Virtual School Meanderings

November 16, 2016

November 2016: Beyond the Report: Interactive Tools for Practice Change

A final item from Tuesday’s inbox…

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SRI Education Notes - November 2016
Denise Borders

Beyond the Report:
Interactive Tools for Practice Change

In our schools, a wealth of information is available in just a few keystrokes. To support our schools, educational research and tools for improvement also need to be timely and accessible for school leaders. In this issue of Education Notes, we’re featuring examples of online resources that are designed to help educators improve their daily practice, and education leaders to make systemic changes. And be sure to share this newsletter with your colleagues and follow @SRI_Education on Twitter!
Enjoy,
Denise Glyn Borders, President

Data Visualization Toolkit

New Resource on
Data Visualization

SRI’s DaSy Center released a new data visualization toolkitwith tools, resources, and tips for presenting data effectively, on topics such as infographics and interactive displays.

Students working on Chemistry

Designing Next Gen Science Assessments

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) require all students to engage in the practices of scientists and engineers. Having the right kinds of assessments is critically important. Read our NGSS blog.

Student working on homework

Web-Based Math Homework Intervention

SRI evaluated the math intervention ASSISTments, finding positive impacts on students’ math achievement. Read the AERA Open article Online Mathematics Homework Increases Student Achievement.

STEM Teachers

STEM Teacher Leadership Resources

A new SRI-developed website for the U.S. Department of Education, http://stemteacherleadership.org/, offers answers to Frequently Asked Questionsdeveloped by expert STEM practitioners for each of seven different role types in six key topics related to teacher leadership in STEM.

College Students

Community Colleges Launch Degree Programs With Open Educational Resources

To reduce financial burdens on students, the new Open Education Resources (OER) Degree Initiative involves 38 community colleges in the redesign of degree programs using OER in place of proprietary textbooks. SRI Education researchers will evaluate the initiative, including impacts on student outcomes and cost.

South African Students with bikes

Empowering South African Students with Bicycles

SRI evaluated the World Bicycle Relief’s program in South Africa, designed to help rural students get to school more quickly and safely so they can spend less time walking and more time learning. Read the evaluation report.


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SRI Education

SRI Education is tackling the most complex issues in education to help students succeed. We work with federal and state agencies, school districts, major foundations, nonprofit organizations, and international and commercial clients to assess learning gains, use technology for educational innovation, and address risk factors that impede learning.

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October 14, 2016

CTL’s SunBay Math Adopted by Districts in Florida – CTL Research Update – October 2016

Continuing a busy blogging day…

CTL: Insightful design, research, and evaluation of innovative learning environments and assessments

CTL Research Update – October 2016, Issue 25

CTL’s SunBay Math Adopted by Districts in Florida

Students working together on tabletsHow can teachers address rigorous mathematics content while increasing emphasis on “mathematical practices” such as reasoning and communication? Many middle school math teachers struggle with this question as they implement new college- and career-ready standards, such as the Common Core and new Florida Math Standards.

Two of the largest school districts in Florida believe that the tools and strategies embedded throughout SunBay Math™, a program developed by SRI Education, can help teachers answer this question. Both districts used the materials as part of a randomized validation study led by SRI Education with support from the U.S. Department of Education’s Investing in Innovation Fund.

SunBay Math, which is based on more than 25 years of research, uses technology to spotlight six foundational middle school concepts that are known to be hard to learn and hard to teach. Rigorous gold standard experiments have shown that the SunBay materials outperform traditional materials in student learning of the important mathematics concepts of proportionality and linear function. These materials now also include the topics of ratios, rate and proportionality, algebraic expressions and geometric transformations.

SunBay Math is more than technology: It integrates curriculum modules that provide structure to students’ experiences, as well as teacher professional development activities in which teachers learn how to support students as they engage in the types of mathematics activities and practices that lead to deep understanding of key mathematics topics.

Both districts have made SunBay Math materials and professional development available to all of their middle school math teachers and are looking forward to seeing the impact that SunBay Math will have.


Designing Instructionally Supportive Assessments for Science Classrooms

Students working together in a labHaving the right kinds of assessments is critically important because they guide what teachers and students attend to during instruction. High-quality assessments can help teachers implement new standards, help students learn more, and provide equitable opportunities for all students to develop their proficiency with science. The Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) group is a multi-institutional collaborative that is developing classroom-ready assessment tasks for science teachers to gain insights into their students’ progress toward achieving the performance expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards.

The NGSA group is a collaboration among experts in science education and assessment from the Center for Technology in Learning, CREATE for STEM Institute at Michigan State University, Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the Concord Consortium. The NGSA group has recognized the need for a clear and efficient approach to designing assessment tasks that support the teaching and learning of the new standards. Their approach is described in the report “Constructing Assessment Tasks That Blend Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and Science Practices for Classroom Formative Applications.”  To learn more about the NGSA design effort and review the tasks, visit the NGSA website.


Two female students on bicycles in Africa

Bicycles Help Students in South Africa Get to School on Time

SRI Education, with support from the UBS Optimus Foundation, recently completed a study of the World Bicycle Relief (WBR) Bicycles for Educational Empowerment Program (BEEP) in South Africa. The BEEP program distributes bikes to children in rural areas who walk long distances to school, with the goal of getting them to school more quickly and consistently and supporting improved attendance, academic achievement, and family access to resources. The rural South Africa setting provided some unique opportunities and challenges for BEEP, including a lack of existing cycling culture or infrastructure.

From interviews with program participants and families and surveys of students, we found an overwhelmingly favorable response to the bike program, including reports of increased on-time arrival at school and significantly reduced travel times that freed up time for chores and studying. The research also revealed factors that limit the program’s effectiveness, including a lack of bike maintenance that rendered many bikes inoperable for periods of time, girls using their bikes significantly less than boys because of a lack of confidence in their cycling ability and gender norms that work against female cycling, and students’ fears about their physical safety while cycling due to road conditions or inexperience. Learn more about WBR’s commitment to serving the transportation challenges of students and families in these remote communities in our report, “Evaluation of World Bicycle Relief’s Bicycles for Educational Empowerment Program: South Africa Opportunity Study.”


Two female students on bicycles in Africa

CIRCL Hosts National and International Events on STEM Learning

SRI’s Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL) and NSF recently hosted two large events in Washington DC: a symposium on Active Learning in STEM Education and a forum on Next Generation STEM High Schools. The events — which engaged 213 K-12 teachers receiving thePresidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching and more than 70 leading education scholars and researchers – were designed to give participants the opportunity to share best practices in STEM learning, explore new ways to encourage students to engage and envision themselves as STEM professionals, and advance the dialogue on what could – and should – constitute the next-generation teaching and learning environment in our nation’s schools. Chief Technology Officer of the United States Megan Smith spoke about the need to work together to instill confidence in students to pursue STEM, SRI’s Barbara Means shared research showing that inclusive STEM high schools have enough duration and intensity to change student goals and self-perception, and keynote speaker Bill Penuel discussed ways to organize active learning in our schools and communities. Summaries are available on the event websites and in a White House Blog.

On September 12, CIRCL hosted a workshop before the European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL) in Lyon, France. A group of 23 researchers from the United States, Europe, the United Kingdom, and Israel discussed research agendas on three themes: computational thinking, embodied learning, and crossover learning (bridging formal and informal spaces). The themes were selected from the “2015 Innovating Pedagogy Report” and helped focus the conversation. Representatives from NSF and the European Commission weighed in on their funding priorities and how they related to the three themes. The workshop participants are now writing recommendations for future research agendas on these topics and will share them broadly when completed.

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News:

Open Educational Resources: Nearing an Inflection Point for Adoption?

Developing a Research Base to Evaluate Digital Courseware

Designing for Consistent Implementation of a 5th Grade Digital Math Curriculum

Strategizing Teacher Professional Development for Classroom Uses of Geospatial Data and Tools

Iteratively Refining a Science Explanation Tool Through Classroom Implementation and Stakeholder Partnerships

Different Levels of Leadership for Learning: Investigating Differences Between Teachers Individually and Collectively Using Multilevel Factor Analysis of the 2011-2012 Schools and Staffing Survey

Quoted:

Study Profiles Maker-Space Educators and Their Needs

The Essential Components of STEM Education

What Motivates Maker Educators?

Can All Students Succeed at Science and Technology High Schools?

Blog Posts:

Report Tackles Assessment Design for Next Generation Science Standards

Evaluating and Understanding STEM Teaching and Learning in Early Childhood

Technology for Learning Mathematics: What Can We Learn from Large-Scale Studies?

Cyberlearning ’16 Tackles Designs for Deeper, Broader, and More Equitable Learning


Stay Connected

Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page. Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page. Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page. Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page.

Contact CTL


SRI Education

SRI Education, a division of SRI International, is tackling the most complex issues in education to help students succeed. We work with federal and state agencies, school districts, major foundations, nonprofit organizations, and international and commercial clients to address risk factors that impede learning, assess learning gains, and use technology for educational innovation. The mission of SRI’sCenter for Technology in Learning (CTL) is to improve learning and teaching through innovation and inquiry. Much of our work is conducted in educational settings such as classrooms, afterschool programs, and teacher education programs.


SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave. Menlo Park, CA 94025

SRI International creates world-changing solutions making people safer, healthier, and more productive.
© 2016 SRI International. SRI International is a registered trademark and SRI Education is a trademark of SRI International.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

September 3, 2016

New Year, New Learning, New Look | SRI Education Notes | September 2016

Also from Thursday’s inbox…

Welcome to SRI Education Notes, a bi-monthly newsletter
from SRI Education.
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SRI Education Notes September 2016
Borders

New Year, New Learning, New Look

As we begin the 2016-2017 school year, SRI Education is pleased to bring you several new reports on what works in education and debut our updated format. Learn about preschool STEM initiatives, new formative assessments in early childhood education, technology for learning math, and good news about equitable access to International Baccalaureate programs. And be sure to share this newsletter with your colleagues and follow @SRI_Education on Twitter!

Enjoy,
Denise Glyn Borders, President

Student working on laptop

Changing the World of Mathematics Education

At the International Congress of Mathematics Education,Jeremy Roschelle discussed the role of scale and effectiveness in enabling math technologies to achieve societal impact. Read more…

Teacher with early ed students

Playing is Learning:  STEM Starts Early

SRI Education is helping to shape the field of early STEM learning. Read about our preschool STEM research and development efforts, evaluations, and assessment initiatives in our recent blog.

Students and Teacher

Bridging the Equity Gap in IB

Participation of low-income students in the International Baccalaureate (B) Diploma Programme increased from 2008 to 2014, according to ourevaluation report.

Students and Kindergarten Teachers

Case Studies of KEA in MD, OR, PA, and WA

Kindergarten Entry Assessments are being used in four states to inform policy & practice in early childhood education. Full report, Summary.

College Student Writing

SRI Education Begins Evaluating CRWP in High-needs Schools

In our May Education Notes, we described our evaluation of the College-Ready Writers Program. We are excited to start a new study of its scale-up in urban and rural schools.


Follow @SRI_Education for the latest in education research!

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SRI Education

SRI Education is tackling the most complex issues in education to help students succeed. We work with federal and state agencies, school districts, major foundations, nonprofit organizations, and international and commercial clients to assess learning gains, use technology for educational innovation, and address risk factors that impede learning.

Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page. Click here to go to the SRI Education Twitter page Click here to go to the SRI YouTube page. Click here to go to the SRI LinkedIn page. Click here to go to the SRI Google+ page.

Forward this email to a friend.

© 2016 SRI International. SRI Education is a division of SRI International. SRI International is a registered trademark and SRI Education is a trademark of SRI International. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025

June 22, 2016

Cyberlearning 2016: Designing for Deeper, Broader, and More Equitable Learning – CTL Research Update –

From yesterday’s inbox…

CTL: Insightful design, research, and evaluation of innovative learning environments and assessments

CTL Research Update – June 2016, Issue 24

Cyberlearning 2016: Designing for Deeper, Broader, and More Equitable Learning

Cyberlearning photo collageOn June 5 and 6, approximately 180 leading researchers along with students, educators, designers, industry experts, and other stakeholders worked together for two days at Cyberlearning 2016 to accelerate the community’s collective work and impact. Cyberlearning 2016 builds on research funded by the National Science Foundation and three prior successful meetings in, 2015, 2014, and 2013, which inspired the community to identify issues of common interest and ignited joint efforts among participants. Watch the archived keynote addresses by Andrew Coy (White House OSTP), Jim Shelton(Chan-Zuckerberg), Peggy Weil (USC Cinematic Arts), Nichole Pinkard (Digital Youth Network), andLinda Chaput (AgileMind) and check out the online conversation via the twitter hashtag #NSFCL16 or this storify.


What Is Next Generation Preschool Science?

Screenshot from the Next Gen Math VideoNext Generation Preschool Science brings together education researchers from the Center for Technology in Learning and Education Development Center (EDC), public media producers from WGBH, and preschool teachers and children to create rich early science curricula that integrate tablet-based and traditional learning experiences. Thanks to funding from the National Science Foundation, the team has embarked on a research and development process with the goal of promoting preschoolers’ understanding of science concepts, engagement in science practices, and science discourse as well as supporting preschool educators in the classroom. Watch the video to see more about what we’ve been making!


Reflections on the Ready To Learn Initiative, 2010 to 2015

Student using an iPad with teacherCarlin Llorente and Savitha Moorthy are co-authors of a new report, Reflections on the Ready to Learn Initiative, 2010 to 2015 and a related article “Dramatic change, persistent challenges: a five-year view of children’s educational media as resources for equity” in the Journal of Children and Media. Together EDC and SRI authors describe progress and potential leverage points in using educational media and community engagement to enhance the school readiness and success of children living in low-income households. As the summative evaluation partners to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS, EDC, and SRI measured children’s learning outcomes under Ready To Learn for a decade. This report draws on interviews with 26 prominent children’s media researchers, producers, and thought leaders and a review of scholarly articles and reports to provide a big-picture view of the status and future directions of children’s media. (Photo courtesy of WNED.)


Bill Gates keynote address at the Arizona State University Global Silicon Valley Summit

Education Technology That Supports Struggling Students

On April 20, Bill Gates cited ourLessons Learned from Early Implementations of Adaptive Courseware in his keynote address at the Arizona State University Global Silicon Valley Summit. Adaptive learning courseware uses computer algorithms to analyze data collected as students interact with online learning environments.

The Lessons Learned report was also featured in an April EdSurge article. CTL Researcher Vanessa Peters wrote the opinion piece How Can Technology Impact Outcomes in Introductory College Courses?


Cover of book Meeting the Challenges to Measurement in an Era of Accountability

CTL’s Assessment Group Writes Two Chapters on the Evidence-Centered Design Process

CTL’s Assessment Group is pleased to announce the publication of two new chapters describing our evidence-centered design process in the most recent volume of the National Council of Measurement in Education’s book series. The first chapter, “General introduction to evidence-centered design,” introduces the reader to the evidence-centered design process. The second chapter, “Assessing the life sciences: Using evidence-centered design for accountability purposes,” applies evidence-centered design for purposes of assessing student’s knowledge and skills in science. Read Meeting the Challenges to Measurement in an Era of Accountability.


Photo of adults working together

How Research Can Raise the Bar on Developing Adults’ Skills in 21st Century Careers

In the United States today, millions of people are unemployed and underemployed—making economic stability out of reach for themselves and their families. These numbers are not driven solely by lack of education or technical knowledge, but also by a broad need in the workforce to develop adults’ personal success skills. CTL and the Joyce Foundation recently released the reportEmpowering Adults to Thrive at Work: Personal Success Skills for 21st Century Jobs that discusses how evidence-based research provides guidance for promoting personal success skills for adults who are striving to build sustainable 21st century careers.

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News:

Innovation Lab Maps the Future of Learning in Smart and Connected Communities

New Report Calls STEM Learning a “Social Justice” Issue

Popularity of Ed Tech Not Necessarily Linked to Products’ Impact

Reports:

Constructing Assessment Tasks That Blend Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and Science Practices for Classroom Formative Applications

Influences on the Scaling of Digital Learning Resources

Blog Posts:

New Report Highlights Key Findings from Next Generation STEM Schools Forum

Characteristics of Successful Inclusive STEM High Schools and Their Impact on Student Outcomes

Assessing the Value of Social Capital for Youth Across Multiple Learning Environments

Developing an Early Mathematics Assessment to Evaluate School Readiness for Young Learners

Measuring Student Learning About Computing

Balancing Widespread Use and Positive Learning Impacts of Educational Technology


Don’t miss our September issue!

Learn about why large school districts are adopting SRI’sSunBay Middle School Digital Math programs as part of their core mathematics curriculum.

AND! Learn about the Next Generation Science Assessmentproject, which is developing NGSS-aligned assessments and curricula for the next generation of K-12 students.


Stay Connected

Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page. Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page. Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page.

Contact CTL


SRI Education

SRI Education, a division of SRI International, is tackling the most complex issues in education to help students succeed. We work with federal and state agencies, school districts, major foundations, nonprofit organizations, and international and commercial clients to address risk factors that impede learning, assess learning gains, and use technology for educational innovation. The mission of SRI’sCenter for Technology in Learning (CTL) is to improve learning and teaching through innovation and inquiry. Much of our work is conducted in educational settings such as classrooms, afterschool programs, and teacher education programs.


SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave. Menlo Park, CA 94025
SRI International creates world-changing solutions making people safer, healthier, and more productive.
© 2016 SRI International. SRI International is a registered trademark and SRI Education is a trademark of SRI International.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

May 27, 2016

Promoting the Fundamentals for Success Among Diverse Learners | SRI Education Notes | May 2016

Also from Wednesday’s inbox…

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SRI Education Notes

Denise Glyn Borders Vice President, SRI Education

Promoting the Fundamentals for Success Among Diverse Learners

At SRI Education, we know that incremental improvement is not going to be enough to help our society succeed in the 21st century. That’s why all our research aims to tackle accelerated learning and foundations for success, including writing, coding, and personal success skills. And we aim to provide these foundations to all learners, including children, adults, and those with autism or other special needs. Below, four stories share how our recently completed studies are making an impact on fundamentals for success among diverse learners. You’ll also find some mentions of recent awards earned by SRI researchers, as well as links to news on our work on the right.

Enjoy,
Denise Glyn Borders
President, SRI Education

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Follow @SRI_Education for the latest in education research!Whether it’s a gathering of NSF-funded STEM researchers, a White House summit on next-generation STEM high schools, or an education research conference, we’ll be your eyes and ears to discover news, key findings, and useful resources. Be sure to add us to your education Twitter lists. @SRI_Education

Photo of Barbara Means tweet on evidence and edtech tools

:: In the News

Improving Teacher Evaluation

Our March 2016 report Replacing Teacher Evaluation Systems with Systems of Professional Growth: Lessons from Three California School Districts and Their Teachers’ Unions was the subject of the April 13thEdSource article, Districts, unions innovate to evaluate teachers.

Photo of Bill Gates speaking

Education Technology That Supports Struggling Students

On April 20, Bill Gates cited our Lessons Learned from Early Implementations of Adaptive Courseware in his keynote address at the Arizona State University Global Silicon Valley Summit. Adaptive learning courseware uses computer algorithms to analyze data collected as students interact with online learning environments.

This project was also featured in an April 18national education news article. SRI Education Researcher Vanessa Peters wrote an opinion piece, How Can Technology Impact Outcomes in Introductory College Courses? for EdSurge.


:: Stay Connected

Go to the SRI Education Twitter page

Click here to go to the SRI Facebook page. Click here to go to the SRI Education Twitter page Click here to go to the SRI YouTube page. Click here to go to the SRI LinkedIn page. Click here to go to the SRI Google+ page.


SRI Education is tackling the most complex issues in education to help students succeed. We work with federal and state agencies, school districts, major foundations, nonprofit organizations, and international and commercial clients to assess learning gains, use technology for educational innovation, and address risk factors that impede learning.

Visit sri.com/education.

SRI Education
333 Ravenswood Avenue
Menlo Park, CA 94025

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Suite 2800 (28th floor)
Arlington, VA 22209

© 2016 SRI International. SRI Education is a division of SRI International. SRI International is a registered trademark and SRI Education is a trademark of SRI International. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Adults working together

How Research Can Raise the Bar on Developing Adults’ Skills in 21st Century Careers

In the United States today, millions of people are unemployed and underemployed—making economic stability out of reach for themselves and their families. These numbers are not driven solely by lack of education or technical knowledge, but also by a broad need in the workforce to develop adults’ personal success skills.SRI Education and the Joyce Foundation recently released a report that discusses how evidence-based research provides guidance for promoting personal success skills for adults who are striving to build sustainable 21st century careers.

Personal success skills are the capabilities that enable adults to deal with the challenges, relationships, transitions, and social systems that make up working life. Important abilities include basic job readiness, self-directed learning, self-management, personal responsibility, effective communication, career management, and everyday problem solving. “In our world of rapidly changing technology, workforce needs, and economic conditions, people need well-developed personal success skills to get good jobs and keep them,” said Nikki Shechtman, senior researcher for SRI Education and lead author on the report. Learn more about the report, Empowering Adults to Thrive at Work, from our recent blog post.

Girl working in a computer lab

Measuring Student Learning About Computing

President Obama’s recent initiative Computer Science for All (CS4All) emphasizes the need to teach computer science as part of the regular K-12 curriculum. An important part of teaching is measuring learning; teachers measure student learning so that they can better help students learn. Likewise, students and parents want schools to document what students know about computational thinking, and what they can do with that knowledge. Whereas tests exist for conventional school subjects like math, there are almost no relevant assessments available for K-12 learning about computer science education – and a lack of assessments could adversely effect the growth of Computer Science for All.

SRI researchers are addressing this pressing need by defining effective assessments of difficult-to-measure concepts in computer science education in ways that are appropriate for K-12 settings. Evidence-based assessment of student learningis at the heart of what researchers in SRI Education’s Center for Technology in Learning have been focused on for decades. Building on this foundation, we’re leading the application of new methods and technologies to design effective assessments of difficult-to-measure problems in computer science education. To learn more about the design of these assessments, see the full blog post from Daisy Rutstein and Shuchi Grover.

Students in a classroom

Turning Autism Research into Support for Learning

Autism affects people and their ability to function in a variety of ways across the spectrum. For those who have mild to moderate autism and are considered “high functioning,” many do well in high school but fare poorly in postsecondary settings. In fact, the vast majority of students with autism do not go to college and have one of the lowest college enrollment rates across all disability categories and the general population. To learn more about this issue and probe for potential solutions, SRI researchers spent the past four years completing 12 studies on supporting transition-age youth and young adults with autism. These studies relied on data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2), which was conducted by SRI for the U.S. Department of Education and collected data from more than 11,000 high school students receiving special education services over 10 years.

The first major finding, which led to many other questions, was that 34 percent of people who have autism and attend college choose science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) majors, which is a significantly higher proportion than any other disability group and much higher than the general population, which is closer to about 20 percent. Read more findings from the 12 studies in Jennifer Yu’s blog post, Turning Autism Research into Support for Learning.

Students writing

Teacher Professional Development Can Make a Positive Impact on Students’ Writing Skills

Can teacher professional development have a positive impact on students’ writing skills? To explore this question, a research team from SRI’s Center for Education Policy conducted a two-year randomized controlled trial of the National Writing Project’s College-Ready Writers Program (CRWP). CRWP combines professional development, curricular resources, and formative assessment. The program was implemented in 22 districts across 10 states delivered by 12 Writing Project sites. While many studies of professional development programs have been randomized controlled trials, most have found no impact on student academic outcomes. However, this study found a positive, statistically significant effect on the four attributes of student argument writing—content, structure, stance, and conventions—measured by the National Writing Project’s (NWP) Analytic Writing Continuum for Source-Based Argument.

The National Writing Project invited the study’s principal investigator, Alix Gallagher, to join a presentation on Capitol Hill to share the evaluation results with Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), ranking member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, as well as other interested policymakers. This unique opportunity allowed SRI researchers to bring important findings directly to the individuals who have the authority to set policy and affect change. To read more about these exciting findings, see Dr. Gallagher’s recent blog post.

AERA 2016 logo

SRI Education’s Daniela Torre & Jared Boyce Receive AERA 2016 Dissertation Awards!

AERA Dissertation Awards recognize the exceptional research accomplishments of recent doctoral graduates. This year, Daniela Torre received the Division L (Educational Policy and Politics) Dissertation of the Year award for her dissertation, How Classroom Context Impacts the Academic Achievement of English Learners in a New Immigrant Destination.  Dr. Torre earned her Ph.D. in leadership and policy studies in the Department of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations at Vanderbilt Univeristy. She is currently a researcher in our Center for Education Policy, where she works on the Evaluation of IDEA’s Charter School Program grant in Texas funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Evaluation of the New Generation of Educators Initiative in California funded by the Bechtel Foundation, and the Evaluation of the McKnight Foundation’s Education and Learning Program.

Jared Boyce received the 2016 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Advanced Studies of National Databases Special Interest Group for his dissertation, Commitment and Leadership: What We Know From the Schools and Staffing Survey. Dr. Boyce earned his Ph.D. in educational leadership from Teachers College at Columbia University. He is currently a researcher in our Center for Technology in Learning, where he works on a variety of projects, including the Next-Generation Courseware Challenge, the Data-Intensive Exploration of the Links Between SES and STEM Learning, and the Montana Continuous Improvement in Education Research to Improve Secondary School Literacy Outcomes.

This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com.

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