Virtual School Meanderings

July 8, 2020

Congratulations Michael, You Have A New Achievement

An item from one of my open scholarship networks.

ResearchGate
You have a new achievement
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The achievement was:

Congrats, Michael!
Your research items reached 30,000 reads

July 7, 2020

Congratulations Michael, You Achieved Top Stats Last Week

An item from one of my open scholarship networks.

ResearchGate
You have a new achievement
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The achievement was:

Way to go, Michael!
With 473 new reads, your contributions were the most read contributions from your institution

July 3, 2020

Mary F. Rice – New Articles

Note the second article listed in this open scholarship update.

[PDF] ‘I did not feel any passion for my teaching’: a narrative inquiry of beginning teacher attrition in China

G Zhu, M Rice, H Rivera, J Mena, A Van Der Want – Cambridge Journal of Education, 2020
This study conceptualises teacher attrition as a dynamic process of identity
construction and interpretation in shifting professional knowledge landscapes, which
attunes to both individual and contextual milieus. From this perspective, this narrative …
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Self-regulated learning in online learning environments: strategies for remote learning

RA Carter Jr, M Rice, S Yang, HA Jackson – Information and Learning Sciences, 2020
Purpose Many teachers and students in the USA and various parts of the world are
migrating some aspects of education online out of necessity. The purpose of this
paper is to identify and describe strategies of the self-regulated learning (SRL) …
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Michael, People Are Reading Your Work

An item from one of my open scholarship networks.

ResearchGate
Michael K. Barbour
Your weekly stats report is here
View report
ResearchGate GmbH, Chausseestr. 20, 10115 Berlin, Germany. Imprint.
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The actual report read:

Report for week ending
June 27, 2020
Summary
  • +6.5
    Research Interest
    View more
  • +6
    Citations
    View more
  • 0
    Recommendations
    View more
  • +374
    Reads
    View more
People who read your work
Your most read publications
Show only publications
Show all
+58
Reads
22 Full-text reads
Current total: 1,848
+46
Reads
19 Full-text reads
Current total: 5,411
+25
Reads
10 Full-text reads
Current total: 1,636
+18
Reads
5 Full-text reads
Current total: 512
Your citations
Article
+1
Citation
Reads by institution
  • Malaysia
  • Kuala Terengganu
+8
Reads
  • United States
  • College Park
+6
Reads
+6
Reads
Reads by country
United States
+97
Reads
India
+15
Reads
Philippines
+13
Reads
Your publication achievements
View all achievements
Your technical report reached 500 reads
E-Learning-Class-Size
Your article reached 50 reads
Collaboration and Virtual Learning in New Zealand Rural Primary Schools: A Review of the Literature
Your technical report reached 50 reads
State of the Nation: K-12 E-Learning in Canada

July 2, 2020

Michael, You Have A New Citation

Another item from one of my open scholarship networks.

ResearchGate
Michael, we found more citations of your work last week
ResearchGate GmbH, Invalidenstr. 115, 10115 Berlin, GermanyImprint.
See our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

The new citation was from:

  • June 2020
  • Distance Education 41(3)

Abstract

EDITORIAL FOR SPECIAL ISSUE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION. Web-based learning technologies have greatly expanded open, flexible, and distance educational environments. Alongside this growth, efforts need to be made to meet the needs of diverse learners and increase our capacity for diversity, in all of its forms. While it might be tempting to think that online environments are inherently more accommodating to diversity, Barbour and Reeves (2009) argued that the factors that make a student successful using learning technologies are often connected to socioeconomic privilege. Moreover, the recent COVID-19 pandemic has taught us that smooth transitions to online and distance learning are for those with resources, while most students have experienced considerable stress and anguish just finding a place where they could log on to the Internet or even a convenient way to communicate with their instructors. Most of what schools were doing could not even be called online or distance learning, with such terms as emergency or the milder remote learning applied instead (Hodges et. al., 2020). In proposing this issue, we intended to open a space for research and theory that considered, or even challenged, notions of diversity in a critical frame. The issue was to be a venue for scholars, researchers, instructional designers, and classroom teachers to engage with critical theories and diversity in open, flexible, and technology-mediated distance learning environments. We wanted to broaden the conversation about online and distance learning research, practice, and even policy about how to make learning with technologies accessible, relevant, and supportive of multiple intersectional identities. We realized that opening such a space would require us to find authors who were not merely studying diverse individuals, but who were engaging with the nuance and complexities of challenges faced by different groups. We invited submissions that considered a wide variety of technologies, pedagogies, modes, and settings (e.g., K-12, higher education, and industry or corporate settings). In addition, we encouraged submissions that represented a range across multiple intersecting theoretical landscapes. This included, but was not limited to, critical race theory, critical pedagogies, disability studies, feminisms, heutagogy, and LGBTQIA+ studies. Five articles were rigorously peer-reviewed and selected for inclusion in this issue. Ideas that cut across these theories consist of democratization, encounters, and openness.
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