Virtual School Meanderings

January 19, 2020

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual school.

1. TI- A Case Study of a Foster Parent Working to Support a Child with Multiple Disabilities in a Full-Time Virtual School
AU- Rice, Mary F.
AU- Ortiz, Kelsey R.
AU- Curry, Toni M.
AU- Petropoulos, Ryan
SO- Journal of Online Learning Research, v5 n2 p145-168 2019
VI- 5
IP- 2
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
SP- 145
EP- 168
PG- 24
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Foster Care; Multiple Disabilities; Electronic Learning; Students with Disabilities; Middle School Students; Parent Attitudes; Parent School Relationship; Disabilities; Educational Legislation; Equal Education; Federal Legislation; Educational Quality; Family Characteristics
SU- Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
SU- Junior High Schools; Middle Schools; Secondary Education
AB- With increases in the number of students enrolling in virtual schools, increases in students with disabilities can also be expected at virtual schools. Further, not all of these students enrolling in virtual schools will live with their biological parents. As students with disabilities move online, they continue to be protected under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). However, these students spend much of the day with their parents or caregivers, if they are supervised at all, which raises questions about the depth and breadth of services that students with disabilities are receiving through their virtual schools. The purpose of this case study was to learn how a foster parent of a student with a disability in a fully online virtual middle school program perceived the school’s response to her child’s needs, as well as how she imagined that the school perceived her. This foster mother determined that virtual school educators could not educate her son in accordance with IDEA. The study offers implications for improving students’ and parents’ virtual school experiences.
LA- English
IS- 2374-1473
FT- Y
AN- EJ1229408
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2019
RV- Y

2. TI- Florida Virtual School Impact on the Graduation Rate of a Higher Education Honors Program
AU- Callahan, Michael T.
AU- King, Kathleen P.
SO- Adult Higher Education Alliance, Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Adult Higher Education Alliance (42nd, Orlando, FL, Mar 8-9, 2018)
DT- 20180301
YR- 2018
PG- 6
PT- Speeches/Meeting Papers
PT- Report
SU- High Schools; Virtual Classrooms; Distance Education; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; College Admission; Honors Curriculum; Undergraduate Students; Program Effectiveness; Graduation Rate; High School Graduates; Online Courses; Grade Point Average
GE- Florida
SU- High Schools; Secondary Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
AB- While higher education institutions seek to increase college admissions’ predictions of student success, they have largely overlooked examining possible impacts of online distance education classes completed in high school. Using information from an undergraduate honors program, this study analyzed whether an indicator of undergraduate student success can be influenced by such courses. The results suggest that high-achieving Florida Virtual School students admitted to an honors program do not graduate at a higher rate than students who have not completed online distance education classes. However, the study provides a method that can address the sample limitation and guide future research to determine how postsecondary non-honors student applicants are affected by online distance education courses completed in high school. [For the complete proceedings, see
ED590245.]
LA- English
FT- Y
AN- ED590254
TY- ED
LV- Available online
EM- 2018
RV- Y

3. TI- The Role of the Virtual School in Supporting Improved Educational Outcomes for Children in Care
AU- Sebba, Judy
AU- Berridge, David
SO- Oxford Review of Education, v45 n4 p538-555 2019
VI- 45
IP- 4
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
SP- 538
EP- 555
PG- 18
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Foreign Countries; Foster Care; Principals; Virtual Classrooms; Program Effectiveness; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Child Welfare; At Risk Students; Educational Quality; Student Needs; Administrator
Attitudes; Adolescents; Early Adolescents; Academic Achievement; Government School Relationship; Agency Cooperation; Admission (School); Resilience (Psychology); Student Placement; Educational Finance
GE- United Kingdom (England)
AB- In England, ‘Virtual Schools’ oversee and support the educational progress of children in care. This paper reports on the analysis of 16 interviews with Virtual School headteachers that were part of two mixed methods research projects on the educational progress of children in care. These interviews explored their role; the types of support they offer young people in care; what they see as the key factors about a young person’s individual characteristics and care experiences that influence their educational outcomes; how schools support young people in care; and the influence of the foster carer/residential staff on the educational outcomes of these children. The interviews were analysed using NVivo and emerging themes were identified informed by the literature on the education of children in care. The paper draws out the main findings which explore the status and role of Virtual Schools in England, their functions, strategies, and what they see as their contribution to improving the educational outcomes of children in care.
LA- English
IS- 0305-4985
AN- EJ1223253
TY- EJ
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019
RV- Y

4. TI- Promoting the Achievement in Schools of Children and Young People in Care: Virtual School Case Studies. Promoting the Achievement of Looked after Children, PALAC
AU- Carroll, Catherine
AU- Brackenbury, Gill
AU- Herbert, Elisabeth
AU- Lee, Frances
AU- Roberts, Amelia
AU- Cameron, Claire
AU- Freitag, Sara
AU- Crombie, Kerry
AU- Farley, Claire
AU- Parrott, Suzanne
AU- Pike, Jo
AU- Prodohl, Fiona
AU- Connolley, Kelley
AU- MacCarthy, Barbara
AU- Buchanan, Anne-Marie
AU- Brian, Rachael
AU- Lawford, Sarah
AU- Walkey, Amy
AU- Barnes, Kieran
AU- Lane, Sarah
AU- Bettencourt, Michael
AU- Black, Emma
AU- Bland, Michelle
AU- Borrell, Vicky
AU- Middleton, Serena
AU- de Bossart, Jennie
AU- Stanbridge, Peter
AU- University College London (UCL) (United Kingdom), Institute of Education (IOE)
SO- Institute of Education – London
DT- 20180701
YR- 2018
PG- 40
PT- Report
SU- Foreign Countries; Foster Care; Low Achievement; Student Needs; Academic Achievement; School Districts; Program Effectiveness; Intervention; Reading Achievement; Writing Achievement; Lifelong Learning; Emotional Development; Caregiver Role; Agency Cooperation; Educational Psychology; Social Work; Early Childhood Education; Communication Skills; Language Acquisition; Virtual Classrooms; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Elementary Secondary Education
GE- United Kingdom (England); United Kingdom (Wales)
SU- Early Childhood Education; Elementary Secondary Education
AB- As of March 2017, there were 72,670 children and young people in care in England. The number of looked after children has continued to increase steadily over the last eight years. Sixty per cent of these children are in care because of abuse or neglect and three-quarters are placed in foster care arrangements. Children and young people who are in or have experienced care remain one of the lowest performing groups in terms of educational outcomes. However, research is emerging to show that children and young people in care can have very positive experiences of school if they are supported effectively to reach their full potential academically and socially. The purpose of this report is to share practice in local authorities (LA) from across England and Wales that is contributing to improved outcomes and school experiences for children and young people in care. The case studies were all undertaken as part of the Promoting the Achievement of Looked after Children (PALAC) programme between 2014 and 2017. PALAC is a knowledge exchange programme that aims to support the development of practice in schools and to expand the evidence base to ultimately improve outcomes for children in care. This report presents an account of the programme, including the activities undertaken by the participants and the outcomes of the programme to date for pupils in care and staff in the participating virtual schools (VS) and local authorities.
LA- English
AN- ED598746
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019

5. TI- An Exploratory Case Study of Middle School Student Academic Achievement in a Fully Online Virtual School
AU- Wolfinger, Suzanne
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Drexel University
DT- 20160101
YR- 2016
PG- 242
PT- Dissertation
SU- Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Academic Achievement; Middle School Students; Middle School Teachers; Teacher Attitudes; Student Attitudes; Student Characteristics; Academic Support Services; Social Support Groups; Coaching (Performance); Teacher Role; Parent Participation; Peer Relationship; Extracurricular Activities
GE- Pennsylvania
SU- Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools
AB- Virtual school enrollment continues to increase in the United States although the efficacy of this school model remains highly debated. The majority of research conducted about virtual schooling focuses on high school and adult online learners. Recent literature highlights the need for quality research that provides an understanding of the characteristics of adolescent online learners and the types of support they need to achieve academically in a virtual school. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the academic achievement of successful middle school students in a fully online K-12 cyber school (virtual school) in Pennsylvania, through the perceptions of middle school teachers, students, and their learning coaches. The conceptual framework for this study was supported by research and included the following research streams: learner characteristics, academic support, and academic social support. Eight middle school students and their learning coaches and nine middle school teachers participated in this study. In-person observations and interviews were conducted within each student household. The teachers participated in an online focus group interview. This study’s results revealed that the student participants share learner characteristics in common, teachers continue to play an important role in the virtual school model, and specific aspects of parental involvement were revealed that indicate a learning coach’s approach may promote academic achievement. Certain components and features of the education management system were perceived by the study participants as supportive of academic achievement. Lastly, a connection with peers through extracurricular activities appeared to impact student motivation and academic achievement in virtual school. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-1-339-87074-8
AN- ED589165
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2018

6. TI- Virtual School 9-12: 21st Century Strategies and Instructional Practices for Students with Disabilities
AU- Schultze, Melissa M.
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
DT- 20160101
YR- 2016
PG- 155
PT- Dissertation
SU- Disabilities; High School Students; Distance Education; Educational Technology; Teaching Methods; Online Courses; Virtual Classrooms; Public Schools; Curriculum Development; Compliance (Legal); Educational Legislation; Equal Education; Federal Legislation; Educational Practices; Remedial Instruction; Computer Mediated Communication; Team Teaching; Technological Literacy; Common Core State Standards; Scaffolding (Teaching Technique); Daily Living Skills; Academic Accommodations (Disabilities); Individualized Education Programs; Partnerships in Education; Individualized Instruction; Blended Learning
SU- Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
SU- High Schools; Secondary Education
AB- The purpose of this qualitative study was three-fold. First, the purpose was to identify instructional strategies implemented by a virtual public high school to serve students with disabilities. Second, the purpose of this study was to show how the curriculum for students with disabilities developed in a virtual public school in a southeastern state. Lastly, the purpose was to determine how the virtual school in a southeast state addressed the educational requirements of students with disabilities in a manner consistent with the requirements of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). Utilizing semi-structured interviews, data were collected and transcribed through Transcribe, a transcription Website. The transcribed interviews where coded and analyzed for themes and findings. The following themes were found throughout the data: remediation activities, video and audio components, announcements, communication, co-teaching, technology skills, technology instruction, Common Core, development, instructional strategies, scaffolding, life skills, no difference, accommodations, IEP policy, partnerships, individualization, and blended learning. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-1-339-92820-3
AN- ED589414
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2018

7. TI- Meeting the Potential of a Virtual Education: Lessons from Operators Making Online Schooling Work
AU- Doyle, Daniela
AU- Hernandez-Cruz, Ismael
AU- Public Impact
SO- Public Impact
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
PG- 30
PT- Report
SP- Bluum
SU- Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Virtual Classrooms; Online Courses; Charter Schools; Distance Education; Elementary Secondary Education
GE- Idaho; New Hampshire
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- When the first virtual school began more than 20 years ago, it offered an incredible promise: Suddenly, students could get access to a great education and a diversity of courses regardless of place or time. They could have flexibility to “attend” school around medical appointments, sports practices, or whatever else life threw at them. Outside of schoolhouse walls, students could have a more personalized learning experience, pursuing their interests and speeding up or slowing down as needed. This report draws on the experience of two virtual charter schools that are making online schooling work for their students–Idaho Distance Education Academy and New Hampshire’s Virtual Learning Academy Charter School. Through their examples, this report highlights lessons learned for other online operators and policymakers who are eager to make virtual school success the rule, rather than the exception.
LA- English
FT- Y
AN- ED598612
TY- ED
LV- Available online
EM- 2019

Next, the alert for cyber school.

1. TI- An Exploratory Case Study of Middle School Student Academic Achievement in a Fully Online Virtual School
AU- Wolfinger, Suzanne
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Drexel University
DT- 20160101
YR- 2016
PG- 242
PT- Dissertation
SU- Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Academic Achievement; Middle School Students; Middle School Teachers; Teacher Attitudes; Student Attitudes; Student Characteristics; Academic Support Services; Social Support Groups; Coaching (Performance); Teacher Role; Parent Participation; Peer Relationship; Extracurricular Activities
GE- Pennsylvania
SU- Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools
AB- Virtual school enrollment continues to increase in the United States although the efficacy of this school model remains highly debated. The majority of research conducted about virtual schooling focuses on high school and adult online learners. Recent literature highlights the need for quality research that provides an understanding of the characteristics of adolescent online learners and the types of support they need to achieve academically in a virtual school. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the academic achievement of successful middle school students in a fully online K-12 cyber school (virtual school) in Pennsylvania, through the perceptions of middle school teachers, students, and their learning coaches. The conceptual framework for this study was supported by research and included the following research streams: learner characteristics, academic support, and academic social support. Eight middle school students and their learning coaches and nine middle school teachers participated in this study. In-person observations and interviews were conducted within each student household. The teachers participated in an online focus group interview. This study’s results revealed that the student participants share learner characteristics in common, teachers continue to play an important role in the virtual school model, and specific aspects of parental involvement were revealed that indicate a learning coach’s approach may promote academic achievement. Certain components and features of the education management system were perceived by the study participants as supportive of academic achievement. Lastly, a connection with peers through extracurricular activities appeared to impact student motivation and academic achievement in virtual school. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-1-339-87074-8
AN- ED589165
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2018

2. TI- Cyber Schooling and the Accumulation of School Time
AU- Nespor, Jan
SO- Pedagogy, Culture and Society, v27 n3 p325-341 2019
VI- 27
IP- 3
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
SP- 325
EP- 341
PG- 17
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Virtual Classrooms; Time Factors (Learning); Attendance; Accountability; Computer Assisted Instruction; Scheduling; School Schedules; Flexible Scheduling; Educational Finance; School Funds; Student Certification; Computer Mediated Communication; Asynchronous Communication; Articulation (Education)
AB- Full-time virtual schools problematize what it means to ‘attend’ school. Is it the length of time a child is logged on to the school’s software system (regardless of the amount of work done), or the amount of work submitted (regardless of the log-on time)? How should one figure the amount of work teachers are doing when students work by themselves at home? Using data from documents and from interviews with 22 teachers from 10 full-time virtual schools in the U.S., this article examines schools as economies of institutional time, animated through two circuits of ‘temporal accumulation’: one producing students’ individual academic records, a second tracking the quantity of time schools spend working with students. Cyber schooling reconfigures these circuits and their interlinkages, with implications for school funding, student certification, and teachers’ work.
LA- English
IS- 1468-1366
AN- EJ1224286
TY- EJ
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2019
RV- Y

3. TI- Choice, Cyber Charter Schools, and the Educational Marketplace for Rural School Districts
AU- Mann, Bryan
AU- Kotok, Stephen
AU- Frankenberg
AU- Fuller, Ed
AU- Schafft, Kai
SO- Rural Educator, v37 n3 p17-29 Fall 2016
VI- 37
IP- 3
DT- 20160101
YR- 2016
SP- 17
EP- 29
PG- 13
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- School Choice; Charter Schools; Rural Schools; Enrollment Trends; Distance Education; Geographic Location; Equal Education; School Effectiveness; Budgets; School Districts; Student Mobility; Outcomes of Education; Suburbs; Urban Areas; Race; Special Education; Economically Disadvantaged; Student Records; State Legislation
GE- Pennsylvania
AB- Pennsylvania is a state with significant proportions of students who attend rural schools, as well as students who attend charter schools. This study examines enrollment patterns of students in brick and mortar and cyber charter schools in Pennsylvania and how these enrollment patterns differ across geographic locale. We analyze student-level enrollment data, controlling for demographic characteristics, and find that, in contrast to brick and mortar schools, cyber charter schools attract students from a variety of locales across the urban-rural continuum. However, rural students exhibit the greatest likelihood of attending cyber charter schools. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to educational equity, cyber charter school underperformance, and the fiscal impacts of charter schools on the budgets of small school districts.
LA- English
IS- 0273-446X
FT- Y
AN- EJ1225320
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2019
RV- Y

4. TI- Does Rural Differ? Comparing Parent and Student Reasons for Choosing Cyber Schooling
AU- Beck, Dennis
AU- Maranto, Roberto
AU- Shakeel, M. Danish
SO- Rural Educator, v37 n3 p1-12 Fall 2016
VI- 37
IP- 3
DT- 20160101
YR- 2016
SP- 1
EP- 12
PG- 12
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Comparative Analysis; Parent Attitudes; Student Attitudes; DecisionMaking; Special Education; Distance Education; Educational Benefits; Charter Schools; Factor Analysis; Course Selection (Students); Institutional Evaluation; School Choice; Secondary School Students; Student Characteristics
SU- Secondary Education
AB- Cyber-schooling offers potentially greater benefits for rural than urban students, by providing a broader range of courses, ending long commutes, and offering more developed special education services than typically found in rural public schools. We survey students (n=269, 53.7% response rate) and parents (232, 48.7%) at a cyber-charter school dubbed SunTech, to test whether rural subjects choose cyber schooling for distinct reasons. Factor analyses and OLS regressions indicate that rural parents are more apt to choose SunTech for structural reasons such as its broader range of classes and to avoid long commutes to school. In contrast, students were more likely to rank curricular reasons as driving their decision to choose SunTech. Rural status did not affect how either students or parents graded the school
(A-F).
LA- English
IS- 0273-446X
FT- Y
AN- EJ1225308
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2019
RV- Y

Finally, the alert for K-12 online learning.

1. TI- A Snapshot of Successful K-12 Online Learning: Focused on the 2015-16 Academic Year in Michigan
AU- Kwon, Jemma Bae
AU- DeBruler, Kristen
AU- Kennedy, Kathryn
SO- Journal of Online Learning Research, v5 n2 p199-225 2019
VI- 5
IP- 2
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
SP- 199
EP- 225
PG- 27
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Online Courses; Elementary Secondary Education; Management Systems; Feedback (Response); State Legislation; Educational Policy; Enrollment Trends; Learner Engagement; Time Factors (Learning); Special Needs Students; School Districts; Academic Achievement; Profiles
GE- Michigan
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- The purpose of this study was to provide a snapshot of successful K-12 online learning in one of the frontrunner states in the field–Michigan. The authors explored the state’s legislative and policy infrastructure; the beliefs, perceptions, and values of various stakeholders; and statewide enrollment patterns and effectiveness for the 2015-16 academic year. With that understanding, the study presented a secondary analysis of student information, activity, and performance data in a learning management system (LMS) in an attempt to explore success factors at the micro-level. The study results revealed the following: (a) the engagement pattern representing students’ consistent and persistent attempts to complete course tasks week-by-week was the most powerful success factor; (b) a more nuanced notion of students’ time spent in the LMS; and (c) a student population who presents unique needs to be successful in the online learning. The paper concludes with discussion about all findings in terms of a way of creating a feedback loop for upper-level systems.
LA- English
IS- 2374-1473
FT- Y
AN- EJ1229422
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2019
RV- Y

2. TI- Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning 2016
AU- Gemin, Butch
AU- Pape, Larry
AU- Evergreen Education Group
SO- Evergreen Education Group
DT- 20170101
YR- 2017
PG- 63
PT- Report
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Online Courses; Vendors; School Districts; State Agencies; Educational History; Computer Assisted Instruction; Blended Learning; Virtual Classrooms; Geographic Location; Enrollment; Instructional Program Divisions; Intellectual Disciplines; Web Based Instruction; Public Schools; Distance Education; Consortia
GE- Florida; Montana; Michigan; Indiana; Ohio; North Carolina; Wisconsin; Arizona; Nevada; Texas; New Jersey; Maryland; New York
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- “Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning 2016” marks the thirteenth consecutive year Evergreen has published its annual research of the K-12 education online learning market. Throughout the past thirteen years there has been a constant presence that has become the backbone, supporting the growth and success of online learning–the array of organizations that supply online courses, online teachers, digital content and tools to schools. The number and breadth of types of suppliers has changed and grown as the demand for broader and deeper services has increased. Suppliers range from schools that supply regions or whole states, to stand-alone “intermediate” suppliers that provide online courses and related services to schools, to vendors who develop courses and content and deliver their courses directly to schools or distribute them through intermediates. “Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning 2016” focuses on these suppliers of online learning and reports on levels and types of activity, including online course enrollments, types of enrollments and number of students involved in online learning. [For the twelfth edition, see ED570125.]
LA- English
FT- Y
AN- ED588910
TY- ED
LV- Available online
EM- 2018

3. TI- Interaction, Student Satisfaction, and Teacher Time Investment in Online High School Courses
AU- Turley, Chad
AU- Graham, Charles
SO- Journal of Online Learning Research, v5 n2 p169-198 2019
VI- 5
IP- 2
DT- 20190101
YR- 2019
SP- 169
EP- 198
PG- 30
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
PT- Tests/Questionnaires
SU- Interaction; Student Satisfaction; Time Management; Online Courses; Course Evaluation; Secondary School Curriculum; Teacher Student Relationship; High School Students; Educational Quality; Independent Study; Nonschool Educational Programs
SU- Secondary Education; High Schools
AB- This case study explores differences between two online course models by investigating the results of a student end-of-course evaluation survey and teacher communication logs in two online high school courses. The two course models were designed with different types and levels of interaction, one with high levels of student-content interaction, the second with high levels of student-content and student-teacher interaction. The majority of research on interaction in online learning has been conducted with adult learners at the university level. There is far less literature focusing on K-12 online learning while investigating interaction, student satisfaction, and teacher time investment. This case study addresses this gap by exploring the results of 764 student surveys and investigating the teacher time investments of four teachers. In this study the students’ perception of their learning experience in both models met the online program’s acceptable levels. In some dimensions of the course evaluation, the interactive course had a statistically significant higher rating. The teacher communication logs showed a higher teacher time investment in the more interactive courses, with the highest time investment coming from reaching out to inactive students. Due to the shortage of available literature in K-12 online settings regarding interaction, student satisfaction, and teacher time investment, the author recommends additional research in these areas. By continuing to research and understand better about K-12 online learners, this understanding could influence the development of course interaction standards, assist designers in building better courses, and ultimately lead to higher satisfaction for students.
LA- English
IS- 2374-1473
FT- Y
AN- EJ1229415
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2019
RV- Y

January 12, 2020

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual schools.

1. TI- How schools can break the youth offending cycle.
AU- Martindale, Darren1
JN- TES: Times Educational Supplement
PD- 12/20/2019, Issue 5382, p30-31
PG- 2p
DT- 20191220
PT- Article
AD- 1Virtual school head for looked-after children at City of Wolverhampton Council
IS- 00407887
AN- 141023356

Next, the alert for cyber schools, which did not have any relevant items.

Finally, the alert for K-12 online learning.

1. TI- The Online Classroom : Resources for Effective Middle Level Virtual Education
LA- English
AU- Eisenbach, Brooke
AU- Greathouse, Paula
CY- Charlotte, NC
PB- Information Age Publishing
DT- 20190101
SE- The Handbook of Resources in Middle Level Education
PT- eBook
PT- Book
DE- Internet in education
DE- Middle school education–Computer-assisted instruction
DE- Middle school teachers–Training of
DE- EDUCATION / Distance, Open & Online Education
DE- EDUCATION / Non-Formal Education
DE- EDUCATION / Learning Styles
AB- The world of middle level education is rapidly evolving. Increasingly, online learning platforms are complementing or replacing traditional classroom settings. As students exchange classroom interaction for online collaboration, pencils for keyboards, face-to-face conversations for chat room texts, and traditional lessons for digital modules, it becomes apparent that teachers, schools, and administrators must identify ways to keep pace. We must identify ways to meet the needs of middle level learners within this digital context. In this volume, researchers and teachers share a variety of resources centered on the growing world of virtual education and its implications for the middle level learner, educator, and classroom.
IB- 9781641134590
OC- 1097591360
AN- 1937681

January 5, 2020

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual schools, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I did not receive the alert for cyber schools.

Finally, the alert for K-12 online learning.

1. TI- Dropout typologies: Relating profiles of risk and support to later educational re-engagement.
AU- McDermott, Elana R.  1  elana.mcdermott@tufts.edu
AU- Anderson, Sara  2
AU- Zaff, Jonathan F.  3
JN- Applied Developmental Science
PD- Jul-Sep2018, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p217-232
PG- 16p
IL- 6 Charts
DT- 20180701
PT- Article
AB- A large body of work has examined factors that push and pull youth to drop out. However, a relatively minimal amount of work has examined whether and how these factors cluster in individuals’ lives preceding or concurrent to leaving school. This study used Latent Class Analysis with a national sample (N = 1,942) to examine how push, pull, and protective experiences clustered in the lives of individuals who left high school without graduating. Then, we asked how the resultant classes differentially predicted youth re-engagement in educational endeavors. We identified three classes: youth with the presence of protective factors and absence of push/pull factors (Quiet Dropouts), youth with the presence of protective factors and an abundance of push/pull factors (High Adversity), and youth with the presence of instability in factors related to social relationships and school or housing (Instability). Results indicated each profile differentially predicted youths’ re-engagement in education and achievement of educational outcomes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
AB- Copyright of Applied Developmental Science is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
SU- High school dropouts
SU- Student engagement
SU- Educational outcomes
SU- Latent class analysis (Statistics)
SU- Academic achievement
AD- 1 Tufts University
AD- 2 West Virginia University
AD- 3 America’s Promise Alliance
FT- 12835
IS- 10888691
DI- 10.1080/10888691.2016.1270764
AN- 129754822

December 29, 2019

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual schools, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I also received the alert for cyber schools, and again there were no relevant items.

Finally, once again I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week.

December 22, 2019

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual schools, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I also received the alert for cyber schools, and again there were no relevant items.

Finally, once again I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week.

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