Virtual School Meanderings

April 6, 2021

Join REL Midwest on April 14 for our webinar “Evidence-Based Literacy Interventions to Support Young Learners During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic”

This webinar may be of interest to some readers.

To view this email as a web page, go here.
REL MIDWEST Regional Educational Laboratory at American Institutes for Research
Evidence-Based Literacy Interventions to Support Young Learners During and After The COVID-19 Pandemic
Calendar icon
  April 14, 2021
Clock icon
3:00 p.m. CT
REGISTER HERE

You’re invited to an upcoming Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest webinar on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, from 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Central Time. This webinar will provide early childhood (preK–grade 3) educators with effective strategies to help students develop reading skills efficiently during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.
Dr. Nell K. Duke (University of Michigan) and Dr. Laura Justice (Ohio State University) will share evidence-based literacy practices that educators can incorporate into their Tier I, Tier II, and Tier III classroom literacy instruction. Dr. Laurie Lee from REL Southeast will provide an overview of REL Southeast’s teacher and parent resources for supporting children’s reading at home. Finally, practitioners Shelia Boozer and Debbie Thomas from Springfield Public Schools will present several strategies they will use to support early literacy instruction during the 2021/22 school year.
To register for the event, click on the link below. Please also share this link with others who you think would benefit from learning more about this topic.

https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/midwest/events/2021/april-14.aspx

Sincerely,
REL Midwest
This e-mail was sent to: mkbarbour@gmail.com

This e-mail was sent by: American Institutes for Research
1400 Crystal Drive, 10th Floor Arlington, VA 22202-3289 USA

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April 5, 2021

Stephen’s Web ~ OLDaily – April 02, 2021: The state of school education one year into the COVID pandemic

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 12:06 pm
Tags: , , , , , , ,

This item from Stephen Downes late last week is well worth a look.

The state of school education one year into the COVID pandemic

Andreas Schleicheret.al.OECD, Apr 02, 2021

IconThis comprehensive report (51 page PDF) looks at how countries adapted their education systems to the Covid pandemic. It’s too early to tell how they fared, but this report serves as a baseline that will help researchers in the future map adaptations to post-Covid educational outcomes. It’s worth noting – and the report does note this – that countries with the poorest PISA scores were also the countries that fully closed their schools the longest. This wasn’t related to infection rates, but rather, was related to economic conditions. I would also look in post-Covid analysis for any correlation between internet availability and success rates, though the study doesn’t draw this comparison explicitly.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

March 30, 2021

CDC Study: Association of Children’s Mode of School Instruction with Child and Parent Experiences and Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic — COVID Experiences Survey, United States, October 8–November 13, 2020

I haven’t had the chance to read through this carefully yet,but I wanted to pass it along to readers.

Association of Children’s Mode of School Instruction with Child and Parent Experiences and Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic — COVID Experiences Survey, United States, October 8–November 13, 2020

Jorge V. Verlenden, PhD1,2; Sanjana Pampati, MPH1,3; Catherine N. Rasberry, PhD1,2; Nicole Liddon, PhD1; Marci Hertz, MS1,2; Greta Kilmer, MS1; Melissa Heim Viox, MPH4; Sarah Lee, PhD2,5; Neha K. Cramer, MPH2,5; Lisa C. Barrios, DrPH1,2; Kathleen A. Ethier, PhD1

Summary

What is already known about the topic?

COVID-19–associated schooling changes present stressors to children and parents that might increase risks to mental health and well-being.

What is added by this report?

In a probability-based survey of parents of children aged 5–12 years, 45.7% reported that their children received virtual instruction only, 30.9% in-person only, and 23.4% combined virtual and in-person instruction. Findings suggest that virtual instruction might present more risks than does in-person instruction related to child and parental mental and emotional health and some health-supporting behaviors.

What are the implications for public health practice?

Children not receiving full-time, in-person instruction and their parents might need additional supports to mitigate pandemic impacts.

March 24, 2021

Join REL Midwest on April 14 for our webinar “Evidence-Based Literacy Interventions to Support Young Learners During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic”

The first of three REL/IES webinars/items that may be of interest to readers.

To view this email as a web page, go here.
REL MIDWEST Regional Educational Laboratory at American Institutes for Research
Join REL Midwest on April 14 for our webinar “Evidence-Based Literacy Interventions to Support Young Learners During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic”
Calendar icon
  April 14, 2021
Clock icon
3:00 p.m. CT
REGISTER HERE

You’re invited to an upcoming Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest webinar on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, at 3:00 p.m. Central Time. This webinar will provide early childhood practitioners (preK–grade 3) with effective strategies to help students develop reading skills efficiently during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.
Dr. Nell K. Duke (University of Michigan) and Dr. Laura Justice (Ohio State University) will share evidence-based literacy practices that educators can incorporate into their Tier I, Tier II, and Tier III classroom literacy instruction. Dr. Laurie Lee from REL Southeast will provide an overview of REL Southeast’s teacher and parent resources for supporting children’s reading at home. Finally, practitioners Shelia Boozer and Debbie Thomas from Springfield Public Schools will describe instructional strategies their district currently uses to support early literacy instruction as well as strategies they plan to use during the 2021/22 school year.
To register for the event, please click on the link below. Please also share this link with others whom you think would benefit from learning more about this topic.

https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/midwest/events/2021/april-14.aspx

Sincerely,
REL Midwest
This e-mail was sent to: mkbarbour@gmail.com

This e-mail was sent by: American Institutes for Research
1400 Crystal Drive, 10th Floor Arlington, VA 22202-3289 USA

March 13, 2021

ChalkBeat Special

Filed under: virtual school — Michael K. Barbour @ 11:09 am
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Here are a couple of items from ChalkBeat that I thought were relevant to readers.  The first…

Special Report: One year into the COVID-19 pandemic, school as we know it has been transformed.

March 8, 2021
Kindergarten students line up with their arms stretched out in front of them to maintain social distance with their peers, inside a classroom at Stark Elementary School on October 21, 2020 in Stamford, Connecticut.

On the first anniversary of a cascade of nationwide school shutdowns, Chalkbeat is looking back on this toughest of years in education through those who experienced it firsthand: educators, counselors, students, parents. Some of them will be familiar to our readers, compelling figures we met early in the pandemic who we wanted to revisit. Others we have met since and felt their stories powerfully spoke to this remarkable year.

School during the pandemic looks different for every district, every school, every family. For some there are plexiglass dividers and face shields; for others, Zoom and Google Classroom. Where one teacher eagerly attends class in person, another is filled with fear. The random testing, the grading systems, the hybrid schedules vary wildly. But one thing unites them all — school as we know it has been completely transformed.

Read the first piece in the series by Carrie Melago, managing editor for local news.

 


 

Avon High School students performed the musical “Bright Star” wearing face shields and masks.

In the suburbs of Indianapolis, the Avon district is trying to have as normal a year as possible in the midst of a pandemic — but it comes with the challenge of students and teachers spending weeks, sometimes adding up to months, out of school for quarantines as a cautionary measure to prevent the spread of the virus.

Since throwing its doors back open in late July for full-time in-person learning, complete with extracurriculars, the Avon district has reported more than 600 cases of COVID-19 among the roughly 10,000 students and staff who returned. Thousands of students and staff have been ordered home to isolate, peaking at more than 850 people quarantined one week in January.

“That’s been the part that has been the most exhausting,” said Avon Superintendent Scott Wyndham, “is the constant rotation of quarantines, and how to help students stay up with their coursework so that they’re not behind when they come back.”

While students say they’re thankful to be back, they’re also on edge. They describe the year as messy, chaotic, and uncertain, wondering every day whether they’ll have school and activities taken away from them.

“We just don’t want to get our hopes up,” Alexa said, “to just get disappointed.”

Read the story from Chalkbeat Indiana bureau chief Stephanie Wang.

And follow along this week as we publish more snapshots of your schools across the country, one year into the COVID-19 pandemic.

Photos: John Moore / Getty Images; courtesy of the Margolius family

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The second…

Freshman year, at a distance: Finding courage in the chat

March 9, 2021
A photograph of Casandra Sotelo-Rivera’s computer, which she uses for remote learning at Dr. Martin Luther King Early College in Denver, Colo.

When we introduced you to her last fall, Casandra Sotelo-Rivera was starting to find her voice as a high school freshman. Shy and studious, Casandra found her comfort level in remote school and even took a chance coming out of her shell through a photography assignment.

A few things have changed since then. The coronavirus has loosened its grip on our lives after exacting a terrible toll, and more schools across the U.S. are offering in-person learning.

That includes high schools, which generally have been the last to reopen because of the increased risk of transmission among older students and the challenges of creating manageable cohorts. It includes Casandra’s school, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Early College in Denver.

Casandra remains at home, behind her computer screen, like the majority of high school students in Colorado’s largest school district.

In catching up with Casandra this semester and speaking with her teachers, reporter Melanie Asmar found an interesting window into the online freshman year experience in a pandemic.

The virtual classrooms are often quiet, as few students unmute to answer questions. But the chat box is full of comments and conversation. This, as it turns out, is one reason Casandra is thriving online and wants to remain there. One of her teachers told Melanie she considers Casandra one of her most outgoing students “because she was answering everything.”

You can read more about how Casandra is doing here in the latest installment of our ongoing series documenting the high school experience in this most unorthodox of years.

Look for updates on other students we’ve featured in the series — and a story about a student you haven’t met yet — soon.

Thanks for reading Chalkbeat!

— Eric Gorski, managing editor for local news

 

Photo courtesy of Casandra Sotelo-Rivera

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