Virtual School Meanderings

January 18, 2022

Q&A webinar: How learning continued during the COVID-19 pandemic: Global lessons from initiatives to support learners and teachers

This webinar may be of interest to readers.

Register for the webinar on 24 January View this email online

Join us on Monday 24 January at 15:00 (Paris time)

How learning continued during the COVID-19 pandemic

Global lessons from initiatives to support learners and teachers

Q&A WEBINAR

OECD EDUCATION AND SKILLS WEBINAR SERIES

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About this webinar

School closures became common around the world during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Faced with the task of keeping learning going without school facilities, educators and governments quickly adapted and many innovations emerged. The OECD, the World Bank, Harvard’s Global Education Innovation Initiative and HundrED have documented a range of examples of these efforts from the first wave of school closures, looking at low-, middle- and high-income countries on all continents and drawing some lessons from these fast-paced responses to reimagine a post-pandemic version of education.

Join us as we launch a new report that outlines 45 of these education continuity stories and discuss how such initiatives can contribute to the current pandemic situation and the overall development of education worldwide.

Speakers include:

  • Andreas Schleicher, OECD Director for Education and Skills
  • Jaime Saavedra, Global Director for Education, World Bank
  • Fernando Reimers, Professor of Practice in International Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Saku Tuominen, Education innovation specialist and Founder, HundrED

Register for the webinar on
24 January, 15:00 (Paris time)

Register
OECD © 2022, All rights reserved.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
2 rue André-Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16, France

January 11, 2022

Q&A webinar: COVID, technology and climate change: How are societal trends shaping the future of education?

This webinar may be of interest to readers of this space.

Register for the webinar on 18 January View this email online

Join us on Tuesday 18 January at 16:00 (Paris time)

COVID, technology and climate change

How are societal trends shaping the future of education?

Q&A WEBINAR

OECD EDUCATION AND SKILLS WEBINAR SERIES

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Follow us on YouTube
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About this webinar

Our world is witnessing a growing disconnect between the economic growth imperative and our planet’s finite resources; between what is technologically possible and existing social needs. As the world continues to change, education must adapt to support all individuals in becoming competent, caring and responsible citizens.

Analysing education in the context of major economic, political, social and technological trends is a way to bring the future into the present and examine the different possible scenarios, giving us a better chance to be ready for whatever scenario might arrive. It is a way to ask ourselves: What do global trends mean for the future of my education system? And what can education do to influence these global trends?”

Join Andreas Schleicher, OECD Director for Education and Skills, for an interactive webinar to discuss these and other questions as we launch the 2022 edition of the OECD Trends Shaping Education report. You will have the chance to hear insights from education experts, and to tell us about the future you envision for education.

Speakers include:

  • Andreas Schleicher, OECD Director for Education and Skills
  • Saul Perlmutter, Nobel laureate and Professor of Physics, UC Berkeley
  • Alexandra Seybal, Student representative, Organsing Bureau of European School Student Unions
  • Saku Tuominen, Education innovation specialist and Founder of HundrED

Moderated by Tia Loukkola, Head of the Innovation and Measuring Progress Division, OECD Directorate for Education and Skills

Register for the webinar on
18 January, 16:00 (Paris time)

Register
OECD © 2022, All rights reserved.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
2 rue André-Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16, France

January 10, 2022

Article Notice – Global emergency remote education in secondary schools during the COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review

This article scrolled through the dashboard of one of my open scholarship networks and I felt it was relevant enough that I should pass it along to readers of this space.

  • October 2021
  • Affiliation: University College London
  • Melissa Bond
  • Nina Bergdahl
  • Rosa Maria Mendizabal
  • Dylan Kneale
  • Faye Bolan
  • Poppy Hull
  • Fjolla Ramadani

Description – Further information available here: https://eppi.ioe.ac.uk/cms/Default.aspx?tabid=3831 The worldwide shift to emergency remote education in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic impacted billions of students and teachers. A range of teaching and learning strategies were employed by schools as a result, despite confusing and sometimes contradictory government guidance, with systemic issues such as equity and access impacting heavily on disadvantaged students. In light of the findings of a recent IPPO evidence snapshot and roundtable event, and in order to gain further insight into how emergency remote education was experienced by secondary school students, parents and educators, a systematic review was conducted that collates and synthesises primary empirical studies across five key research questions focusing on student engagement, online assessment, peer collaboration, parent engagement, and future directions for online learning. Studies were searched for in May 2021 using Web of Science, Scopus, ERIC, Microsoft Academic Graph, ResearchGate and the COVID-19 living map, and were included if they focused on teaching and learning using blended or online approaches in secondary schools during the pandemic, that were published in English. Following quality assessment on scope and methodological rigour, 81 studies were included for narrative synthesis. The research studies were conducted in 38 countries, with 37% of studies from low or lower-middle income countries, and 63% from upper-middle income or high-income countries. Most of the evidence came from students (64%), followed by teachers (53%), with very few studies exploring the perceptions and experiences of parents (6%) or school leaders (5%). Findings reveal that self-regulation and understanding were the most frequently reported indicators of student engagement, with online assessment tools, learning management systems with collaborative tools, live synchronous lessons with peer and teacher interaction, and teacher-made videos considered particularly engaging. Social isolation was the most frequently reported indicator of disengagement, characterised by poor attendance in live lessons, a lack of opportunities to seek help with challenges and difficulties facilitating peer collaboration. Although many articles reported that assessment online was particularly challenging, 21 different types of online assessments strategies were identified, with online quizzes and formative online feedback the most frequently used. Live marking or recorded feedback and assessment were found to be particularly beneficial, as providing feedback during live lessons was sometimes challenging. Peer collaboration was facilitated through peer assessment, inquiry-based group work and experiments, aided by the use of collaborative software and combining multiple applications. Parental involvement and support contributed to student learning, although issues of equity impacted the extent to which they could engage with their children’s learning, alongside gaps in family content knowledge and technological skills. Numerous implications for future policy relating to online and blended learning are provided.

Note in particular the link to the larger project, which has a couple of other relevant items.

January 8, 2022

Tony Bates in the OLDaily

Over the past couple of days, there have been a couple of items related to Tony Bates – a scholar of online learning in Canada – posted in Stephen Downes’ OLDaily.  Both items have had some or a complete focus on the K-12 setting, so I wanted to pass them along to reader of this space.

Successful competency-based learning in a California school system

Tony BatesOnline learning and distance education resources, Jan 05, 2022

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Tony Bates summarizes this article from the Hechinger Report on competency-based learning in a California school district. There’s some discussion about the planning and personalization, and then this: “Almost 90 percent of the district’s students and their families have access to free internet at home, as a result of the city providing free community Wi-fi.” Bates comments, “I was also interested to learn that this model worked best for younger and more disadvantaged students during the pandemic, compared with comparable school systems who moved more traditional classes online.” A lesson, maybe, for Ontario?

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

Groundhog day in online learning? What’s different this time

Tony BatesOnline learning and distance education resources, Jan 07, 2022

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Tony Bates says what I said, but much more diplomatically: “Government action regarding improving Internet access though is still terribly slow here in Canada. Much more urgency is required. Even more concerning appears to be the lack of learning in the k-12 system, especially by administrators, about the best way to provide online learning for school children. Apparently some are still requiring students to spend up to six hours a day on Zoom calls… After nearly two years, this failure to adapt teaching methods to what is appropriate for online learning in school systems is becoming inexcusable.”

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

Be sure to check out both entries.

December 13, 2021

Thank You for Contributing to the Conversation – Help us Improve

Last week I was able to attend a part of this session, but wanted to share the resources that came afterwards because I thought several of them might be useful (note that I did remove the survey link).

Dear participants,

Thank you once again for taking part in our Live Conversation:  How Will We Teach In a (Post) Pandemic Canada earlier this week.

If you have not already done so, we encourage you to complete a brief survey here by Wednesday, December 15th to share with us what you would like to see in our future virtual gatherings, as well as how we can improve. Your responses will be anonymous. We thank you in advance for your valuable feedback!

As a reminder, the session was recorded; if you do not wish to be shown in the highlights package, please reply to this email or contact communication@edcan.ca.

Don’t forget to sign up to stay up to date on all the latest editions of Education Canada, powered by voicEd Radio, including future virtual gatherings.

Here are some additional resources shared by the speakers or mentioned during the session:

 

You can also find the speakers on Twitter:
Valerie Irvine: @_valeriei
Nick Bertrand: @NickBertrand9

Kristina Llewellyn: @krllewellyn


Sincerely,
Shanice
From the EdCan Network

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