Virtual School Meanderings

May 20, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual school, but there were no relevant items.

Next, the alert for cyber school.

1. TI- Gartner opens cyber school specializing in IT.
JN- PC Week
PD- 2/10/97, Vol. 14 Issue 6, p119
PG- 1/8p
DT- 19970210
PT- Article
AB- Mentions the creation of the Gartner Group Internet Learning Center by  the Gartner Group Inc. for information technology (IT) professionals and end  users.  Examples of topics to be covered; Requisite equipment to utilize the  school; Contact point.
DE- INFORMATION technology education
CO- GARTNER Inc. DUNS Number: 097220180
IC- 611420 Computer Training
IS- 07401604
AN- 9702262169

Finally, I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning this week.

May 13, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual school.

1. TI- Virtual School Startups: Founder Processes in American K-12 Public Virtual Schools
AU- Taylor, Brett D.
AU- McNair, Delores E.
SO- International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, v19 n1 p312-326 Feb 2018
VI- 19
IP- 1
DT- 20180201
YR- 2018
SP- 312
EP- 326
PG- 15
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Public Schools; Virtual Classrooms; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; School Districts; Traditional Schools; Case Studies; Documentation; Content Analysis; Interviews; Observation; Educational Administration
GE- California
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- Traditional school districts do not have a lot of experience with virtual schools and have lost students to state and charter virtual schools. To retain students and offer alternative learning opportunities, more public districts are starting their own virtual schools. This study was an examination of foundational processes at three California virtual schools in traditional school districts. An analysis of the findings revealed that sites perceived the establishing founder, preliminary research, district support, teacher and staff selection, financial evaluation, and curriculum decisions as keys to the founding process. The analysis also led to surprising conclusions, including the need for virtual schools to constantly change and adapt and the focus in this study of organizations over technology. The findings have implications for traditional districts starting virtual schools. The study also indicates that changes in policy could reduce the need for organizational adaptation among virtual schools in traditional school districts.
LA- English
IS- 1492-3831
FT- Y
AN- EJ1174075
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2018
RV- Y

2. TI- How to give looked-after children the right support.
AU- Martindale, Darren
JN- TES: Times Educational Supplement
PD- 3/23/2018, Issue 5292, p48-49
PG- 2p
DT- 20180323
PT- Article
AB- The article offers suggestions for supporting looked-after chldren (LAC). Topics include the impact of awards on the psychology of LAC, the problems associated with the prioritization of LAC, and the relationship between LAC and virtual school heads (VSH). The information on the contribution of LAC in the development of their Personal Education Plan is also presented.
DE- CHILD psychology
DE- CHILD care services
DE- EDUCATIONAL leadership
DE- ACHIEVEMENT gap
DE- VIRTUAL schools
IC- 624410 Child Day Care Services
IS- 00407887
AN- 129182704

Next, I also received the alert for cyber school and there were no relevant items.

Finally, I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning this week.

May 6, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I received the alert for virtual school, but there were no relevant items.

Next, I also received the alert for cyber school and there were no relevant items.

Finally, I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning this week.

So not much to report this week.

April 29, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, I did not receive the alert for virtual school.

Next, I did receive the alert for cyber school, but there were no relevant items.

Finally, I also did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning this week.

So not much to report this week.

April 22, 2018

EBSCO Alerts

ebscoFirst, the alert for virtual school.

1. TI- Self-Reflection and Math Performance in an Online Learning Environment
AU- Choi, Jinnie
AU- Walters, Alyssa
AU- Hoge, Pat
SO- Online Learning, v21 n4 p79-102 Dec 2017
VI- 21
IP- 4
DT- 20171201
YR- 2017
SP- 79
EP- 102
PG- 24
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SU- Online Courses; Reflection; Virtual Classrooms; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Correlation; Mathematics Achievement; Elementary School Students; Middle School Students; High School Students; Self Evaluation (Individuals); Knowledge Level; Concept Formation; Student Attitudes; Age Differences; Mathematics Tests; Difficulty Level; Self Esteem; Grades (Scholastic); Algebra; Mathematics Skills; Probability
SU- Elementary Education
AB- According to recent reports, K-12 full-time virtual school students have shown lower performance in math than their counterparts in brick-and-mortar schools. However, research is lacking in what kind of programmatic interventions virtual schools might be particularly well-suited to provide to improve math performance. Engaging students in self-reflection is a potentially promising pedagogical approach for supporting math learning. Nonetheless, it is unclear how models for math learning in brick and mortar classrooms translate in an online learning environment. The purpose of this study was to (a) analyze assessment data from virtual schools to explore the association between self-reflection and math performance, (b) compare the patterns found in student self-reflection across elementary, middle, and high school levels, and (c) examine whether providing opportunities for self-reflection had positive impact on math performance in an online learning environment. In this study, the self-reflection assessments were developed and administered multiple times within several math courses during the 2014-15 school year. These assessments included 4- 7 questions that asked students to reflect on their understanding of the knowledge and skills they learned in the preceding lessons and units. Using these assessments, multiple constructs and indicators were measured, which included confidence about the topic knowledge/understanding, general feelings towards math, accuracy of self-judgment against actual test performance, and frequency of self-reflection. Through a series of three retrospective studies, data were collected from full-time virtual school students who took three math courses (one elementary, one middle, and one high school math course) in eight virtual schools in the United States during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 school years. The results showed that (a) participation in self-reflection varied by grade, unit test performance level, and course/topic difficulty; (b) more frequent participation in self-reflection and higher self-confidence level were associated with higher final course performance; and (c) self-reflection, as was implemented here, showed limited impact for more difficult topics, higher grade courses, and higher performing students. Implications for future research are provided.
LA- English
IS- 2472-5749
FT- Y
AN- EJ1163452
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2017
RV- Y

2. TI- The Impact of a Virtual Public Charter School Program on the Learning Outcomes of Students with Disabilities: A Quantitative Study
AU- Epps, Sucari
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, California Lutheran University
DT- 20170101
YR- 2017
PG- 165
PT- Dissertation
SU- Public Schools; Charter Schools; Outcomes of Education; Disabilities; Statistical Analysis; Comparative Analysis; English Instruction; Language Arts; Elementary Secondary Education
GE- California
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- This quantitative study investigated the learning outcomes of students with disabilities in comparison to their non-disabled peers in a TK-12th grade school that offers a sixth-twelfth grade virtual public charter school program that currently serves students in the state of California. No differences were found between groups indicating disability status does not pre-determine achievement or performance in a full scale virtual school program. However, the amount of time spent actively engaged in completing coursework is significantly associated with achievement in the English Language Arts (ELA) courses. Furthermore, students in lower grade levels appear to spend more time in their ELA courses than students in the upper grades. Continued research is needed to determine how grades across student groups can be increased and which best practices (i.e., universal design for learning or UDL) can further support student learning virtually. Future research recommendations are provided. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-355-22581-5
AN- ED579051
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2018

3. TI- Edmentum, Inc.
JN- Edmentum, Inc. MarketLine Company Profile
PD- 1/29/2016, p1-12
PG- 13p
DT- 20171101
PT- Company Report
AB- Edmentum is engaged in providing online learning solutions. The company’s products include Study Island, Plato Courseware, EducationCity, EdOptions Academy, Edmentum Reading Suite, Edmentum Assessments and Edmentum Adult + Higher Ed. Edmentum primarily operates in the US, where it is headquartered in Bloomington, Minnesota. As a privately-held entity, Edmentum is not obliged to publish its financial results. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
AB- Copyright of Edmentum, Inc. MarketLine Company Profile is the property of MarketLine, a Progressive Digital Media business and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
SU- Distance education
GE- United States
CO- Plato Learning Inc. DUNS Number: 613196567
IC- 923110 Administration of Education Programs
IC- 611699 All Other Miscellaneous Schools and Instruction
AN- 113391825

Next, the alert for cyber school.

1. TI- Too Many Words, Too Little Support: Vocabulary Instruction in Online Earth Science Courses
AU- Rice, Mary F.
AU- Deshler, Donald D.
SO- International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies, v13 n2 Article 4 p46-61 2018
VI- 13
IP- 2
DT- 20180101
YR- 2018
SP- 46
EP- 61
PG- 16
PT- Academic Journal
PT- Report
SP- Department of Education (ED)
SU- Vocabulary Development; Online Courses; Earth Science; Disabilities; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Content Analysis; Science Instruction; Secondary School Students; Reading Difficulties; Content Area Reading; Coding; Course Content
SU- Secondary Education
AB- As online coursework become more popular, students with disabilities that need vocabulary support for reading comprehension will be among the increase in cyber school students. Researchers have some evidence that certain types of vocabulary support strategies are more efficacious for students with disabilities. The purpose of this article is determining if what was known about strategies for supporting vocabulary was being applied to online learning coursework. A content analysis of types of vocabulary and types of support strategies was performed on science courses from three online course vendors. The results of this study indicate a need for online course vendors to pay more explicit attention to the types of words supported and the strategies they use to do so and for those who support online learners (teachers, parents) to be more proactive about vocabulary support deficiencies that are likely to be present in the courses.
LA- English
CN- H327U110011
IS- 1548-1093
FT- Y
AN- EJ1170724
TY- EJ
LV- Available online
EM- 2018
RV- Y

2. TI- The K-12 Online Teaching Dynamic: A Study of Educators at Multiple Cyber Charter Schools in Pennsylvania
AU- Van Vooren, Scott E.
SO- ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Drexel University
DT- 20170101
YR- 2017
PG- 156
PT- Dissertation
SU- Elementary Secondary Education; Online Courses; Educational Technology; Technology Uses in Education; Structured Interviews; Case Studies; Charter Schools; Teacher Characteristics; Teacher Competencies; Teaching Skills; Technological Literacy
GE- Pennsylvania
SU- Elementary Secondary Education
AB- This study harvested and synthesized information on K-12 online educators within the State of Pennsylvania through structured interviews and artifact evaluations. As parents, students, and the greater K-12 educational community look for innovative ways to increase rigor and student achievement in the 21st century, educational technology is viewed as the conduit to that end. Using a multi-site case study approach, comprehensive research brought to the surface a profile of effective K-12 online educators teaching at various Pennsylvania cyber charter schools. This study sought to answer the following questions: What are the characteristics and competencies of effective K-12 online educators in Pennsylvania cyber charter schools? What evidence displays skills that are specific to effective K-12 online educators in Pennsylvania? These educators rely on their skills acquired during traditional pre-service training to teach in an online environment. Study participants stated they require skills that go above and beyond traditional knowledge, skills collectively known as digital pedagogy. In the 21st century, digital pedagogy skills are moving to the forefront of teacher usage and knowledge base. This is evidenced from the study participants’ statements and the adoption of online teacher certification and credentialing by state departments of education. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
LA- English
IB- 978-0-355-07361-4
AN- ED577476
TY- ED
LV- Not available from ERIC
EM- 2017

 

Finally, I did not receive the alert for K-12 online learning this week.

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