Virtual School Meanderings

December 9, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I did not receive the alert for virtual school.

Next, I received the alert for cyber school, but there were no relevant items.

Finally, I also received the alert for K-12 online learning, but again there were no relevant items.

So, there is nothing to report this week.

December 2, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual school.

1. TI- CIO50 2018 #24: Aidan McCarthy, Catholic Education of Western Australia.
AU- Connolly, Byron
JN- CIO (13284045)
PD- 11/22/2018, p6-6
PG- 1p
DT- 20181122
PT- Article
FT- 835
IS- 13284045
AN- 133134058

Next, I received the alert for cyber school, but there were no relevant items.

Finally, the alert for K-12 online learning.

1. TI- EXACT PATH RECEIVES EXEMPLARY CERTICA REVIEW.
JN- Online Product News
PD- Nov2018, Vol. 37 Issue 11, pN.PAG-N.PAG
PG- 1p
DT- 20181101
PT- Article
AB- The article reports that Exact Path from Edmentum Inc obtained excellent ratings in alignment to International Association for K–12 Online Learning National Standards for Quality Online Courses. The standards are divided into online course content, instructional design, student assessment, curriculum evaluation, and technology.
DE- Standards
SU- Distance education
SU- Curricula (Courses of study)
SU- Education
CO- Edmentum Inc.
IC- 611699 All Other Miscellaneous Schools and Instruction
IC- 923110 Administration of Education Programs
IC- 611710 Educational Support Services
FT- 203
AN- 132656634

November 25, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I did not receive the alert for virtual school.

Next, I received the alert for cyber school, but there were no relevant items.

Finally, I also did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week.

November 18, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual school.

1. TI- Virtual School Leaders’ Experiences and Perspectives of the Benefits of and Barriers to Kindergarten through Grade 12 Virtual Schools in Florida
AU- Weiss, Erika
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
PG- 231
PT- Dissertation
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Access to Computers; Public Schools; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Educational Innovation; Leadership Role; Social Influences; Psychological Patterns; Disadvantaged Youth; Social Bias
GE- Florida
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- This applied dissertation responded to two public problems: digital divides and unequal access to educational opportunities via the growth of virtual schooling in kindergarten through Grade 12 (K-12) in the United States. A qualitative instrumental case study approach was used to explore the relative advantages and disadvantages of public K-12 virtual schools in Florida through the experiences and perspectives of 5 virtual school leaders. This research also evaluated the virtual school leaders’ level of innovativeness in relation to the innovativeness/needs paradox (INP) in Rogers’s theory of diffusion of innovations (DOI). The INP suggests that innovativeness plays a role in social stratification issues between the higher and lower socioeconomic individuals in a system. A demographic survey and interviews were used to gather descriptive details for the case analysis. The Innovativeness Scale collected empirical evidence on virtual school leaders’ level of innovativeness. Results participants were in the early majority category of DOI. Demographics suggested upward social mobility, high educational attainment, and tendencies toward innovativeness. Six themes emerged from the interviews: educational optimism, proinnovation bias, strategies of least resistance, fidelity to old-school norms, virtual schools are a public but private schooling niche, and the counterintuitive gauntlet of innovativeness: the legitimacy of virtual schools and stakeholder divides. Findings suggested innovativeness in relation to the INP does have the potential to fuel underlying divides between advantaged and disadvantaged students in public K-12 virtual schools in Florida. The interviews suggested additional factors may play a role in divides in association with innovativeness, specifically, individualistic and systemic epistemologies and cultural relativism. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-438-07766-9
AN- ED587478
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2018

2. TI- Assessing Quality: Teachers’ Perceptions of State Virtual School Courses
AU- Diliberti, Rhonda K.
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Oakland University
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
PG- 263
PT- Dissertation
SU- Educational Quality; Teacher Effectiveness; Teacher Attitudes; Virtual Classrooms; Online Courses; Comparative Analysis; Conventional Instruction; Instructional Effectiveness; Elementary Secondary Education
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- As enrollment in K-12 online courses continues to grow, there is a need to ensure students are enrolled in quality online courses and that online courses provide an educational experience comparable to their face-to-face equivalents. Thus, this study investigated teachers’ views of the quality of online courses at state virtual schools. In designing this study, I developed a conceptual model of quality indicators gathered from the K-12 Quality Matters Rubrics, the Community of Inquiry framework, and the research literature. Using a complementarity mixed-methods approach, I invited state virtual school teachers, who also had experience teaching face-to-face courses, to respond to an electronic survey questionnaire consisting of eleven demographic questions, 43 quality indicator questions, ten online and face-to-face comparisons questions, and two open-ended questions. I used findings from five research questions to inform the quality of online courses at state virtual schools. Results of the study suggested about teachers felt one in six state virtual school courses are well-designed and need little improvement. Findings also indicated participants felt most (39 out of 43) quality indicators were present to at least a reasonable degree in most state virtual school courses. Quality indicators less likely to be present included proctored tests and exams, student-student interaction, direct instruction, and items related to continuous improvement. When viewed with respect to curriculum alignment, findings suggested the assignments/activities and assessments in some courses may not be effectively aligned to the learning objectives. While most teachers felt that student outcomes were equally likely to occur in both online and face-to-face courses, approximately 25% of state virtual school teachers believed students learn more in face-to-face situations. Results also indicated state virtual school teachers perceived online assessments and teachers’ responsibilities to be most related to student outcomes in state virtual school courses. State virtual school teachers also offered recommendations to improve the quality of state virtual school courses. Indicators with the greatest number of recommendations related to course assignments/activities, continuous improvement, course interaction, and assessments. Unanticipated findings suggested learner characteristics and mentors may play an even greater role than expected in student success in state virtual school courses. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-438-26724-4
AN- ED587940
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2018

Next, I received the alert for cyber school.

Finally, I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

November 10, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

This is being posted today to avoid Remembrance Day.

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual school, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I did not receive the alert for cyber school.

Finally, I also did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning.

So nothing to report this week, as I didn’t receive anything.

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