or down on relatively the same angle on a bar chart), but that students who were persistently disadvantaged began their journey with K12, Inc. so far behind in terms of performance than their never been disadvantaged counterparts.

AERA 2019 – Learning To Teach Mathematics: Face-To-Face, Hybrid, And Online

The twelfth K-12 distance, online and/or blended learning session from the 2019 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association that I am blogging about is:

Learning to Teach Mathematics: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, and Online

  • In Event: 75.036 – Learning Mathematics, Reading, and Foreign Languages

Tue, April 9, 8:00 to 9:30am, Metro Toronto Convention Centre, 600 Level, Room 603

Abstract

The increase of online education in K-12 schools and in teacher education programs has been dramatic. This study compared the pedagogical content knowledge of the pre-service teachers enrolled in a mathematics methods course offered in three different course formats: face-to-face, hybrid and online. Findings suggested significant growth from pre to post tests across all three different course formats. There were no interaction effect regardless of duration or course section. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the learning outcomes when the meeting time was reduced to 1/3 and the meeting was conducted online. This study adds to the literature on the equivalence of delivery formats of pre-service teacher education courses.

Authors

  • Xiaofang Zeng, Texas Tech University
  • Raymond Flores, Texas Tech University
  • Jian Wang, Texas Tech University

This was a study that was funded by Academic Partnership.  Xiaofang began by explaining that most teacher education programs use a credit-based model, but not a competency-based learning (CBL) model to assess a candidates knowledge, skills, and abilities.  Higher education makes them pay and stay in courses that they have already mastered the content.  At the K-12 level, there has been a push to implement CBL…  But this push hasn’t gotten a lot of traction in the higher education education context.

Jian took us through one of the history and theoretical framework for CBL, while Xiaofang described some of the benefits CBL and some of the important factors that need to be considered when implementing CBL.

The methodology that was used was a pre-experimental model.  The first phase was the initial development of the CBL environment, the second phase was the implementation of CBL, and then the third phase was an evaluation.

The initial development of the CBL course was designed, with the assessments aligned to the specific specialist program association and CAEP.  The focus on CAEP placed a larger emphasis on the assessments and their validity.

One of the interesting things from phase two was the fact that many students would complete the assessment to measure their CBL and reach the standard needed, but the students to re-take the assessment to get an even higher score (even though they had reached the benchmark for showing their mastery).

I gave up taking notes at this point because they were three quarters of the way through and beyond some reference in the abstract, this was not a K-12 focused session.

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