Virtual School Meanderings

April 27, 2017

AERA 2017 – Cross-Classified Multilevel Modeling for Program Evaluation of State Virtual School

So the second session I’m blogging at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) is:

Cross-Classified Multilevel Modeling for Program Evaluation of State Virtual School

  • In Event: Poster Session 3
    In Poster Session: 18.073-10 – Applied Research in School: Education Policy and School Context

Thu, April 27, 4:05 to 5:35pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 2

Abstract

The author examined institutional performance of a state virtual school using data from the learning management and customer management systems. To address the unique structure of virtual school data, the cross-classified multilevel modeling was used. Key findings include: (a) students who took courses for the credit recovery or learning preference are more likely to underperform in comparison to those with such reasons as schedule conflicts or unavailable courses at their schools; (b) female students are more likely to succeed; and (c) novice teachers with supports via the institute’s induction program performed as well as other experienced teachers can. The author is calling for more research on K-12 online learner’s attributes and the factors that account for the student success.

Author

  • Jungah Bae

Now I have no notes on this session, as I am still in California.  However, if you are in this session, please post your notes in the comments below.

AERA 2017 – Conjuring Students: The Politics of Presence in Online K–12 Teaching

So I’m not actually arriving at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) this year until Sunday (as I wanted to minimize my time away from the office). But since it does begin today, I wanted to start blogging the K-12 online learning sessions.  The first session I’m blogging is:

Conjuring Students: The Politics of Presence in Online K–12 Teaching

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 2
    In Roundtable Session: 14.045-14 – The Power in Their Actions: The Role of Teachers’ Theorizing and Action in Mediating Successful Practices

Thu, April 27, 12:00 to 1:30pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 3

Abstract

The seemingly simple question of whether or not a child is present in a classroom has become a critical issue for schools and teachers. School funding calculations and definitions of teachers’ work have long been premised on the physical co-presence of teachers and students. But in online schools, students across a state attend the same “virtual” school, participate from their homes, and complete coursework at their own pace.
Drawing on interviews with 22 teachers from 10 online schools in Ohio, this article traces how the physical separation and technology-mediated interaction of teachers and students change the social and political contexts of teaching. How do online schools and teachers make students appear as subjects of instruction, and as legally accountable attendees?

Authors

  • Jan K. Nespor, The Ohio State University
  • Rick J. Voithofer, The Ohio State University

Now I have no notes on this session, as I am still in California.  However, if you are in this session, please post your notes in the comments below.

AERA 2017 And K-12 Online Learning

Since the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) begins today, I figured that I should post all of the K-12 online learning focused sessions I could find from the online program.  I searched for the usual suspect, as well as searching for terms like “virtual school.” “cyber school,” “online school,” “cyber charter school,” virtual charter school,” and “K-12 online learning.”  if I have missed any, add them in the comments below.

Thursday, 27 April 2017

Conjuring Students: The Politics of Presence in Online K–12 Teaching

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 2
    In Roundtable Session: 14.045-14 – The Power in Their Actions: The Role of Teachers’ Theorizing and Action in Mediating Successful Practices

Thu, April 27, 12:00 to 1:30pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 3

Abstract

The seemingly simple question of whether or not a child is present in a classroom has become a critical issue for schools and teachers. School funding calculations and definitions of teachers’ work have long been premised on the physical co-presence of teachers and students. But in online schools, students across a state attend the same “virtual” school, participate from their homes, and complete coursework at their own pace.
Drawing on interviews with 22 teachers from 10 online schools in Ohio, this article traces how the physical separation and technology-mediated interaction of teachers and students change the social and political contexts of teaching. How do online schools and teachers make students appear as subjects of instruction, and as legally accountable attendees?

Authors

  • Jan K. Nespor, The Ohio State University
  • Rick J. Voithofer, The Ohio State University

Cross-Classified Multilevel Modeling for Program Evaluation of State Virtual School

  • In Event: Poster Session 3
    In Poster Session: 18.073-10 – Applied Research in School: Education Policy and School Context

Thu, April 27, 4:05 to 5:35pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 2

Abstract

The author examined institutional performance of a state virtual school using data from the learning management and customer management systems. To address the unique structure of virtual school data, the cross-classified multilevel modeling was used. Key findings include: (a) students who took courses for the credit recovery or learning preference are more likely to underperform in comparison to those with such reasons as schedule conflicts or unavailable courses at their schools; (b) female students are more likely to succeed; and (c) novice teachers with supports via the institute’s induction program performed as well as other experienced teachers can. The author is calling for more research on K-12 online learner’s attributes and the factors that account for the student success.

Author

  • Jungah Bae

Friday, 28 April 2017

Online Learning and Requesting Accommodations for College Students With Disabilities

  • In Event: Promoting Student Success

Fri, April 28, 10:35am to 12:05pm, Grand Hyatt San Antonio, Fourth Floor, Republic C

Abstract

Online learning has increased access to non-traditional student populations in higher education but it appears that students with disabilities may have been overlooked in the rapid expansion. Access to higher education via online learning does not necessarily equate to this access being accessible to students with disabilities. The current study examines how perceptions and attitudes toward requesting accommodations in the online learning environment predict whether students with disabilities report requesting accommodations in these environments. We statistically control for student attitudes toward requesting accommodations in the face to face learning environment. Results indicate that perceptions and attitudes toward requesting accommodations in the online learning environment do predict whether students with disabilities report requesting accommodations.

Authors

  • Lucy M. Barnard-Brak, Texas Tech University
  • Rosario Moreno, Texas Tech University

Teaching in Niches: New Divisions of Teachers’ Work in Online K–12 Schools

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 10
    In Roundtable Session: 30.080-16 – Various Approaches to Reflecting on, Measuring, and Sharing Teacher Identities

Fri, April 28, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 1

Abstract

Online education is often described as serving neglected categories of students, and thus filling formerly unoccupied niches in the education system – a way of ‘achieving equal educational opportunity.’ Using data from a study of 22 teachers across 10 virtual schools in Ohio, as wella as document analysis, and evaluation of media representations, this paper examines how the orientations of online K-12 schools towards such niches structure the work of teaching and shape teachers’ “occupational rhetorics.” Our overarching concern is with how such niche populations are discursively and institutionally produced, and how teachers come to shape and interpret their work in terms of these niche populations.

Authors

  • Jan K. Nespor, The Ohio State University
  • Rick J. Voithofer, The Ohio State University

Saturday, 30 April 2017

Extending Scopes: Teachers’ Experience of Teaching Mathematics and Physics in the Israeli Virtual High School

  • In Event: Technology Integration in Mathematics and Computer Science Education

Sat, April 29, 10:35am to 12:05pm, Grand Hyatt San Antonio, Fourth Floor, Crockett D

Abstract

The phenomenon of the growing number of virtual schools engenders new conditions for teaching and learning. It is thus imperative to better understand these conditions and their impact on effective teaching and learning. This paper explores teachers’ experiences of a virtual high school through analyses of qualitative and quantitative data, which include ongoing communications with teachers from the virtual high school, an end-of-year summary meeting, and a 55-item questionnaire. Data analyses yielded several insights that pertain to pedagogical principles in the context of a virtual high school and that include personalized teacher-student relationships, new teaching skills, and emerging pedagogical, administrative, and technological challenges. Implications for providing potentially better conditions for learning in virtual contexts are discussed.

Authors

  • Osnat Fellus, University of Ottawa
  • Yaniv Biton
  • Dafna Raviv, Center for Educational Technology

Sunday, 01 May 2017

Parents’ Use of Litigation to Enhance the Experience of Students With Disabilities in Online Schools

  • In Event: Litigation Trends in K–12 Education Relating to Students With Special Needs and School Privatization

Sun, April 30, 8:15 to 9:45am, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Meeting Room Level, Room 217 B

Abstract

Virtual schooling is gaining in popularity in the United States. Parents increasingly view online schooling as a viable option for their children with disabilities as schools promise to deliver individualized, self-paced instruction and provide additional supports either within the home or at regional centers. Parents play an important role in online schooling because most of this form of education is provided in the child’s home over the Internet. This research analyzes the opportunities and trials of virtual schooling for students with disabilities by examining the legal challenges parents have brought surrounding their participation. It identifies common problems and concludes with suggestions for both parents and schools on structuring a successful experience for students with disabilities in virtual learning environments.

Authors

  • Regina R. Umpstead, Central Michigan University
  • Nicole Snyder, Latsha Davis & McKenna
  • Linda Weiss, Central Michigan University

Investigating the Relationship Between Students’ Online Engagement and Their Online Course Outcomes

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 20
    In Roundtable Session: 52.084-11 – Students’ Perceptions, Outcomes, Online Engagement, and Satisfaction

Sun, April 30, 8:15 to 9:45am, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 3

Abstract

This study used data from the fall 2014 semester at Wisconsin Virtual School to examine whether patterns of student engagement in online courses were associated with course out-comes. Using group-based trajectory modeling, the study found that student enrollments in online courses followed one of six engagement patterns, with average engagement ranging from 1.5 hours to 6 or more hours per week. Most students (77 percent) steadily engaged in their online courses for 1.5 or 2.5 hours per week. Students who engaged in their online course for two or more hours per week had better course outcomes than students who engaged for few-er than two hours per week.

Authors

  • Peggy Clements, American Institutes for Research
  • Heather Lavigne, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Angela Pazzaglia, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Erin Stafford, Education Development Center, Inc.

Online Learning, Achievement, and Innovation in Charter Schools

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 21

Sun, April 30, 10:35am to 12:05pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 1Session Type: Roundtable Session

Sub Unit

  • SIG-Charters & School Choice

Chairs

  • Julie M Kallio, University of Wisconsin – Madison
  • Chris Torres, Michigan State University

Papers

  • Charter Schools’ Innovation Reporting Levels and Student AchievementEinav Danan Cabrera, Florida Virtual School
  • Do Testing Conditions Explain Cyber Charter Schools’ Failing Grades?Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville; Robert A. Maranto, University of Arkansas; Angela Watson, University of Arkansas
  • K–12 Online Learning and School Choice: Growth and Expansion in the Absence of EvidenceMichael Kristopher Barbour, Touro University – California

Who Loses Students to Low-Quality Schools? Relationships Between Cyber Charters and Educational Disadvantage Over Time

  • In Event: School Choice: Politics of Opportunity and Identity

Sun, April 30, 2:15 to 3:45pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Meeting Room Level, Room 216 A

Abstract

This research examines how shifts in knowledge about the quality of a specific school type relate to changes in demographics of school districts that lose students to this school type. To do so, this study analyzes cyber charter school enrollment in Pennsylvania, showing that as the perceived quality of the cyber charter school sector turns negative, the composition of school districts losing students to this sector changes so that educationally disadvantaged districts are more likely to lose a higher proportion of students. These findings have implications for school choice theory in that certain choice decisions may not promote educational improvement if educationally disadvantaged students are offered and make choices that perpetuate their educational disadvantage.

Authors

  • Bryan Arthur Mann, Pennsylvania State University
  • David P. Baker, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Renata Horvatek, The Pennsylvania State University

Monday, 01 May 2017

Mon, May 1, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Grand Hyatt San Antonio, Fourth Floor, Republic B

Virtual Schooling, Instructors’ Practices and Perceptions

View complete session

Chair

  • Barbara Ellen Rowan, Pearson North America

Papers

  • Examining Perspectives of Faculty Regarding Online Program CommunityDoris U. Bolliger, University of Wyoming; Craig Erschel Shepherd, University of Wyoming; H. Victoria Bryant, University of Wyoming
  • Motivational Profiles, Learning Satisfaction, and Learning Outcomes for K–12 Virtual School StudentsYining Zhang, Michigan State University; Chin-Hsi Lin, Michigan State University
  • Elementary Teachers’ Use of the Internet for Literacy Instruction and Professional LearningPamela Beach, Queen’s University
  • Online Teaching and Learning: Instructor Practices That Support the Formation of Virtual CommunitySharla Berry, University of Southern California
  • Virtual Terrains: Learning Mathematics and Physics in the Israeli Virtual High SchoolOsnat Fellus, University of Ottawa; Yaniv Biton; Dafna Raviv, Center for Educational Technology

State of the Nation: K–12 e-Learning in Canada

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 31
    In Roundtable Session: 69.056-17 – International Studies

Mon, May 1, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 1

Abstract

Current research in K-12 online learning in Canada has focused on defining distance learning and its current strengths and weaknesses. Yet, the proliferation of e-learning has led to the emergence of new instructional strategies and practices for teachers in online and onsite classrooms. For these emerging practices little is known empirically, only anecdotally, as research into these practices has been limited or nonexistent, particularly in Canada. In this session, you will discover that all provinces and territories in Canada have some level of K-12 online learning, while many have some form of regulation related to K-12 online learning. However, few provinces and territories have any regulations related to blended learning; and the level of blended learning activity varies between jurisdictions.

Authors

  • Michael Kristopher Barbour, Touro University – California
  • Randy LaBonte, Canadian E-Learning Network

Examining the International Association for K–12 Online Learning (iNACOL) Standards for K–12 Online Course Design

  • In Event: Poster Session 17
    In Poster Session: 72.050-3 – Online Professional Development, Course Design, and Student Orientation

Mon, May 1, 2:15 to 3:45pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 2

Abstract

Examining the iNACOL Standards for K-12 Online Course Design

Authors

  • David Adelstein, Wayne State University
  • Michael Kristopher Barbour, Touro University – California
  •  AERA, AERA 2017,

April 12, 2016

AEAR 2016 – Narrative Analysis of Students’ and Teachers’ Reflections on Technology-Enhanced Blended Instruction

As I mentioned in the entry entitled AERA 2016 and K-12 Online Learning, the 2016 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is occurring in Washington, DC over the next few days.  That means that I will be blogging many of the sessions throughout the week.  The sixteenth session (and the final one for the conference) that I am blogging is:

Narrative Analysis of Students’ and Teachers’ Reflections on Technology-Enhanced Blended Instruction

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 55
    In Roundtable Session: Teachers’ Perspectives on Technology Integration

12:25 to 1:55pm, Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom B

Abstract

A qualitative narrative inquiry was conducted to examine student cognitive and affective factors that are impacted by implementing a technology-mediated blended learning instructional approach. By analyzing the narratives of six teachers and six students, six major themes emerged from the data: (a) being challenged, (b) effective student collaboration, (c) incorporating multi-disciplinary opportunities, (d) streamlining an effective classroom, (e) streamlining individual success, and (f) utilizing resources. The data indicated that both engagement and achievement can increase when instruction is relevant and authentic, and students are empowered to take responsibility for multiple aspects of their learning.

Authors

  • Frank LaBanca, National Center for Inquiry Learning
  • Sara Doble, Wilton High School

Unfortunately, I have had to leave the conference a day early and I am missing these sessions on the final day.  So if anyone in attendance is able to post notes from the session in the comments below, I’d welcome it.

AERA 2016 – Defining Differentiation in Cyber Schools: What Online Teachers Say

As I mentioned in the entry entitled AERA 2016 and K-12 Online Learning, the 2016 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is occurring in Washington, DC over the next few days.  That means that I will be blogging many of the sessions throughout the week.  The fifteenth session that I am blogging is:

Defining Differentiation in Cyber Schools: What Online Teachers Say

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 55
    In Roundtable Session: Teachers’ Perspectives on Technology Integration

12:25 to 1:55pm, Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom B

Abstract

In an effort to understand how online teachers meet the needs of diverse learners, researchers surveyed teachers in two cyber schools. 118 participants were surveyed focusing on how differentiation is seen in their practice. Grounded theory qualitative analysis of the survey data revealed that online teachers defined differentiation from two distinct perspectives: a) why a student needs differentiation, and b) what a student needs differentiated. Online teachers noted learning styles as the primary reason for differentiation. Online teachers also cited when they differentiate, they adjust content, product, and process. Finally, noticeably absent from the data were references to using assessments in the classroom to inform differentiation. Future research and implications are discussed.

Authors

  • Jennifer Beasley, University of Arkansas
  • Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville

Unfortunately, I have had to leave the conference a day early and I am missing these sessions on the final day.  So if anyone in attendance is able to post notes from the session in the comments below, I’d welcome it.

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