Virtual School Meanderings

May 27, 2020

SITE 2020 – Better Supporting Online And Blended Students Through Academic Communities Of Engagement

My colleague, Jered Borup, shared the YouTube video of the presentation that was done on the conceptual framework that he has been developing over the past few years.

You can access the journal article that this session was based on by clicking here.

May 5, 2020

Open Access: View SITE 2020 Keynote & Invited Talks

Like I say at some point most days these days, I’m getting a backlog in items that I want to post, so I’ll start posting them more frequently for the rest of the day.

Note these resources from the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education.

View this email in your browser
View the Keynotes on LearnTechLib
These recorded talks are offered Open Access,
and are available to all!
View These Keynotes & Invited Talks
  • Making the Future: The Future of Making
  • Mapping for a Better World
  • Beyond the Digital Revolution: Tertiary/Post-Secondary Education in the Age of Disruption
  • Critical Concerns with Using Digital Tools and Apps during Emergency Remote Teaching
  • Using Innovative Technologies to Support STEM Teaching and Learning
  • The Triple E Framework: Using Research-Based Strategies for Technology Integration
Join us at SITE 2021 in San Diego, CA,

March 29 – April 2, 2021.

Accepted and presented conference papers are published in the Conference Proceedings & internationally distributed by LearnTechLib.org.
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April 16, 2020

SITE 2020 – A Newcomer’s Lens: A Look At K-12 Online And Blended Learning In The Journal Of Online Learning Research

This past week the 2020 annual conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education was held virtually.  I didn’t attend, but since both presentations I was involved in were done in an asynchronous format, I figured it was worth sharing them here for a broader audience.  Yesterday I posted the first presentation, today I want to post the second one, which was…

A Newcomer’s Lens: A Look at K-12 Online and Blended Learning in the Journal of Online Learning Research

ID: 56448Type: Virtual Paper
  1. Min Hu and Karen Arnesen, Brigham Young University, United States
  2. Michael K. Barbour, Touro University California, United States
  3. Heather Leary, Brigham Young University, United States

Abstract: In this study, the authors analyzed 51 articles published between 2015 and 2018 inclusive in the Journal of Online Learning Research (JOLR). The purpose of this study was to examine the trends regarding article topics, geography, research methods and article types, authorship, and citation frequency. The results indicated that JOLR gave additional attention to K-12 blended learning; compared to the field overall. Another common topic was professional development, with one special issue and the majority of top-cited articles related to this topic. Most of the studies were conducted in the United States, by researchers also located in the US. Finally, more than half of the studies employed inferential and interpretive methods. Future research is needed to examine if the trends from this study continue over a more extended period and if these results reflect the development of and change in the field of K-12 online and blended learning.

Topic

The presentation is available at:

You can see a list of all of the K-12 distance, online, and blended learning sessions here.

April 15, 2020

SITE 2020 – Irrelevant, Overlooked, Or Lost? Trends In 20 years Of Uncited And Low Cited K-12 Online Learning Articles

This past week the 2020 annual conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education was held virtually.  I didn’t attend, but since both presentations I was involved in were done in an asynchronous format, I figured it was worth sharing them here for a broader audience.  The first was…

Irrelevant, overlooked, or lost? Trends in 20 years of uncited and low cited K-12 online learning articles

ID: 56438Type: Virtual Paper
  1. Karen Arnesen, Brigham Young University, United States
  2. Shea Walters, George Mason University, United States
  3. Michael Barbour, Touro University California, United States
  4. Jered Borup, George Mason University, United States

Abstract: We analyzed the uncited or low cited articles from Arnesen et al. (2019), who examined the trends in K-12 online learning articles from 1994 to 2016. We identified 62 articles that had five or fewer citations, and analyzed them for trends in authorship, publication outlets, dates of publication, and topics that could help explain their low citation numbers. We also analyzed topics to see what contribution they might have made and can still make to the field. We found that the majority of these articles had been published in many different, less well-known journals. We also found that these articles may have attracted fewer readers because they addressed topics that seemed to have a narrow focus, often outside of the US. The articles were also authored by both well-known researchers and one-time authors. What we did not find were uninteresting, poorly researched, or irrelevant articles. Many of the articles described and discussed programs that grappled with and overcame some of the same challenges online learning still faces today: issues of interaction, community, technology, management, etc.. Some of the early articles gave interesting insights into the history of the field, especially as it involved rural learners and programs. Others addressed less mainstream but still interesting topics such as librarians in online learning, cross-border AP history classes, policies that helped or hindered the growth of online learning, and practical considerations of cost and access.

Topic

The presentation is available at:

You can see a list of all of the K-12 distance, online, and blended learning sessions here.

April 7, 2020

K-12 Online Learning

Note the K-12 Online Learning SIG’s business meeting is tomorrow.  Maybe the SIG leadership will open this up to everyone, and not just those that paid the ~$250 virtual registration fee, to attend.

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education

Dear Michael Barbour,

We are looking forward to seeing you at SITE 2020 Online!

The K-12 Online Learning SIG Meeting is 4:15-5:15 ET on Wednesday, April 8th. Please join us!

Please review the schedule to see the live and virtual sessions offered this year: https://academicexperts.org/conf/site/2020/

Sincerely,
K-12 Online Learning Chairs
Cecil R Short and Jacqueline Zweig

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