Virtual School Meanderings

August 1, 2022

JOLR Article Notice – Understanding High School Teachers’ Perceived Discouragements to use Social Media Communication Technologies as a Pedagogical Tool to Improve Future Technology Integration Initiatives

The sixth and final article in this issue.

Remember that JOLR is an open access journal, so follow the link below to access this article.

Understanding High School Teachers’ Perceived Discouragements to use Social Media Communication Technologies as a Pedagogical Tool to Improve Future Technology Integration Initiatives

Brett Tozer, Franklin University, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 8Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Initiatives to integrate technology into teaching and learning often lack a long-term follow up to gauge if those same initiatives set the stage for teachers to easily adopt the next stage of learning technologies. Using the ten-year anniversary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Classroom for the Future grant, where $200 million were allocated for a statewide technology initiative to promote 21st century teaching and learning, this study’s aim was to understand what type of barriers in-service teachers perceive regarding the use of social media communication technologies as a legitimate pedagogical tool. Participants were selected using a multi-stage cluster sampling method to ensure rural, town, suburban, and urban teachers were represented. Using the action areas suggested by Ashton et al. (1999) and Bonk et al. (2001), pedagogical, social, managerial, and technical; a typological analysis was done using the responses of 140 Pennsylvania secondary teachers’ stated discouragements. During the analysis a fifth typology, internal school systems, emerged from the data. The most prominent categories were technological and managerial followed by managerial, social, internal school systems, and pedagogical. Ultimately, teachers feel that social media communication technologies are not viewed as legitimate teaching tools. To help teachers feel social media communication technologies are legitimate teaching tools policymakers and school leaders are encouraged to create an atmosphere that promotes administrative support, schedules that incorporate planning, and funds to provide ongoing training for teachers to stay current with technologies

Citation

Tozer, B. (2022). Understanding High School Teachers’ Perceived Discouragements to use Social Media Communication Technologies as a Pedagogical Tool to Improve Future Technology Integration Initiatives. Journal of Online Learning Research, 8(2), 259-281. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 27, 2022 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/220143/.

JOLR Article Notice – Lessons from COVID-19: Four Reasons School Communities Should Embrace K-12 Online Learning

The fifth article in this issue.

Remember that JOLR is an open access journal, so follow the link below to access this article.

Lessons from COVID-19: Four Reasons School Communities Should Embrace K-12 Online Learning

Dillon Simmons, Kansas State, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 8Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

The COVID pandemic afforded educators an opportunity to learn how traditional K-12 learning communities can deliver instruction online. This collective case study utilized semi-structured interviews of seven students, six parents, five teachers, and four administrators, as well as school-wide surveys, to explore realities of remote online learning in one suburban high school learning community during the COVID-19 pandemic. Theoretically, the study relied on the Community of Inquiry (COI) Theoretical Framework and the CIPP Evaluation Model for data collection and analysis. Data collection began with their initial experiences with emergency remote teaching (ERT) in the 4th quarter of the 2019-2020 school year, until the end of the first semester of the 2020-2021 school year. The survey and interviews sought to understand their perspectives of learning online during their experiences with ERT. Though important issues still need to be addressed in K-12 online environments, this research found the learning community perceived that 1) many students were able to learn in online environments, 2) their experiences suggest numerous strategies that can help improve K-12 online learning opportunities, 3) it was still possible to support students and parents with diverse needs in online environments, and 4) the majority of the learning community was interested in more online opportunities even when school might return to normal.

Citation

Simmons, D. (2022). Lessons from COVID-19: Four Reasons School Communities Should Embrace K-12 Online Learning. Journal of Online Learning Research, 8(2), 235-258. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 27, 2022 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/219534/.

JOLR Article Notice – Factors Affecting Online Learning During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Lived Experiences of Parents, Teachers, and Administrators in U.S. High-Needs K-12 Schools

The fourth article in this issue.

Remember that JOLR is an open access journal, so follow the link below to access this article.

Factors Affecting Online Learning During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Lived Experiences of Parents, Teachers, and Administrators in U.S. High-Needs K-12 Schools

Heejung An, Geraldine Mongillo, William Paterson University of New Jersey, United States ; Woonhee Sung, The University of Texas at Tyler, United States ; David Fuentes, William Paterson University of New Jersey, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 8Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Employing phenomenology as a methodological framework, this study sought to capture and understand, from a first-person point of view, what teachers, administrators, and parents in high-needs U.S. K-12 schools experienced related to online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Individual interviews were conducted on the Zoom video conferencing platform to collect in-depth information about participants’ lived experiences related to online learning necessitated by the pandemic. Findings from the thematic data analysis highlight four factors that may need to be taken into consideration when planning, designing, and implementing sustainable online learning in other high-needs schools: (a) accessibility: physical and digital; (b) usability: functional use and instructional technology; (c) wellness: physical and mental, social and emotional; and (d) support: home and school. These findings contribute to the knowledge base about K-12 online learning by sharing lived experiences and add to the literature on online education in high-needs schools in general.

Citation

An, H., Mongillo, G., Sung, W. & Fuentes, D. (2022). Factors Affecting Online Learning During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Lived Experiences of Parents, Teachers, and Administrators in U.S. High-Needs K-12 Schools. Journal of Online Learning Research, 8(2), 203-234. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 27, 2022 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/220404/.

JOLR Article Notice – Striving to Use Culturally Responsive Pedagogy Online: Perceptions of Novice Teachers in High-needs Schools During COVID-19

The third article in this issue.

Remember that JOLR is an open access journal, so follow the link below to access this article.

Striving to Use Culturally Responsive Pedagogy Online: Perceptions of Novice Teachers in High-needs Schools During COVID-19

Ruchi Bhatnagar, Joyce Many, Georgia State University, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 8Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Transition to online teaching during COVID-19 created an immense need to understand the impact on instructional practice of teachers, specifically related to addressing needs of students most underserved in the P-12 system. This study examined perceptions of 39 teachers prepared by our institution who were in their first or second years of teaching, employed in 7 high-needs districts. We interviewed teachers about their use of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (CRP) in online teaching and the factors that helped or inhibited use of CRP online. Teachers who succeeded in use of CRP, demonstrated an ethic of caring, effective online communication, and instructional and curricular modifications to make education meaningful and enlightening for students (Lawrence, 2017; 2020). These findings highlight the debilitating impact of the digital divide and inequitable resources across school districts, in addition to implications for teacher education programs as well as school districts to provide professional development and support structures for novice teachers in online technologies, online resources that are culturally responsive, and involving school personnel for parent and community engagement.

Citation

Bhatnagar, R. & Many, J. (2022). Striving to Use Culturally Responsive Pedagogy Online: Perceptions of Novice Teachers in High-needs Schools During COVID-19. Journal of Online Learning Research, 8(2), 181-202. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 27, 2022 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/219880/.

JOLR Article Notice – Enrollment Timing in Supplementary Online Courses: Do Students who Enroll On-time Have Better Course Outcomes?

The second article in this issue.

Remember that JOLR is an open access journal, so follow the link below to access this article.

Enrollment Timing in Supplementary Online Courses: Do Students who Enroll On-time Have Better Course Outcomes?

Jacqueline Zweig, Erin Stafford, Makoto Hanita, Education Development Center, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 8Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, high school students across the United States were enrolling in online courses at increasing rates. As a result of pandemic related school closures, even more schools enrolled students in supplementary online courses as a method for delivering instruction during emergency remote learning. Despite enrollment increases in online courses for high school students, many questions remain about how to provide effective instruction virtually and the structures and supports that facilitate student success in their online courses. While previous studies have examined predictors of student success in online courses, there is less research on the influence of the enrollment process (e.g., which students enroll, who enrolls them, and when they are enrolled) on student outcomes. To fill this gap, this correlational study examines when students enroll in supplemental online high school courses and whether the timing of enrollment in an online course (i.e., prior to a semester, at the start of a semester, or during a semester already in progress) relates to students’ subsequent course outcomes. The findings suggest that students who enroll on-time are more likely to complete their online courses than students who enroll late.

Citation

Zweig, J., Stafford, E. & Hanita, M. (2022). Enrollment Timing in Supplementary Online Courses: Do Students who Enroll On-time Have Better Course Outcomes?. Journal of Online Learning Research, 8(2), 163-180. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 27, 2022 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/220665/.

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