Virtual School Meanderings

September 26, 2019

Article Notice – A Snapshot Of Successful K-12 Online Learning: Focused On The 2015-16 Academic Year In Michigan

As was mentioned in the entry on Journal of Online Learning Research – September 2019: Volume 5, Number 2, this is the fifth and final article in this new issue.

A Snapshot of Successful K-12 Online Learning: Focused on the 2015-16 Academic Year in Michigan

Jemma Bae Kwon, Kristen DeBruler, Michigan Virtual, United States ; Kathryn Kennedy, Kathryn Kennedy Consulting, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 5Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to provide a snapshot of successful K-12 online learning in one of the frontrunner states in the field—Michigan. The authors explored the state’s legislative and policy infrastructure; the beliefs, perceptions, and values of various stakeholders; and statewide enrollment patterns and effectiveness for the 2015-16 academic year. With that understanding, the study presented a secondary analysis of student information, activity, and performance data in a learning management system (LMS) in an attempt to explore success factors at the micro-level. The study results revealed the following: (a) the engagement pattern representing students’ consistent and persistent attempts to complete course tasks week-by-week was the most powerful success factor; (b) a more nuanced notion of students’ time spent in the LMS; and (c) a student population who presents unique needs to be successful in the online learning. The paper concludes with discussion about all findings in terms of a way of creating a feedback loop for upper-level systems.

Citation

Bae Kwon, J., DeBruler, K. & Kennedy, K. (2019). A Snapshot of Successful K-12 Online Learning: Focused on the 2015-16 Academic Year in Michigan. Journal of Online Learning Research, 5(2), 199-225. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 25, 2019 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/196643/.

Article Notice – Interaction, Student Satisfaction, And Teacher Time Investment In Online High School Courses

As was mentioned in the entry on Journal of Online Learning Research – September 2019: Volume 5, Number 2, this is the fourth article in this new issue.

Interaction, Student Satisfaction, and Teacher Time Investment in Online High School Courses

Chad Turley, Charles Graham, Brigham Young University, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 5Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This case study explores differences between two online course models by investigating the results of a student end-of-course evaluation survey and teacher communication logs in two online high school courses. The two course models were designed with different types and levels of interaction, one with high levels of student-content interaction, the second with high levels of student-content and student-teacher interaction. The majority of research on interaction in online learning has been conducted with adult learners at the university level. There is far less literature focusing on K-12 online learning while investigating interaction, student satisfaction, and teacher time investment. This case study addresses this gap by exploring the results of 764 student surveys and investigating the teacher time investments of four teachers. In this study the students’ perception of their learning experience in both models met the online program’s acceptable levels. In some dimensions of the course evaluation, the interactive course had a statistically significant higher rating. The teacher communication logs showed a higher teacher time investment in the more interactive courses, with the highest time investment coming from reaching out to inactive students. Due to the shortage of available literature in K-12 online settings regarding interaction, student satisfaction, and teacher time investment, the author recommends additional research in these areas. By continuing to research and understand better about K-12 online learners, this understanding could influence the development of course interaction standards, assist designers in building better courses, and ultimately lead to higher satisfaction for students.

Citation

Turley, C. & Graham, C. (2019). Interaction, Student Satisfaction, and Teacher Time Investment in Online High School Courses. Journal of Online Learning Research, 5(2), 169-198. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 24, 2019 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/209812/.

Article Notice – A Case Study Of A Foster Parent Working To Support A Child With Multiple Disabilities In A Full-Time Virtual School

As was mentioned in the entry on Journal of Online Learning Research – September 2019: Volume 5, Number 2, this is the third article in this new issue.

A Case Study of a Foster Parent Working to Support a Child with Multiple Disabilities in a Full-Time Virtual School

Mary Rice, University of New Mexico, United States ; Kelsey Oritz, Toni Curry, University of Kansas, United States ; Ryan Petropoulos, University of New Mexico, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 5Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

With increases in the number of students enrolling in virtual schools, increases in students with disabilities can also be expected at virtual schools. Further, not all of these students enrolling in virtual schools will live with their biological parents. As students with disabilities move online, they continue to be protected under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). However, these students spend much of the day with their parents or caregivers, if they are supervised at all, which raises questions about the depth and breadth of services that students with disabilities are receiving through their virtual schools. The purpose of this case study was to learn how a foster parent of a student with a disability in a fully online virtual middle school program perceived the school’s response to her child’s needs, as well as how she imagined that the school perceived her. This foster mother determined that virtual school educators could not educate her son in accordance with IDEA. The study offers implications for improving students’ and parents’ virtual school experiences.

Citation

Rice, M., Oritz, K., Curry, T. & Petropoulos, R. (2019). A Case Study of a Foster Parent Working to Support a Child with Multiple Disabilities in a Full-Time Virtual School. Journal of Online Learning Research, 5(2), 145-168. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 25, 2019 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/184933/.

Article Notice – A Newcomer’s Lens: A Look At K-12 Online And Blended Learning In The Journal of Online Learning Research

As was mentioned in the entry on Journal of Online Learning Research – September 2019: Volume 5, Number 2, this is the second article in this new issue.

A Newcomer’s Lens: A Look at K-12 Online and Blended Learning in the Journal of Online Learning Research

Min Hu, Karen Arnesen, Brigham Young University, United States ; Michael K. Barbour, Touro University California, United States ; Heather Leary, Brigham Young University, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 5Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

In this study, the authors analyzed 51 articles published between 2015 and 2018 inclusive in the Journal of Online Learning Research (JOLR). The purpose of this study was to examine the trends regarding article topics, geography, research methods and article types, authorship, and citation frequency. The results indicated that JOLR gave additional attention to K-12 blended learning; compared to the field overall. Another common topic was professional development, with one special issue and the majority of top-cited articles related to this topic. Most of the studies were conducted in the United States, by researchers also located in the US. Finally, more than half of the studies employed inferential and interpretive methods. Future research is needed to examine if the trends from this study continue over a more extended period and if these results reflect the development of and change in the field of K-12 online and blended learning.

Citation

Hu, M., Arnesen, K., Barbour, M.K. & Leary, H. (2019). A Newcomer’s Lens: A Look at K-12 Online and Blended Learning in the Journal of Online Learning Research. Journal of Online Learning Research, 5(2), 123-144. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 25, 2019 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/195231/.

Article Notice – A Time For Reflection: Recognizing Successes And Planning For Improvements

As was mentioned in the entry on Journal of Online Learning Research – September 2019: Volume 5, Number 2, this is the first article in this new issue.

A Time For Reflection: Recognizing Successes and Planning for Improvements

Jered Borup, George Mason University, United States ; Leanna Archambault, Arizona State University, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 5Number 2 ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

For many in the field, the start of the academic year is a time when we update our CVs and reflect on the previous year’s academic accomplishments. Our attention inevitably also turns to unfinished tasks that we were not able to squeeze into a summer that always seems to end up busier than expected. Thankfully the start of the academic year is full of possibilities that can energize our efforts. Similarly this is an important time for the Journal of Online Learning Research (JOLR). We are quickly nearing the end of our fifth year, and while we have accomplished many of our goals, there is much work left to be done. As the field’s growth accelerates, we hope to continue to be a leading publication outlet.

Citation

Borup, J. & Archambault, L. (2019). A Time For Reflection: Recognizing Successes and Planning for Improvements. Journal of Online Learning Research, 5(2), 119-122. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 25, 2019 from https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/210449/.

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