Virtual School Meanderings

May 23, 2020

The Latest Evidence And Insights From Mathematica

A newsletter from another research center.

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Mathematica - Evidence & Insights

 A Mathematica Newsletter

May 21, 2020

COVID-19

Learn more about our evidence-based services, built on decades of experience, to help quickly scale response to the current crisis, guide responsible recovery for communities, and strengthen resilience to better meet evolving challenges.

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On the Blog

covid-19

In addition to providing meals, nutrition programs are an important social lifeline for older adults with lower income. With many congregate meal sites closed, some older Americans are struggling to maintain these connections. Policymakers should consider how to provide additional funding and flexibility so that the Nutrition Services Program can deliver on its goals.

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Child welfare agencies face a twofold dilemma. The visibility of at-risk children has been reduced, and children in foster care and those at home no longer have a social worker seeing them in person on a regular basis.

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On the Evidence Podcast

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This episode of On the Evidence focuses on life coaching, a youth violence reduction strategy that Mathematica is evaluating.

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Announcements

The COVID-19 Healthcare Data Users Group is an educational partnership between NAHDO and Mathematica. A webinar on May 27 will include a facilitated roundtable discussion featuring experts from varying expertise. A June 4 webinar will feature presentations by three experts who will share their experience using health data in light of the pandemic response.

Social Media Spotlight

Route Fifty @routefifty • May 8

State and local governments have had a lot of trouble ramping up traditional Covid-19 testing. Could testing wastewater help leaders figure out the extent of community spread? https://buff.ly/2A7oDGT

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Publications

Disability

Read more publications on Disability.

Employment

“Race Discrimination: An Economic Perspective.” Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Read more publications on Employment.

Family Support

“Evaluating a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program for Middle School Boys.” Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Read more publications on Family Support.

Health

Read more publications on Health.

Mathematica

ABOUT US

Mathematica applies expertise at the intersection of data, methods, policy, and practice to improve well-being around the world. We collaborate closely with public- and private-sector partners to translate big questions into deep insights that improve programs, refine strategies, and enhance understanding.

 

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May 9, 2020

The Latest Evidence And Insights From Mathematica!

A newsletter from a US-based research center.

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Mathematica - Evidence & Insights

 A Mathematica Newsletter

May 07 2020

Announcements

Elizabeth Warner was named a finalist for the Paul A. Volcker Career Achievement award, part of the Partnership for Public Service’s annual Service to America Medals (also known as the Sammies). Mathematica was honored to nominate Dr. Warner based on her decades of work with the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences, and we are thrilled that she was selected as a finalist. Learn more about her contributions to transforming the field of teacher training and meet the other Sammies finalists.

Out and About

The Milbank Memorial Fund talked with Julie Schilz about the impact of COVID-19 on primary care and how commercial insurers can help support vulnerable primary care practices.

Jill Berk joined Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Representative Bobby Scott (D-VA) for a virtual event organized by Third Way to discuss “COVID, COBRA, & COVERAGE: Health Care Amid the COVID-19 Crisis.”

On the Blog

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by Joe Baker and Amanda Lechner

While many of us try to cope with the immediate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and process the trauma, anxiety, and global loss, recent research might help guide the way forward.

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by Jill Spielfogel and Rivka Weiser

Child welfare agencies have an opportunity to keep more children safely within their own families, but they face complex challenges in implementing the changes set forth in Family First. Our new toolkit illuminates a path forward for child welfare agencies and provides concrete steps to make the process more manageable.

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Learning from home presents an opportunity to increase the connection between schools and families, which could help teachers employ innovative culturally responsive practices and address social and institutional barriers that contribute to disparities.

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On the Evidence Podcast

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For this episode of On the Evidence, Ralanda Nelson, who leads diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts at Mathematica, joins the podcast to discuss what it’s like to start a new job while sheltering in place; Nelson’s career path to her current role; and how the pandemic is spotlighting problems related to diversity, equity, and inclusion.

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Social Media Spotlight

Senator Dick Durbin  @SenatorDurbin • May 6

Yesterday, @BobbyScott & I spoke w/@ThirdWayTweet@MathematicaNow@FamiliesUSA@CenterOnBudget, & @BrookingsInst about our efforts to include funding in the next #COVID19 relief package to help laid off workers keep their health care plans through COBRA w/ no additional cost.

Mathematica

ABOUT US

Mathematica applies expertise at the intersection of data, methods, policy, and practice to improve well-being around the world. We collaborate closely with public- and private-sector partners to translate big questions into deep insights that improve programs, refine strategies, and enhance understanding.

 

Mathematica
P.O. Box 2393
Princeton, NJ 08543-2393

 

P: (609) 799-3535
F: (609) 799-0005

FOLLOW US

© 2020 Mathematica

November 14, 2015

New and Noteworthy from Mathematica

Note the K-12 online learning item about half way down…

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NOVEMBER 11, 2015

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EVENTS

American Evaluation Association and Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management presentations

Chicago Education Research Presentation Series

EMPLOYMENT

We are looking for asecurity program analyst.

Improving public well-being by conducting high quality, objective research and data collection.

©2015 Mathematica Policy Research
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Spotlight
Evidence-Based Standards for Mental Health InterventionsJonathan Brown, associate director of health research, discussed measure development and implementation for evidence-based mental health interventions with an Institute of Medicine committee. Read the white paper,“Strategies for Measuring the Quality of Psychotherapy,” co-authored by Mathematica and the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

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Experts Contribute to Child Obesity Policy Agenda

Senior fellows Ronette Briefel and Mary Kay Fox are members of anAmerican Academy of Pediatrics policy roundtable series on developing a comprehensive and actionable policy agenda for healthy weight from prenatal development through age 5. About the series.

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Online Charter Schools Struggle to Engage Students

Charter school artwork

A new report describes online charter schools that deliver instruction to students in their homes. The report uses surveys of principals to provide the first nationwide picture of how online charter schools operate. It finds that although these schools use innovative methods, they also have high student-teacher ratios, make substantial demands on parents, and typically provide students with only three to six hours of live instructional time per week. Fact sheet.

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Multimedia

 

Using Administrative Data to Improve Child WelfarePhoto of children sitting in a group

In this podcast, Ann Person, director of the Center for Improving Research Evidence (CIRE), and senior fellow Matthew Stagner explore trends in using administrative data to improve public child welfare programs, the focus of CIRE’s recent research forum.

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Blogs

Blog iconSenior researcher Yonatan Ben-Shalom discussed findings from the Stay-at-Work/Return-to-Work Policy Collaborative on The Hill’s Congress blog.

 

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Publications

EDUCATION

“Staffing a Low-Performing School: Behavioral Responses to Selective Teacher Transfer Incentives.” This article in Education Finance and Policy(subscription required) examines responses to a program that offers incentives for high-performing teachers to transfer into their district’s hardest-to-staff schools.

HEALTH

“Medicaid 1115 Demonstration Evaluation Design Plan.” This report lays out the general design and approach of a national, cross-state evaluation of four different types of Medicaid section 1115 demonstrations: (1) delivery system reform incentive payments, (2) premium assistance for Medicaid expansions, (3) beneficiary engagement/premium payments, and (4) managed long-term services and supports. Key features.

“Hospital Acquisition of Physician Groups: On the Road to Value-Based or Higher-Priced Care?” Over the past two decades, hospitals have acquired an increasing number of physician practices to improve revenue and market share and also prepare for payment reforms. However, this study in JAMA Internal Medicine (subscription required) examines a growing body of research showing that costs increase when hospitals employ physician practices. Challenges and costs. Related CHCE forum.

INTERNATIONAL

Photo of woman and children walking in Bihar, Incia“Midline Findings from the Evaluation of the Ananya Program in Bihar.” This report evaluates the impacts of a comprehensive package of interventions that aim to improve maternal and child health in Bihar, India, after two years of implementation. Learn about the findings.

“Evaluation of the Zanzibar Interconnector Activity: Findings from the Hotel Study.” This study, part of the evaluation of an energy sector project in Tanzania, examined how the installation of an electrical cable connecting Zanzibar’s Unguja Island influenced outcomes for hotels. Hotel study findings.

About Us: Mathematica, a nonpartisan research firm, conducts policy research and surveys for federal and state governments, foundations, and private-sector and international clients. Our mission is to improve public well-being by bringing the highest standards of quality, objectivity, and excellence to bear on the provision of information collection and analysis to our clients.

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October 27, 2015

Responses To CREDO’s Online Charter School Study 2015

As a follow-up to the entries on New National Study Details The Operations And Effects Of Online Charter Schools and CREDO – Online Charter School Study 2015, I have to say that I have found the immediate response kind of funny.

The first thing to remember is that CREDO has tended to publish pro-charter research, and that this particular study was funded by the Walton Foundation (who love all things school choice).

The second thing to remember is that researchers that have reviewed previous CREDO reports have had significant concerns with the research methodology that CREDO uses.  For example:

In most of their past research, CREDO has tended to find that charters are doing a good job using this questionable methodology.

Now in the current Online Charter School Study 2015 CREDO has found that there is little redeeming about student performance in online charter school.  So we all know what is going to happen – in fact, I’ve written about what was and is going to happen…

And of course, the predictable happened/is happening…

K12 Inc. Responds to Online Charter School Report / Analysis of Online Charter School Study by CREDO/Mathematica/CRPE

  • even though the study found that online charter schools enroll fewer disadvantaged students, but still claim that they do enroll more at-risk student (i.e., argue that the research is wrong)
  • raises same critiques about the methodology that organizations like the NEPC (linked above) have been raising for years
  • data is dated and the findings are different now, they have their own internal, non-reviewed, corporate reports to prove it

CREDO Study of Online Learning Gets an Incomplete

  • highlights the minor positive aspects of the report (even though the report is almost completely negative towards online charter schools)
  • raises same critiques about the methodology that organizations like the NEPC (linked above) have been raising for years
  • data is dated and the findings are different now,the for profit corporations (who have no vested interest in keeping the gravy train going) have their own internal, non-reviewed, corporate reports to prove it
  • co-opts the findings for a call for some of his own pet projects (i.e., things iNACOL wants that would open open the market to allow for more profiting and pillaging).

Response to CREDO at Stanford Report

Reaction to New Online Charter School Study

  • summarizes the findings,then complains about the fact that the study didn’t include their pet project (kind of like the journal reviewer that recommends rejection of your manuscript, and then outlines the study that they would have done if they were in your shoes)

Analyzing the CREDO Online Charter School Report: A Call for Improved Performance Metrics and Quality Assurance

  • summarizes the findings, then co-opts the results for a call for some of their own pet projects

Findings in Stanford Online School Study Have No Bearing on Blended Learning

  • summarizes the findings, then complains about the fact that the study didn’t include their pet project

National Alliance Responds to CREDO’s Virtual Charter Schools Report

  • ignore the evidence and argues that charter schools work, research from this same group (ignoring the flawed methodology that now even online charter advocates acknowledge) says so
  • we should close charter schools that don’t work (while at the same time fighting against any meaningful regulation or policy that would allow states to do this)
  • charter schools only serve a small number of students (but make big profits for the companies that do serve that small percentage)
  • finally, confound the issue by reminding us that the study didn’t include blended charter schools, and those are examples of online charter schools that do work

CER Responds to Online Charter School Report

  • even though the study found that online charter schools enroll fewer disadvantaged students, but still claim that they do enroll more at-risk student (i.e., argue that the research is wrong)
  • raises same critiques about the methodology that organizations like the NEPC (linked above) have been raising for years
  • changes the topic altogether (“Will someone please things about the children!”)

Shouldn’t surprise anyone…

CREDO – Online Charter School Study 2015

A couple of hours ago I posted New National Study Details The Operations And Effects Of Online Charter Schools.  Here are some more details on the report.

The actual report:

The press releases:

Early media:

More in an hour or two…

 

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