Virtual School Meanderings

January 24, 2021

EBSCO Alerts

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 8:02 am
Tags: , , , , ,

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual schools.

1. TI- School Daze: While educators, politicians and scientists debate the risks and benefits of in-person schooling, students, parents and businesses feel the pain.
AU- MILSHTEIN, AMY
JN- Oregon Business Magazine
PD- Jan2021, Vol. 44 Issue 1, p10-12
PG- 3p
IL- 3 Color Photographs
DT- 20210101
PT- Article
AB- Because of the disruption to students, parents and business, Rice strongly supports schools reopening for in-person instruction. Rice, of Effective Web Solutions, is toying with another idea: converting her unused office space into a school co-op so her employees can get back to work. [Extracted from the article]
AB- Copyright of Oregon Business Magazine is the property of Oregon Business and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
DE- Schools
SU- Scientists
SU- Parents
SU- Educators
SU- Students
IC- 611699 All Other Miscellaneous Schools and Instruction
IC- 611110 Elementary and Secondary Schools
FT- 1496
IS- 02798190
AN- 148036466

Next, I did not receive the alert for cyber schools.

Finally, I also did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

January 17, 2021

EBSCO Alerts

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 8:04 am
Tags: , , , , ,

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual schools.

1. TI- Special Education in Idaho Virtual Schools: An Analysis of the Efficacy of Service Delivery
AU- Sorensen, Terri
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Northwest Nazarene University
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
PG- 236
PT- Dissertation
SU- Special Education; Virtual Schools; Students with Disabilities; Parent Attitudes; Teacher Attitudes; Individualized Education Programs; Parent Role; Equal Education; Federal Legislation; Educational Legislation; Special Education Teachers; Parent Participation
SU- Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
GE- Idaho
AB- Virtual education is expanding exponentially across the country while steeped in controversy. This dissertation analyzes parent and teacher perspectives on how four Idaho virtual schools educate students with disabilities. Two research questions examine parent roles in developing valid IEPs and providing special education services aligned to IDEA regulations. Two additional research questions inquire about strategies used by special education teachers to carry out a valid IEP process and provide appropriate special education services aligned to IDEA regulations. While the literature on virtual or special education is plentiful, information about students with disabilities in virtual schools is less prevalent. Most literature reviewed indicates a need for more research to help all educational stakeholders better understand how virtual schools can effectively serve students with disabilities while meeting IDEA regulations. The researcher chose to perform a qualitative study to capture an understanding of the phenomenon in the natural setting. The data was collected from semi-structured interviews with nine special education teachers and eight parents, researcher observations of eight IEP meetings, and document analysis of eight IEPs. The results of the study reported IEPs and special education services complied with IDEA guidelines although some areas presented challenges. Increased parent involvement was noted throughout the study and appreciated by all research participants. Lack of parental involvement was trying for students with disabilities and teachers in a virtual school, frequently leading to failing grades, truancy, and frustration. The data from this study reported both strengths and challenges faced by students, parents, and teachers working with students with disabilities in a virtual setting. Although this study provided several applications for current practice, areas for additional research are numerous. Moving forward, these students deserve all educational stakeholders working together collaboratively to meet their needs. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-1-392-19140-8
AN- ED608618
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2020

Next, I received the alert for cyber schools. but there were no relevant items.

Finally, the alert for K-12 online learning.

1. TI- Identifying At-Risk K-12 Students in Multimodal Online Environments: A Machine Learning Approach
AU- Li, Hang
AU- Ding, Wenbiao
AU- Liu, Zitao
SO- International Educational Data Mining Society, Paper presented at the International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (13th, Online, Jul
10-13, 2020)
DT- 20200701
YR- 2020
PG- 11
PT- Speeches/Meeting Papers
PT- Report
SU- At Risk Students; Online Courses; Elementary Secondary Education; Learning Modalities; Time; Dropouts; Academic Persistence; Artificial Intelligence; Large Group Instruction; Prediction; Models; Influences; Middle School Students; High School Students; Probability
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Junior High Schools; Middle Schools; Secondary Education; High Schools
AB- With the rapid emergence of K-12 online learning platforms, a new era of education has been opened up. It is crucial to have a dropout warning framework to preemptively identify K-12 students who are at risk of dropping out of the online courses. Prior researchers have focused on predicting dropout in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which often deliver higher education, i.e., graduate level courses at top institutions. However, few studies have focused on developing a machine learning approach for students in K-12 online courses. In this paper, we develop a machine learning framework to conduct accurate at-risk student identification specialized in K-12 multimodal online environments. Our approach considers both online and offline factors around K-12 students and aims at solving the challenges of (1) multiple modalities, i.e., K-12 online environments involve interactions from different modalities such as video, voice, etc.; (2) length variability, i.e., students with different lengths of learning history; (3) time sensitivity, i.e., the dropout likelihood is changing with time; and (4) data imbalance, i.e., only less than 20% of K-12 students will choose to drop out the class. We conduct a wide range of offline and online experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. In our offline experiments, we show that our method improves the dropout prediction performance when compared to state-of-the-art baselines on a real-world educational dataset. In our online experiments, we test our approach on a third-party K-12 online tutoring platform for two months and the results show that more than 70% of dropout students are detected by the system. [For the full proceedings, see ED607784.]
LA- English
FT- Y
AN- ED607899
TY- ED
LV- Available online
EM- 2020
RV- Y

2. TI- The State of Online Learning in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: A COVID-19 Impact Study for K-12
AU- O’Keefe, Lynette
AU- Dellinger, Justin T.
AU- Scragg, Benjamin
AU- Amelina, Natalia
AU- Mathes, Jennifer
AU- Online Learning Consortium (OLC)
SO- Online Learning Consortium
DT- 20200101
YR- 2020
PG- 304
PT- Report
PT- Numerical/Quantitative Data
PT- Tests/Questionnaires
SU- Foreign Countries; Online Courses; Educational Technology; Elementary Secondary Education; COVID-19; Pandemics; School Closing; Leadership; Curriculum Design; Curriculum Development; Student Evaluation; Student Needs; Faculty Development; Teacher Competencies; Administrator Attitudes; Teaching Methods; Teacher Attitudes; Parent Attitudes; Student Attitudes; Governance
GE- Saudi Arabia
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- To ensure that high quality online learning is being offered in the future, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) commissioned a study to understand the state of online K-12 education pre-, peri- and post-COVID based on the academic period from March 9-May 14, 2020. The intention was to determine opportunities for improvement while identifying areas of excellence that could be highlighted against an evaluation framework for quality K-12 online learning. Using this information, K-12 education within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia would be positioned to make improvements to the overall student learning experience. The study focused on eight dimensions, each with several subdimensions, and included survey and interview data, contextualized within the KSA K-12 environment for both development and analysis. Dimensions included Leadership, Curriculum Design and Planning, Online Teaching and Learning, Assessment, Technology, Student Support, Training and Support, and Evaluation and Continuous Improvement. Each of these dimensions and their associated subdimensions are discussed at length in the report, but there were several overarching themes that emerged. The report has been organized into four primary sections as well as several appendices. The introduction provides context for the study, the methodology section provides information regarding the development and analysis of both quantitative survey instrumentation and qualitative protocols, and includes a summary of participants, the recommendations section provides data interpretation and recommendations by dimension and subdimension (aligned with the Future Action Framework), and the considerations for future study section contains recommendations for further research based on this study as well as findings indicating potential future expansion. Finally, the appendices provide the Future Action Framework summary of recommendations, the literature review, survey and interview protocols, and a list of figures. [This study was coordinated with the Council of Ministers of Saudi Arabia’s National eLearning Center.]
LA- English
FT- Y
AN- ED608877
TY- ED
LV- Available online
EM- 2020

3. TI- Advancing a Curriculum toward Improved Online Nurturing of K-12 Students
AU- Barbour, Michael K.
AU- Siko, Jason
SO- Journal of Educational Technology, v16 n4 p20-32 Jan-Mar 2020
VI- 16
IP- 4
DT- 20200101
YR- 2020
SP- 20
EP- 32
PG- 13
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Curriculum Development; Electronic Learning; Online Courses; Instructional Design; Educational Technology; Faculty Development; Web Based Instruction; Teacher Attitudes; Secondary School Teachers; Elementary School Teachers; Web 2.0 Technologies; Age Differences
GE- Michigan
SU- Elementary Education; Secondary Education
AB- Despite the massive growth in K-12 online learning, there are no opportunities for teachers to learn and develop skills to succeed as online instructors. This study is the third iteration of an action research project, which focused on improving a graduate instructional technology course and developing teachers with these skills. Previous results of the first two iterations are summarized, and qualitative data from the third round, consisting of blogs and course assignments were analyzed for emerging themes. These themes emphasize instructional design to solve problems associated with student performance, improve communication channels, and ensures that student age as a non-factor in online course success. Recommendations for future course iterations are presented as well.
LA- English
IS- 0973-0559
AN- EJ1266243
TY- EJ
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2020
RV- Y

January 10, 2021

EBSCO Alerts

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 8:04 am
Tags: , , , , ,

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual schools, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I did not receive the alert for cyber schools.

Finally, I also did not receive an alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week.

January 3, 2021

EBSCO Alerts

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 8:09 am
Tags: , , , , ,

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual schools, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I did not receive the alert for cyber schools.

Finally, I also did not receive an alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week.

December 27, 2020

EBSCO Alerts

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 2:03 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual schools.

1. TI- ON-SCREEN AND ON POINT.
AU- MAUGHAN, SHANNON
JN- Publishers Weekly
PD- 12/14/2020, Vol. 267 Issue 51, p61-62
PG- 2p
IL- 4 Color Photographs
DT- 20201214
PT- Article
AB- The article offers information on various virtual school visits conducted by authors. It mentions that Jonathan Auxier developed a new presentation for “Willa the Wisp” combining a readaloud with different character voices, a peek at the drawings in his personal journal, a brainstorming session to create punny animals with students, and question and answer elements. It also informs that Mac Barnett and Shawn Harris have a natural rapport that translates well to their virtual visits.
DE- Schools
SU- Authors
IC- 711513 Independent writers and authors
IC- 711510 Independent Artists, Writers, and Performers
IC- 611699 All Other Miscellaneous Schools and Instruction
IC- 611110 Elementary and Secondary Schools
PE- Auxier, Jonathan
PE- Barnett, Mac, 1982-
PE- Harris, Shawn
FT- 1106
IS- 00000019
AN- 147589672

Next, I did not receive the alert for cyber schools.

Finally, I also did not receive an alert for K-12 online learning.

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