Virtual School Meanderings

October 13, 2019

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual schools, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I also received the alert for cyber schools, but again there were no relevant items.

Finally, once again I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report again this week.

October 6, 2019

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I did not receive the alert for virtual schools.

Next, I received the alert for cyber schools, but there were no relevant items.

Finally, once again I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week.

September 29, 2019

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual schools.

1. TI- K12 Inc., Ga. Cyber Academy Contract Battle Brews.
AU- Klein, Alyson
JN- Education Week
PD- 8/21/2019, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p10-11
PG- 2p
DT- 20190821
PT- Article
AB- The article reports on the public split of K12 Inc., a major for-profit  provider of online education, with the virtual school Georgia Cyber Academy.  Topics discussed include statement from Mike Kooi, the schools’ executive  director, remarks from Kevin Chavous, the president of K12 Inc., and actions  taken by K12 in retaliation for the school’s curriculum change.
DE- ONLINE education
DE- VIRTUAL schools
DE- VIRTUAL classrooms
CO- K12 Inc. Ticker: LRN
PE- CHAVOUS, Kevin
FT- 1305
IS- 02774232
AN- 138219545

Next, I did not receive the alert for cyber schools.

Finally, once again I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

September 22, 2019

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual schools.

1. TI- Virtual School Garden Exchange — Thinking Globally, Gardening Locally
AU- Lochner, Johanna
SO- Research-publishing.net
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
PG- 8
PT- Report
SU- Gardening; Computer Simulation; Elementary School Students; Secondary School Students; Films; Electronic Mail; Photography; Videoconferencing; Environmental Education; Sustainable Development; Decision Making; Global Approach; Teaching Methods; Exchange Programs; Program Descriptions; International Cooperation; Foreign Countries; Secondary School Teachers
SU- Elementary Education; Secondary Education
AB- This paper gives an overview of nine different Virtual School Garden Exchange (VSGE) projects. In VSGEs, learners from primary or secondary schools with school gardens exchange virtually on their garden experiences and related topics, using digital media like emails, photos, films, or videoconferences. In this manner, the global perspective of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) can be integrated in the school garden. ESD aims to enable children, young people, and adults to think and act in a sustainable manner. It puts people in a position to make decisions for the future and to estimate how their actions affect future generations or life elsewhere in the world. In this paper, the research procedures and main results of the preliminary study of my PhD research project are presented. [For the complete volume, “Telecollaboration and Virtual Exchange across
Disciplines: In Service of Social Inclusion and Global Citizenship,” see ED596376.]
LA- English
FT- Y
AN- ED596482
TY- ED
LV- Available online
EM- 2019
RV- Y

2. TI- The Effects of a Teacher Feedback Intervention in a Virtual School Setting
AU- Barry, Lauren Nicole
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
PG- 107
PT- Dissertation
SU- Intervention; Feedback (Response); Students with Disabilities; Virtual Classrooms; Learner Engagement; Electronic Learning; Instructional Effectiveness; Teacher Attitudes; Teacher Improvement
AB- With a growing number of students with disabilities electing to enroll in virtual education programs, it is imperative for teachers in virtual education programs to employ evidence-based practices to ensure that instructional delivery meets the student’s needs and facilitates academic success. However, there is a limited amount of quantitative research on how educators in a virtual education setting can provide feedback to students with disabilities to promote active student engagement in this isolated environment. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a teacher feedback intervention on the quality of teacher feedback to students provided in a virtual education system and how this factor impacts active engagement time of students with disabilities in the virtual education program. The study utilized a single-subject multiple baseline across participants research design to examine the effects of the teacher feedback intervention on improving the quality of teacher feedback as well as the effects of the quality of teacher feedback on the active engagement time of students with disabilities in the virtual education program. Results indicated that the teacher feedback intervention training had a functional relationship with the quality of feedback provided by teachers in the virtual education program. Although there was an increase in the quality of feedback provided by teachers in the virtual education setting, there was no evidence of a functional relationship between increasing the quality of teacher feedback and increasing the active engagement of students with disabilities in the virtual education setting. All three teacher participants rated their experience with the intervention and training as effective on social validity surveys. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-438-77457-5
AN- ED596010
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019

3. TI- Virtual Schools in the U.S. 2019
AU- Molnar, Alex
AU- Miron, Gary
AU- Elgeberi, Najat
AU- Barbour, Michael K.
AU- Huerta, Luis
AU- Shafer, Sheryl Rankin
AU- Rice, Jennifer King
AU- University of Colorado at Boulder, National Education Policy Center
SO- National Education Policy Center
DT- 20190501
YR- 2019
PG- 125
PT- Report
SP- Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice
SU- Computer Simulation; Efficiency; Distance Education; Academic Achievement; Institutional Characteristics; Public Education; Educational Research; Educational Practices; State Legislation; Educational Policy; Teaching Methods; Blended Learning; Student Characteristics; Elementary Secondary Education; Educational Finance; Governance; Educational Quality; Teacher Effectiveness; Teacher Student Ratio; Enrollment; Educational Improvement; Accountability; Costs; Online Courses; Full Time Students; Charter Schools; School Effectiveness; Proprietary Schools
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- As proponents continue to make the case that virtual education can expand student choices and improve the efficiency of public education, full-time virtual schools have attracted a great deal of attention. Advocates contend that this potential for individualization allows virtual schools to promote greater student achievement than can be realized in traditional brick-and-mortar schools. NEPC researchers found, however, that the research evidence does not support this claim. This three-part brief provides disinterested scholarly analyses of the characteristics and performance of full-time, publicly funded K-12 virtual schools; reviews the relevant available research related to virtual school practices; provides an overview of recent state legislative efforts to craft virtual schools policy; and offers policy recommendations based on the available evidence.
LA- English
FT- Y
AN- ED595244
TY- ED
LV- Available online
EM- 2019
RV- Y

4. TI- Academic Hustle: Teaching African American Students in Online Educational Environments
AU- Townsend, Tora Hope
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Indiana State University
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
PG- 207
PT- Dissertation
SU- African American Students; Elementary Secondary Education; Virtual Classrooms; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Kindergarten; Program Effectiveness; Online Courses; Success; Barriers
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Early Childhood Education; Elementary Education; Kindergarten; Primary Education
AB- The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of K-12 virtual school models on the educational outcomes of African American students. This study sought to (a) contribute to the growing body of research and literature on virtual schooling models, (b) enlighten stakeholders regarding K-12 African American students in a technology-driven paradigm, and (c) elucidate means to improve schooling experiences of African American students that lead to better outcomes. This study examined the impact of the relationship between virtual schools and the academic success of African American students in Kindergarten through Grade 12. Through this qualitative case study, current and former virtual teachers of African American students reported the benefits and challenges of using technology and online curriculum to support
African American students. The data can serve as a research-based guide to determine if a virtual school option would benefit or hinder student academic growth and gains, based on the student demographics they serve. [The
dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copiesof dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-438-76008-0
AN- ED595680
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019

Next, the alert for cyber schools.

1. TI- Parent-Teacher Relationships in Cyber Charter Schools: Investigating the Quality of the Parent-Teacher Relationship and Its Impact on Student Achievement
AU- Henderson, Theresa
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Duquesne University
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
PG- 131
PT- Dissertation
SU- Parent Teacher Cooperation; Virtual Classrooms; Charter Schools; Electronic Learning; Academic Achievement; Elementary Secondary Education; Predictor Variables; Parent Attitudes; Parent Participation
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- K-12 online and blended learning initiatives have experienced unprecedented growth in the past decade and are fast becoming a mainstream option for today’s generation of learners. In 2016, over five million students were enrolled in K-12 full-time state virtual schools and all 50 states and the District of Columbia offered some form of online learning for K-12 students with even greater growth projections by 2020. While K-12 online learning has grown in popularity and demand, research-based investigations into successful teaching, learning and student support developments are limited. There is reason to believe that the quality of the parent-teacher relationship in cyber charter schools could be as important, if not more important than its role in traditional schooling. Currently, contemporary studies on the parent-teacher relationship only address face-to-face student populations. Therefore, the study of the quality of the parent-teacher relationship and its impact in on student achievement in cyber charter schools could assist the development of new strategies in cyber charter schools, teacher preparation programs, accrediting institutions, and policy makers. The purpose of this study is to investigate the quality of the parent-teacher relationship and it impact on student’s achievement in K-12 cyber charter schools. To address this question, this study employed an online survey adapted from Timothy Majerus’ (2011) instrument, which was constructed on research by Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler, sampling parents from a cyber charter school in the Northeastern U.S. Quantitative statistical procedures were utilized to analyze the resulting data. Outcomes indicate that the quality of the parent-teacher relationship do have predictive effect related to student achievement. Parental perception of the parent-teacher relationship, opportunity for parent involvement, parent efficacy, and time for parental involvement were assessed. Implications related to these findings can be used to increase the quality and effectiveness of the parent-teacher relationship in cyber charter schools by developing comprehensive plans for policy makers and accrediting institutions, developing and delivering curricula materials and trainings for pre-service and in-service teachers, and developing and delivering instructional materials for parents that promote an efficacious relationship with teachers that will significantly impact their child’s academic achievement and success in cyber charter schools. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-438-79257-9
AN- ED595598
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019

Finally, the alert for K-12 online learning.

TI- Preparing Education Professionals for K-12 Online Learning Programs
AU- Kennedy, Kathryn
AU- Tysinger, Dawn
AU- Bailey, Carrie
AU- LaFrance, Jason
SO- Educational Media and Technology Yearbook
DT- 20130101
YR- 2013
PG- 8
PT- Report
SU- Electronic Learning; Online Courses; Virtual Classrooms; Blended Learning; Elementary Secondary Education; Counselor Training; Administrator Education; Preservice Teacher Education
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
AB- This chapter discusses the need for preparing all education professionals, including teachers, school psychologists, school counselors, administrators, school media specialists, and education technologists for virtual schools and other K-12 online learning programs. It provides some base information about what preparatory programs can do to help candidates understand the needs of the growing number of K-12 students who are enrolled in online learning programs, whether they are 100 % online, hybrid, or blended. This chapter serves as a call-to-action for preparatory programs to start thinking critically about what they are doing (or not doing) to prepare their candidates for this new learning environment.
LA- English
AN- ED595756
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019
RV- Y

2. TI- Parent-Teacher Relationships in Cyber Charter Schools: Investigating the Quality of the Parent-Teacher Relationship and Its Impact on Student Achievement
AU- Henderson, Theresa
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Duquesne University
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
PG- 131
PT- Dissertation
SU- Parent Teacher Cooperation; Virtual Classrooms; Charter Schools; Electronic Learning; Academic Achievement; Elementary Secondary Education; Predictor Variables; Parent Attitudes; Parent Participation
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- K-12 online and blended learning initiatives have experienced unprecedented growth in the past decade and are fast becoming a mainstream option for today’s generation of learners. In 2016, over five million students were enrolled in K-12 full-time state virtual schools and all 50 states and the District of Columbia offered some form of online learning for K-12 students with even greater growth projections by 2020. While K-12 online learning has grown in popularity and demand, research-based investigations into successful teaching, learning and student support developments are limited. There is reason to believe that the quality of the parent-teacher relationship in cyber charter schools could be as important, if not more important than its role in traditional schooling. Currently, contemporary studies on the parent-teacher relationship only address face-to-face student populations. Therefore, the study of the quality of the parent-teacher relationship and its impact in on student achievement in cyber charter schools could assist the development of new strategies in cyber charter schools, teacher preparation programs, accrediting institutions, and policy makers. The purpose of this study is to investigate the quality of the parent-teacher relationship and it impact on student’s achievement in K-12 cyber charter schools. To address this question, this study employed an online survey adapted from Timothy Majerus’ (2011) instrument, which was constructed on research by Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler, sampling parents from a cyber charter school in the Northeastern U.S. Quantitative statistical procedures were utilized to analyze the resulting data. Outcomes indicate that the quality of the parent-teacher relationship do have predictive effect related to student achievement. Parental perception of the parent-teacher relationship, opportunity for parent involvement, parent efficacy, and time for parental involvement were assessed. Implications related to these findings can be used to increase the quality and effectiveness of the parent-teacher relationship in cyber charter schools by developing comprehensive plans for policy makers and accrediting institutions, developing and delivering curricula materials and trainings for pre-service and in-service teachers, and developing and delivering instructional materials for parents that promote an efficacious relationship with teachers that will significantly impact their child’s academic achievement and success in cyber charter schools. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-438-79257-9
AN- ED595598
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019

3. TI- Innovative Applications of Online Pedagogy and Course Design
AU- Sharma, Ramesh C.
SO- IGI Global
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
PG- 451
PT- Book
PT- Collected Works – General
SU- Educational Innovation; Electronic Learning; Online Courses; Instructional Design; Distance Education; Elementary School Teachers; Teacher Education; Teacher Attitudes; Foreign Countries; Technology Integration; Figurative Language;Self Efficacy; Intelligent Tutoring Systems; Elementary Secondary Education; Politics of Education; Outcomes of Education;
Psychological Patterns; Tutors; Feedback (Response); Teacher Student Relationship; Asynchronous Communication; English Language Learners; Reading Comprehension; Sentence Structure; Social Media; College Faculty; Instructional Effectiveness
GE- Finland; Greece
SU- Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
AB- New tools and technologies are being developed to cater to the e-learning triangle of content, technology, and services. These developments (in technology, needs of students, emergence of new modes of education like MOOCs or flipped classrooms, etc.) have resulted in a change in the approach to teaching. “Innovative Applications of Online Pedagogy and Course Design” is a critical publication that explores e-learning as a tool for instructional delivery across various kinds of educational institutions and at all levels. Featuring coverage on a wide range of topics such as distance education, cumulative sentence analysis, and primary teacher training, this book is geared toward educators, professionals, school administrators, researchers, and practitioners seeking current and relevant research on instructional design and delivery in online and technology-based courses. This book contains the following chapters: (1) Emergent Technologies Shaping
Instructional Design (Pascal Roubides); (2) Values and Purposes in Digital Pedagogies: A Meta-Analysis on Finnish and Greek Teachers’ Metaphorical Thinking (Marianna Vivitsou); (3) Using Web 2.0 Tools to Engage Content, Promote Self-Efficacy, and Implications for Intentional Student Learning (Paul Parkison and Jeff A. Thomas); (4) A Methodology to Design and Evaluate Agents: The Study Language Agent Case (Silvia Tamayo-Moreno and Diana Pérez-Marín); (5) Still Forgotten Teachers in K-12 Online Learning: Examining the Perceptions of Teachers Who Develop K-12 Online Courses (Michael K.
Barbour, David Adelstein, and Jonathan Morrison); (6) The Politics of E-Learning: A Theoretical Model (Mahesh S. Raisinghani, Celia Romm Livermore, and Pierluigi Rippa); (7) Affect in Online Learning: Outcomes, Emotions, and Affective States (Wendy Fasso and Bruce Allen Knight); (8) Tutors’ Perspectives on Online Facilitation of ESL Courses in Distance Education (Li Hsien Ooi, Lay Huah Goh, Arathai Din Eak, and Cheng Teik Ong); (9) Student and Instructors Perceptions of Helpful Feedback for Asynchronous Online Learning: What Students Want From Instructor Feedback (Susan Shedd Conrad and Nada Dabbagh); (10) Fostering EFL Learners’ Reading Comprehension Through a Web-Based Cumulative Sentence Analysis (CSA) System (Yea-Ru Tsai); (11) The Impact of Instructor Twitter Use on Course Performance Indicators: A
Quasi-Experiment Within Higher Education Communications Courses (Eric M. Fife, C. Leigh Nelson, and Theresa B. Clarke); (12) Use of Facebook in Primary Teacher Training: Experimental Analysis (Inmaculada Gómez-Hurtado); (13) Use of Facebook in Primary Teacher Training: Experimental Analysis (Inmaculada Gómez-Hurtado); (14) Virtual Laboratory Work for Discovering Gas Solubility in Water: Effects of Altered Guiding Structures (Göran Karlsson); (15) Case Study of HyFlex Course Design: Benefits and Challenges for Graduate Students (Mariam Mousa Matta Abdelmalak and Julia Lynn Parra); (16) Collaboration-Driven Management Education (Owen P. Hall, Jr. and Kenneth D. Ko); (17) A Phenomenological Interpretation of Students’ Online Technology Experiences With Other Students in Blended Tertiary Environments (Kimberley
Tuapawa); and (18) Creating a Global and Innovative Higher Education Environment: A Case Study (Paula Peres and Anabela Mesquita). A section about the contributors and an index are included.
LA- English
AG- Administrators; Practitioners; Researchers; Teachers
IB- 978-1-5225-5466-0
AN- ED594171
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019
RV- Y

4. TI- Educational Media and Technology Yearbook, Volume 37
AU- Orey, Michael
AU- Jones, Stephanie A.
AU- Branch, Robert Maribe
SO- Educational Media and Technology Yearbook
DT- 20130101
YR- 2013
PG- 398
PT- Book
PT- Collected Works – General
PT- Reference Entry
SU- Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Design; Instructional Design; Aesthetics; Educational Improvement; Performance; Diversity; Sustainability; Global Approach; Elementary Secondary Education; Higher Education; Awards; Social Capital; Internet; Rural Areas; Language Teachers; English (Second Language); Foreign Countries; Library Science; Information Science; Electronic Publishing; Textbooks; Professional Education; Web 2.0 Technologies; School Libraries; Library Services; Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Graduate Study; Professional Associations; Artificial Intelligence; Robotics
GE- Guatemala; United States; Canada
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
AB- As digital devices play a more critical role in daily life than ever, more opportunities arise for innovative learning technologies–a trend on full display in the “Educational Media and Technology Yearbook for 2012.” This latest edition, volume 37, from the Association for Education, Communication, and Technology (AECT) notes the most current trends in the field of learning design and technology, taking into account the implications for both formal and informal learning. The majority of articles train their focus on graduate and professional goals, including an analysis of doctoral programs in educational technology and new collaborative learning platforms. Library science is a featured component of this analysis and Library Science programs are featured prominently in this analysis. Mediagraphy and profiles of leaders in the field are also included. Part I, Trends and Issues in Learning, Design, and Technology, contains the following chapters: (1) Trends and Issues in Learning, Design, and Technology (Daisyane Barreto, Michael Orey); (2) Where is the “Design” in Instructional Design? The Role of Visual Aesthetics in the Field (Lori A. Brown, Linda L. Lohr, James E. Gall, Anna Ursyn); (3) Improving Learning and Performance in Diverse Contexts: The Role and Importance of Theoretical Diversity (Ray K. Haynes, Yonjoo Cho); (4) Trends and Issues: The Consumption and Sustainability of Digital Media in the Modern Global Economy (Gabrielle Garner); (5) Issues and Trends in Instructional Technology: Despite Lean Times, Continued Interest and Opportunity in K-12, Business, and Higher Education (Abbie Brown, Tim Green); (6) Introduction to the Qualitative Inquiry Award (Robert Maribe Branch); and (7) Social Capital Influences upon Internet Usage of Rural Guatemalan English Teachers (Douglas Tedford). Part II, Trends and Issues in Library Information Science, contains the following chapters: (8) Trends and Issues in Library and Information Science (Stephanie A. Jones); (9) From Paper to Pixel: The Promise and Challenges of Digital Textbooks for K-12 Schools (Marcia Mardis, Nancy Everhart); (10) Preparing Education Professionals for K-12 Online Learning Programs (Kathryn Kennedy, Dawn Tysinger, Carrie Bailey, Jason LaFrance); and (11) The Web 2.0 Connection: An Exploratory Study of School Library Services for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Daniella Smith). Part III, Organizations and Associations in North America, provides the following chapters: (12) Organizations and Associations (Michael Orey);
and (13) Educational Media and Technology Yearbook, 2012: Vol. 37. Organizations and Associations in the USA and Canada (Michael Orey). Part IV, Graduate Programs, contains the following: (14) Graduate Programs (Michael Orey); and (15) Organizations and Associations in the USA and Canada (Michael Orey). Part V, Mediagraphy: Print and Non-Print Resources, contains the following chapters: (16) Introduction (Jinn-Wei Tsao); and (17) Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, and Electronic Performance Support Systems (Jinn-Wei Tsao).
LA- English
IB- 978-1-4614-4429-9
IS- 8755-2094
AN- ED595734
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019
RV- Y

September 15, 2019

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I did not receive the alert for virtual schools.

Next, I received the alert for cyber schools, but there were no relevant items.

Finally, once again I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week at all.

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