Virtual School Meanderings

January 29, 2016

Attention Authors: Get More Citations to Your Work

From Monday’s inbox…  Good advice for all scholars!!!

Online Learning Consortium  
Help us Spread the Word about OLJ!
Dear Michael,

The editors of OLJ would like to encourage you to promote your article on other research sites. This is perfectly appropriate given that OLJ is an open access journal.

More citations are good for you, the author, as it builds your credibility and name-recognition in the field and certainly helps when you go up for tenure and/or promotion. OLJ benefits, too, as the more your article is cited, the more the journal is recognized as a source of quality research among researchers and practitioners. So we both benefit when your article is widely cited.

Here are some options for promoting your article for you to consider:

If doing this intrigues you and you’d like to learn more about these systems, here is an article that compares ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and other sites: Academic Networks Contest: ResearchGate v Academia.edu.

And here is some research that compares articles in Academia.edu to articles not available online: Open Access Meets Discoverability: Citations to Articles Posted to Academia.edu.

A paper uploaded to Academia.edu has 41% more citations after one year, 50% more after three years, and 73% more after five years.

One last tip – please also consider creating an account on Google Scholar. You can use this site to monitor citations to your research.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katrina Meyers, Associate Editor, Online Learning
Dr. Peter Shea, Editor, Online Learning

P.S. We will also be scheduling a webinar on this topic in the months ahead – stay tuned for more details!

View as Webpage

The Online Learning Consortium | P.O. Box 1238 | Newburyport | MA | 01950

January 1, 2016

Article Notice: Book Review: Online, Blended, and Distance Education – Building Successful Programs in Schools (Online Learning)

As I mentioned on Monday, I’m posting notice of the articles from the Online Learning 19:5 K-12 Online Learning Research Special Issue.

Book Review: Online, Blended, and Distance Education: Building Successful Programs in Schools

Anne Roycroft, EdD
Fuel Education

Editors: Tom Clark and Michael Barbour. (2015). Online, Blended, and Distance Education: Building Successful Programs in Schools. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing. 239 pages. ISBN: 978-1-62036-163-4 (cloth)

December 31, 2015

Article Notice: Book Review – Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning (Online Learning)

As I mentioned on Monday, I’m posting notice of the articles from the Online Learning 19:5 K-12 Online Learning Research Special Issue.

Book Review: Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning

Diane Mayse,PhD
Blended Learning Data Manager (Nexus Academies)
Connections Education

Editors: Richard E. Ferdig and Kathryn Kennedy (2014). Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning. Pages: 540. Published by ETC Press. ISBN: 978-1-312-58708-3. The online version is available for no charge at http://press.etc.cmu.edu/content/handbook-research-k-12-online-and-blendedlearning-0. The printed version is $33.95.

Article Notice: Parent and Student Perceptions of Parent Engagement at a Cyber Charter High School (Online Learning)

As I mentioned on Monday, I’m posting notice of the articles from the Online Learning 19:5 K-12 Online Learning Research Special Issue.

Parent and Student Perceptions of Parent Engagement at a Cyber Charter High School

Jered Borup and Mark A. Stevens
George Mason University

Lisa Hasler Waters
Flint Hill School, VA

Abstract – As enrollments in cyber charter schools grow, it becomes increasingly important to understand how parents engage in their students’ learning. Researchers have hypothesized that parental engagement is even more critical when online students learn from home, but few researchers have examined parents’ engagement behavior—especially parents of adolescent learners. In this case study we addressed this gap using parent and student interviews at a full-time online charter school. Our analysis of 19 interviews with 9 parents and 10 interviews with 10 students identified five primary types of parental engagement within this setting: (1) nurturing relationships and interactions, (2) advising and mentoring, (3) organizing, (4) monitoring and motivating student engagement, and (5) instructing. We also identified obstacles to effective parental engagement, and in this paper we discuss how programs can work with parents to foster more collaborative relationships.

December 30, 2015

Article Notice: Real-Time Virtual Teaching – Lessons Learned From a Case Study in a Rural School (Online Learning)

As I mentioned on Monday, I’m posting notice of the articles from the Online Learning 19:5 K-12 Online Learning Research Special Issue.

Real-Time Virtual Teaching: Lessons Learned From a Case Study in a Rural School

Michael K. Barbour
Sacred Heart University

Abstract – Due to the challenges facing rural schools, many jurisdictions have had resorted to the use virtual school programs to provide curricular opportunities to their students. While the number of virtual schools that rely on synchronous instruction as a primary or significant method of delivery is quite small, there are some programs that do (and a growing number of virtual schools that use it with small group or individuals). This case study examined the use of synchronous online instruction by one virtual school with students in a single rural school in Newfoundland and Labrador. The data from a variety of collection methods revealed three themes: similarities with how online student experiences and the traditional classroom, the development of local learning communities, and the preference for students to use chat over audio.

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