Virtual School Meanderings

March 9, 2017

SITE 2017 – Tech2Teach: Making the Future Ready Shift through a Blended Learning Initiative

The thirty-seventh session that I am blogging here at SITE 2017 related to K-12 Online and Blended Learning is:

Tech2Teach: Making the Future Ready Shift through a Blended Learning Initiative

  1. Kenton Smith, MSD Washington Township, United States
  2. Seth Hamilton, MSD Washington Township, United States

Thursday, March 9 2:05-2:25 PM

No presider for this session.

MSD of Washington Township launched a pilot program, Tech2Teach, during the 2015-2016 school year. This program, based on the Future Ready Schools Framework, was designed to connect teachers to new literacies and learning tools as a component of curriculum development and instruction. The initial purpose of the pilot was to engage teachers in the process of developing a vision and culture for digital learning and personalized professional development. The selected teachers collaborated with district coaches and leaders to maximize digital learning opportunities in their schools. This paper explores the Tech2Teach program design as well as the strategies that helped shape and redefine student learning experiences. Now in its second year, Tech2Teach includes select departments and grade level teams participating in the program. The district offers its challenges, successes, and future plans to help guide other districts through a similar design model.

ID
50517
Type
Best Practices
Topics
Distance/Flexible Education K-12 Online Learning Teaching and Learning with Emerging Technologies

So I’m on the shuttle on my way back to the airport.  So if you are in the room, please post your notes below.

SITE 2017 – Virtual Schools Are COOL But A Hot Topic: Exploring The Proposed Introduction Of Virtual Charter Schools In New Zealand

The thirty-sixth session that I am blogging here at SITE 2017 related to K-12 Online and Blended Learning is:

Virtual schools are COOL but a hot topic: Exploring the proposed introduction of virtual charter schools in New Zealand

  1. Keryn Pratt, University of Otago, New Zealand
  2. Sandra Williamson-Leadley

    Sandra Williamson-Leadley

    University of Otago College of Education
    Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand

    , University of Otago, New Zealand

Thursday, March 9 1:45 PM-2:45 PM

Presider: {% thumbnail paper.presentation.session.presider.user.profile.photo “micro” crop=”center” as photo % Federica Incerti, Ohio University, United States

A proposal is currently with the New Zealand Parliament, suggesting that students in the compulsory schooling sector be able to complete part or all of their schooling online. These online programmes would be able to be offered by Communities of Online Learning (COOLs), who could be current schools, higher education institutions, or private or community-based organisations. In general, the reactions to this proposal have been negative, with numerous concerns raised about the possibility. This round table will explore the New Zealand context and present the relevant parts of the proposed Bill, before exploring the reactions to it. Attendees will then be encouraged to participate in a discussion around the proposed changes, bringing lessons learned from experiences in their own country.

ID
50235
Type
Roundtable
Topic
K-12 Online Learning

I really wish I could be in this session, but I’m on the shuttle on my way back to the airport.  So if you are in the room, please post your notes below.

SITE 2017 – Fostering Creativity and Innovation through Inquiry and Adventure in Online Learning

The thirty-fifth session that I am blogging here at SITE 2017 related to K-12 Online and Blended Learning is:

Fostering Creativity and Innovation through Inquiry and Adventure in Online Learning

  1. Aaron Doering, University of Minnesota, United States
  2. Jeni Henrickson

    Jeni Henrickson

    University of Minnesota
    Saint Paul, MN

    , University of Minnesota, United States

Thursday, March 9 11:50 AM-12:10 PM

No presider for this session.

Self-directed, inquiry-based learning opportunities focused on transdisciplinary real-world problem solving have been shown to foster creativity in learners. This study examines an adventure-based online learning environment and the role the learning environment design and teacher pedagogy and practice played in influencing creativity in the classroom. Data were gathered via interviews, direct observation, and focus groups as 95 high school students guided by 1 teacher worked in small groups to collaboratively design and present geography research using the WeExplore adventure learning environment. Findings indicate that teacher and student creativity were impacted by the unique learning environment design, the opportunity to define self-identified driving questions, the process of collaborative group work, and the opportunity to combine traditional research approaches with arts-influenced ones.

ID
50755
Type
Brief Paper
Topics
K-12 Online Learning New Possibilities with Information Technologies Creativity

Note that I am in a different session right now (as SITE has a habit this week of double booking several items).  So if there is anyone in the room that would like to share their notes, please post them in the comments below.

SITE 2017 – The Role Of Learning Strategies In Online Language Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

The thirty-four session that I am blogging here at SITE 2017 related to K-12 Online and Blended Learning is:

The role of learning strategies in online language learning: A structural equation modeling analysis

  1. Chin-Hsi Lin, Michigan State University, United States
  2. Yining Zhang, Michigan State University, United States
  3. Binbin Zheng, Michigan State University, United States

Thursday, March 9 11:50 AM-12:10 PM

No presider for this session.

Students’ active regulation of learning, through a variety of cognitive and metacognitive strategies, is crucial to their online learning success. Despite the large numbers enrolled in online language courses, very little is known about students’ strategy use in these learning environments, or how such strategies may affect their online learning outcomes. This study aims to fill this gap by examining students’ learning-strategy use across a number of online language courses, and investigating the role of learning strategies within the framework of self-regulated learning.This study collected data on the online language-learning strategies used by 466 high-school students who were taking various online language courses in a Midwestern virtual school. Our findings indicated that students in the sample used online learning strategies at a moderate level in their language learning process.

ID
50785
Type
Brief Paper
Topic
K-12 Online Learning

Note that I am in a different session right now (as SITE has a habit this week of double booking several items).  So if there is anyone in the room that would like to share their notes, please post them in the comments below.

SITE 2017 – Perceptions of K-12 Online Teaching Endorsement Program Effectiveness in Georgia: A Case Study

The thirty-three session that I am blogging here at SITE 2017 related to K-12 Online and Blended Learning is:

Perceptions of K-12 Online Teaching Endorsement Program Effectiveness in Georgia: A Case Study

  1. Leslie Pourreau, Kennesaw State University, United States
  2. Anissa Lokey-Vega, Kennesaw State University, United States

Thursday, March 9 11:50 AM-12:10 PM

No presider for this session.

This qualitative case study examined professional educators’ beliefs and perceptions about K-12 online teaching endorsement (OTE) practices in the state of Georgia based on interviews with three University System of Georgia teacher educators, one Georgia K-12 virtual school administrator, and two Georgia K-12 virtual school educators plus personal narrative observations from the primary investigator. Data collected came from one-one-one semi-structured interviews, the personal narrative, and the Georgia OTE standards. Analysis showed that issues and concerns raised by the participants about current K-12 OTE preparation practices reflected real problems and challenges related to a lack of customized virtual educator training, educator perceptions or misconceptions about online instruction and technology knowledge, and virtual setting imperfections. Findings highlighted issues with current Georgia OTE standards perceived as training issues and barriers to success for virtual educators.

ID
50742
Type
Brief Paper
Topic
K-12 Online Learning

Note that I am in a different session right now (as SITE has a habit this week of double booking several items).  So if there is anyone in the room that would like to share their notes, please post them in the comments below.

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