Virtual School Meanderings

September 30, 2019

NEPC’s September Education Interview Of The Month Features Discussion Of State Intervention In School District Finances

An item from the National Education Policy Center.

NEPC Education Interview of the Month is a great teaching resource; engaging drive-time listening; and 30 minutes of high-quality policy information for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Publication Announcement

NEPC’s September Education Interview of the Month Features Discussion of State Intervention in School District Finances

KEY TAKEAWAY:

NEPC Education Interview of the Month is a great teaching resource; engaging drive-time listening; and 30 minutes of high-quality policy information for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

CONTACT:

William J. Mathis:

(802) 383-0058

wmathis@sover.net

Christopher Saldaña:

(303) 492-2566

christopher.saldana@colorado.edu

TwitterEmail Address

BOULDER, CO (September 26, 2019) – In this month’s NEPC Education Interview of the Month, NEPC Researcher Christopher Saldaña speaks with Dirk Zuschlag, a former public school social studies teacher and practicing attorney, and a current PhD candidate in the education policy doctoral program at Michigan State University, and Kristine Bowman, the Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs at Michigan State University College of Education and a Professor of Law at Michigan State University College of Law. Together they discuss the recent rise in state intervention into school district’s finances. Zuschlag and Bowman examine this trend in detail in their NEPC research brief, States’ Interventions in School District’s Finances.

Chris, Dirk and Kristine discuss the ways in which states can justify intervention and how these justifications may vary across states. Zuschlag and Bowman argue that more research should examine these state interventions, given that they present significant implications for the power state governance systems hold over local public school districts. Zuschlag and Kristine also describe the creation of a brand new data set of 449 state statutory provisions that contain 1,068 individual potential interventions, which the authors believe will provide valuable insights for policymakers and researchers to contextualize and further understand the occurrence and consequences of state intervention.

Among Zuschlag and Bowman’s recommendations is a call for national organizations involved in educational policy to convene state policymakers and researchers to facilitate policy learning and policy transfer about these issues. The authors encourage state governors and/or state legislatures’ education committees to evaluate their systems of potential interventions into districts’ finances and also implementation. Finally, Zuschlag and Bowman call upon researchers to make use of the brief’s data to explore connections between a state’s articulated power over school districts’ finances and other core aspects of a state’s fiscal power over education, in order to further investigate the connections suggested in the brief between potential fiscal interventions, students’ race, and charter permissiveness.

A new NEPC Education Interview of the Month, hosted by NEPC Researcher Christopher Saldaña, will be released each month from September through May.

Don’t worry if you miss a month. All NEPC Education Interview of the Month podcasts are archived on the NEPC website and can be found here.

Coming Next Month

In October, Chris will be speaking with Katherine Schultz, Dean of the School of Education at the University of Colorado Boulder, about her new book, Distrust and Educational Change: Overcoming Barriers to Just and Lasting Educational Reform, which examines the way distrust and the failure to recognize and address it can significantly contribute to the failure of policies meant to improve educational systems.

Stay tuned in to NEPC for smart, engaging conversations about education policy.

The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), a university research center housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu

Copyright 2019 National Education Policy Center. All rights reserved.

September 17, 2019

Google Alert – “Michael Barbour”

I received this Google alert yesterday.

Google
“Michael Barbour”

As-it-happens update ⋅ September 16, 2019
WEB
Michael Barbour – Online Learning in Ontario

Michael K. Barbour is Associate Professor of Instructional Design for the College of Education…
Facebook Twitter

The item is actually something from a while ago, but since it popped up in my alerts again for some reason, I figured I should share it again.

Michael K. Barbour is Associate Professor of Instructional Design for the College of Education and Health Sciences at Touro University California. He has been involved with K-12 online learning in a variety of countries for well over a decade as a researcher, teacher, course designer and administrator.

Michael joins me to talk about the requirement that Ontario secondary school students take 4 of their high school credits online.

June 11, 2019

[REPOST] In Conversation with Stephen Hurley: Michael Barbour – Online Learning in Ontario

Originally posted at https://canelearn.net/in-conversation-with-stephen-hurley-michael-barbour-online-learning-in-ontario/

Earlier this week Stephen Hurley, as a part of his VoiceEd Radio show “In Conversation,” had a conversation with Michael Barbour about the recent developments in e-learning in Ontario – especially the mandate for students to take four e-learning courses in order to graduate from high school.

The session was described as:

Michael K. Barbour is Associate Professor of Instructional Design for the College of Education and Health Sciences at Touro University California. He has been involved with K-12 online learning in a variety of countries for well over a decade as a researcher, teacher, course designer and administrator.

Michael joins me to talk about the requirement that Ontario secondary school students take 4 of their high school credits online.

You can access the episode directly at:

https://www.spreaker.com/user/10100518/michael-barbour-online-learning-in-ontar

You can see all of the CANeLearn resources on this issue at:

https://canelearn.net/onmar15announcement/

Note that comments are closed on this entry. If you wish to discuss, please visit the original entry at https://canelearn.net/in-conversation-with-stephen-hurley-michael-barbour-online-learning-in-ontario/

June 8, 2019

Podcast: REL Southeast – Tracking Evidence

This scrolled through my Twitter stream late last week.

In this audio interview, Dr. Kathryn Kennedy, co-editor of the freely-available Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning, answers questions about connections between research, policy, and practice in the area of virtual education. This video was prepared by REL Southeast under a contract with the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Contract ED-IES-17-C-0011, administered by Florida State University. Its content does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of IES or the U.S. Department of Education nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

May 15, 2019

NEPC’s May Education Interview Of The Month Features A Discussion On Personalized Learning And The Digital Privatization Of Curriculum And Teaching

An item from the National Education Policy Center.

NEPC Education Interview of the Month is a great teaching resource; engaging drive-time listening; and 30 minutes of high-quality policy information for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Publication Announcement

KEY TAKEAWAY:

NEPC Education Interview of the Month is a great teaching resource; engaging drive-time listening; and 30 minutes of high-quality policy information for educators, community members, policymakers, and anyone interested in education.

CONTACT:

William J. Mathis:

(802) 383-0058

wmathis@sover.net

Faith Boninger:

(480) 390-6736

fboninger@gmail.com

TwitterEmail Address

BOULDER, CO (May 14, 2019) – In this month’s NEPC Education Interview of the Month, Lewis and Clark College Emeritus Professor of Education Gregory A. Smith speaks with Faith Boninger and Alex Molnar,of the University of Colorado Boulder, about personalized learning and digital privatization.

Boninger, Molnar, and Christopher Saldaña’s recent brief, Personalized Learning and the Digital Privatization of Curriculum and Teaching, explores the growing popularity of this technology-driven approach to teaching and learning. They point to the need for rigorous oversight of personalized learning programs.

Personalized learning programs relying on digital platforms collect student data and shift control away from local communities and teachers, putting curriculum and other educational decision-making into the hands of opaque algorithms created by unknown and unaccountable programmers. Boninger and Molnar explain that this shift also places student assessment “behind a veil that nobody can see or understand.”

To prevent personalized learning programs from harming students, Boninger and Molnar call for the external review and approval of curriculum materials by independent third-party education experts. States, they say, must establish an impartial government entity to review digital products intended for use in personalized learning programs. This entity would establish processes of review and approval, by third-party education experts, of all aspects of the programs used in schools.

The language used to promote personalized learning conjures up a misleading image that would have teachers believe that new digital technologies have transformed learning, but Boninger and Molnar point out that this is untrue.

The rationale for data being collected is to provide teachers with all the information necessary to help students follow “personalized learning paths.” Examination of products’ privacy policies, however, reveals little explanation of which data are collected, or with whom those data are shared. Boninger and Molnar recommend that states require all companies that produce products for personalized learning to be held to a detailed, transparent, and easy-to-read privacy policy.

Don’t worry if you miss a month. All NEPC Education Interview of the Month podcasts are archived on the NEPC website and can be found here.

This concludes our NEPC Education Interview of the Month series for the academic year. Please tune in next September for more smart, engaging conversations about education policy.

The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu

Copyright 2018 National Education Policy Center. All rights reserved.

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