Virtual School Meanderings

October 20, 2020

NEPC Talks Education: Exploring Why Teachers Leave the Profession of Teaching

An item from the National Education Policy Center.

NEPC Talks Education offers insightful programming on a variety of significant education policy and practice topics for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Publication Announcement

NEPC Talks Education: Exploring Why Teachers Leave the Profession of Teaching

KEY TAKEAWAY:

NEPC Talks Education offers insightful programming on a variety of significant education policy and practice topics for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

CONTACT:

William J. Mathis:

(802) 383-0058

wmathis@sover.net

Christopher Saldaña:

(303) 492-2566

christopher.saldana@colorado.edu

TwitterEmail Address

BOULDER, CO (October 20, 2020) – In this month’s episode of the NEPC Talks Education podcast, NEPC Researcher Christopher Saldaña interviews Dr. Doris Santoro, a professor in the education department at Bowdoin College. Santoro, author of Demoralized: Why Teachers Leave the Profession They Love and How They Can Stay and co-editor of Principled Resistance: How Teachers Resolve Ethical Dilemmas, is an expert in the moral and ethical sources of teacher dissatisfaction and resistance.

Santoro argues that because researchers tend to focus on the individual characteristics of teachers when examining teachers’ decisions to stop teaching, their findings often result in explanations of teacher turnover, such as being a poor fit for the profession or no longer being drawn to teaching. She points out that these explanations cannot, however, explain why teachers who still love teaching decide to leave it.

Santoro argues that teacher demoralization offers a better conceptual frame for understanding why teachers who love teaching decide to exit the profession. She explains that, in contrast to an individual-focused theory such as teacher “burnout,” teacher demoralization requires researchers to consider what characteristics of a teacher’s teaching environment and context might undermine the moral and ethical reasons that motivated them to join the profession in the first place. For example, Santoro explains that teachers are often demoralized by school practices and policies such as tracking and scripted curricula that diminish their agency and reinforce inequity. She is particularly concerned for teachers now, as they attempt to address the serious inequities posed by remote learning.

Santoro encourages teachers to think about the moral and ethical reasons they joined the profession, and consider how they can emphasize and reinforce those values in their everyday practice. She recommends that teachers form communities of like-minded educators and use these communities as a means of strength and support. She also encourages policymakers and school leaders to listen to teachers, especially their concerns about what practices and policies they find to be most demoralizing. For example, in response to the pandemic, Santoro argues that an important way to support teachers is to ensure that all students have access to the tools they need to connect with their teacher during remote learning.

A new NEPC Talks Education podcast episode, hosted by Christopher Saldaña, will be released each month from September through May.

Don’t worry if you miss a month. All episodes are archived on the NEPC website and can be found here.

NEPC podcast episodes are also available on Apple PodcastsSpotify, and Stitcher, under the title NEPC Talks Education. Subscribe and follow!

The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), a university research center housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu

Copyright 2020 National Education Policy Center. All rights reserved.

September 17, 2020

Subscribe to the New NEPC Talks Education Monthly Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher

Another item from the National Education Policy Center.

NEPC Talks Education offers insightful programming on a variety of significant education policy and practice topics for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Publication Announcement

Subscribe to the New NEPC Talks Education Monthly Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher

KEY TAKEAWAY:

NEPC Talks Education offers insightful programming on a variety of significant education policy and practice topics for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

CONTACT:

William J. Mathis:

(802) 383-0058

wmathis@sover.net

Christopher Saldaña:

(303) 492-2566

christopher.saldana@colorado.edu

TwitterEmail Address

BOULDER, CO (September 16, 2020) – Loyal NEPC Education Interview of the Month listeners, as well as people discovering NEPC Talks Education for the first time, will find it easier than ever to plug into the smart, engaging conversations about education policy hosted each month from September through May by NEPC Researcher Christopher Saldaña.

Subscribe to the NEPC Talks Education podcast on Apple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher. You can also find episodes on our website, or search for “NEPC Talks Education” on any of the platform homepages.

In the first NEPC Talks Education podcast of 2020-2021, Saldaña explores with University of California Berkeley professor Janelle Scott the equity concerns raised by the emergence of learning pods. Future podcasts will take up topics such as the push for digital technologies in distance and in-person learning, the demoralization of K-12 teachers, and how school funding might be transformed in the near future.

Stay tuned in to NEPC for smart, engaging conversations about education policy. Don’t worry if you miss a month. Starting in 2020-2021 all NEPC Talks Education podcasts will be archived on Apple PodcastsSpotify, and Stitcher, as well as on the NEPC website.

All of our previous Education Interview of the Month episodes can also be found on the NEPC website.

The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), a university research center housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu

Copyright 2020 National Education Policy Center. All rights reserved.

NEPC Talks Education: Examining the Emergence of K-12 Learning Pods

An item from the National Education Policy Center.

NEPC Talks Education offers insightful programming on a variety of significant education policy and practice topics for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Publication Announcement

NEPC Talks Education: Examining the Emergence of K-12 Learning Pods

KEY TAKEAWAY:

NEPC Talks Education offers insightful programming on a variety of significant education policy and practice topics for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

CONTACT:

William J. Mathis:

(802) 383-0058

wmathis@sover.net

Christopher Saldaña:

(303) 492-2566

christopher.saldana@colorado.edu

TwitterEmail Address

BOULDER, CO (September 15, 2020) – In this month’s NEPC Talks Education podcast episode, NEPC Researcher Christopher Saldaña interviews Dr. Janelle T. Scott, the Robert C. and Mary Catherine Birgeneau Distinguished Chair in Educational Disparities at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Scott is an expert in educational policy and equality of opportunity in education and co-author of the book, The Politics of Education Policy in an Era of Inequality: Possibilities for Democratic Schooling.

Scott and Saldaña discuss how some parents have responded to the challenges of remote learning by pooling their resources and sharing their time to form “learning pods” for their children. While this has obvious benefits for some children, it also means that children without access to learning pods or other resources will have constrained educational opportunities. Scott points out that this exacerbates educational inequities that result from factors such as poverty and race.

Scott argues that the emergence of learning pods has been caused in part by a failure of the federal government to provide schools with the resources and guidance necessary to reopen safely. She points out that the federal government could have, for example, supported the successful reopening of schools by making early investments in their physical infrastructure, in personal protective equipment for teachers, staff, and students, and in high-quality technology and broadband for students who need them. Scott explains how the failure of the government to do any of these things well will continue to weigh most heavily on students who were already most challenged in their pursuit of educational opportunity, as more privileged families use their resources to compensate for the government’s failures.

Scott sees the possibility for significant and meaningful positive change in K-12 public education if parents and families – both those participating in a learning pod and those who continue to work with their local public school – engage in the political process and advocate for local, state, and federal policies that offer access to essential resources for all students and families.

A new NEPC Talks Education podcast episode, hosted by NEPC Researcher Christopher Saldaña, will be released each month from September through May.

Don’t worry if you miss a month. All episodes are archived on the NEPC website and can be found here.

NEPC podcast episodes are also available on Apple PodcastsSpotify, and Stitcher, under the title NEPC Talks Education. Subscribe and follow!

The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), a university research center housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu

Copyright 2020 National Education Policy Center. All rights reserved.

July 24, 2020

Google Alert – “Michael Barbour”

I received this alert a couple of days, and it appears to be an archive of a podcast that I did with the MindShareLearn folks.

Google
“Michael Barbour”

As-it-happens update ⋅ July 23, 2020
WEB
Michael – Barbour Mixdown by MindShare Learning Report • A podcast on Anchor

Robert Martellacci and Michael Barbour go through a sneak peak of Michael’s new “State of the Nation: K-12 E-learning Canada” report.
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July 6, 2020

Silver Lining For Learning – Episode 13 | Remote Teaching and Home Learning: Examples from South Korea and Singapore

This podcast also came across my electronic desk late last week.

by Chris Dede | June 6, 2020

Nina Lim will share her personal experiences of distance teaching first grade students in California, United States from Seoul, South Korea. She will describe various forms of instruction used during the weeks of remote learning to show what this looked like for her elementary school students. She will share her thoughts on distance learning, describing the differences and similarities between remote instruction in United States and South Korea, including initiatives underway by the Ministry of Education in South Korea. Nina will also provide her personal insights as a teacher on how educational technology should develop in the near future.

Chee-Kit Looi will describe how, in Singapore, the actual practices of online learning at home during periods of lockdown bring us more awareness that inequality begins at home for online learning. However, the episodes of home-based learning also provide opportunities for us to think about resilience learning for our students. Chris Dede has shared several inspiring metaphors for viewing the silver lining in learning, for example, “It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness.” Chee-Kit likes to contribute one more metaphor, namely, “穷则变,变则通,通则久” – a saying from the Book of Changes from ancient Chinese history. This principle exhorts us to understand the way of change, to look for the turning point when things reach their extreme, and to facilitate change so as to effect their smooth and long-lasting development. Thus we can leverage on the inflection point now “to break the impasse, create the new normal, and sustain”, and not to “endure the impasse, keep anticipating, and wait to revert back to the old normal”!

More information about our guests below the video.

Our guests are:

Nina Lim, Stratford School, California, USA

Nina Lim is currently a Curriculum Designer and first grade teacher at Stratford School in Silicon Valley, California. She recently directed the distance learning program at her school by creating various online contents and training the teachers online. She recently collaborated with the Ministry of Education of Korea by providing recommendations on distance learning implementation of South Korea.

Nina also researches with Dr. Paul Kim at Stanford Graduate School of Education. Her research focuses on implementation of various higher-order thinking educational programs such as SMILE (Stanford Mobile Inquiry-based Learning Environment), HALO (STEAM-infused project), and 1001 Stories (global awareness & empowerment program). Nina has received her bachelor’s in Elementary Education from Vanderbilt University and then received her master’s in Human Development and Psychology at Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Chee-Kit Looi, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Chee-Kit Looi is Professor of Education at the National Institute of Education (NIE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore. He is also co-Director of the Centre for Research and Development in Learning (CRADLE) at NTU. In NIE, he teaches a pre-service course to teachers on how to use technology in the classrooms, as well as learning sciences courses to graduate students. In his research work on the use of technologies in local classrooms, one key finding is that more productive and sustained outcomes will come about if technologies are integrated into the curricular activities for a whole school year, on the circumstance of being used as a necessity (a new normal is created), rather than as an add-on (there is always a possibility to fall back to the old business-as-usual normal).

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