Virtual School Meanderings

April 17, 2018

AERA18 Insider – Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Today is the final day of AERA.

AERA18 Insider
Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Welcome to the final day of the 2018 AERA Annual Meeting! Each morning, AERA18 Insider will provide tips on key sessions and events, as well as other Annual Meeting resources and highlights you won’t want to miss.

Join the conversation: Use the conference hashtag #AERA18, and follow AERA on Twitter at@AERA_EdResearch.

Questions? Contact the AERA Meetings team at annualmtg@aera.net, or check out the Navigating the Annual Meeting section of the program for answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

In this Issue:

The Role of Education Researchers in an Era of Fake News


AERA Open Business Meeting


The State of School Climate Studies: The Context of the Americas


Education for Citizenship in Latin America: Common Paths and Challenges


Save the Date! ~ Toronto 2019


Download the Annual Meeting App


Resources


2018 Annual Meeting Sponsors

AERA would like to extend a special thank you to our 2018 sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor
– American Institutes for Research

Gold Sponsor
– SAGE Publishing

Silver Sponsors
– GTCOM
– Mathematica

Bronze Sponsors
– AccessLex Institute
– National Institute of Education
– RAND Corporation





Today’s Highlights

The Role of Education Researchers in an Era of Fake News

8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Beekman
Link to session
Session will also be live-streamed: Register here

In recent times, we have witnessed challenges by federal, state, and local elected officials to the fundamental principles and values of higher education in the United States. Particularly troubling are the disregard and politicization of facts, data, research, and science and mischaracterizations of the meaning and importance of academic freedom. This presidential session seeks to advance productive and interactive dialogue about how we, as individuals and a collective, can ensure the integrity of knowledge now and into the future and effectively respond to challenges to facts, data, research, and science. Dialogue will focus on the role of individual education researchers and AERA in the production, dissemination, and use of research.

The session will be chaired by Laura W. Perna (University of Pennsylvania). Participants include Prudence L. Carter, (University of California, Berkeley), Kris Gutierrez (University of California, Berkeley), Jeffrey R. Henig (Teachers College, Columbia University), William F. Tate (Washington University in St. Louis), William G. Tierney (University of Southern California), Ana M. Martínez-Alemán (Boston College), Demetri L. Morgan (Loyola University Chicago), and Antar Akari Tichavakunda (University of Southern California).

Read brief papers by the presenters here.

AERA Open Business Meeting

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Sheraton New York Times Square, Third Floor, New York Ballroom West
Link to session

The AERA Open Business Meeting provides a time for AERA members to discuss important issues regarding education research and the work of AERA. Members are encouraged to attend this meeting convened by AERA President Deborah Loewenberg Ball (University of Michigan), AERA President-Elect  Amy Stuart Wells (Teachers College, Columbia University), AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine.

The State of School Climate Studies: The Context of the Americas

8:15 a.m. to 9:35 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room East
Link to session

Research on school climate has become increasingly popular internationally.  Important variables in a theory of action for school climate include teacher-pupil relationships, school connectedness, and school violence. These papers represent researchers from within the Americas who have collaborated to initiate school climate studies as part of the thrust towards improving schools. Given their varied experiences, they bring a multi-cultural research perspective. This symposium assesses this body of work and considers its importance and possible impact for wider application across the Americas while analyzing the weaknesses and limitations of current approaches and measures. The session will be chaired by Sylvia Maureen Henry (University of the West Indies).

Education for Citizenship in Latin America: Common Paths and Challenges

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room West
Link to session

Given the emergence of new social and educational challenges, such as globalization, the information society, immigration, or political apathy, the need has arisen to rethink the role of schools and universities in the education of citizens. This symposium seeks to discuss emerging challenges in youth education and in changing contexts of democracy and civil participation in Latin America, particularly in Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, and Chile. The session will be chaired by Carmen Zuniga (Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile); Alejandro Carrasco (Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile) will serve as the discussant.

Save the Date!
2019 AERA Annual Meeting
Friday, April 5 –  Tuesday, April 9
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Photograph by Christian Raul Hernandez. Used with permission under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

 

2018 Annual Meeting Page | Theme | Registration | Visiting NYC |
Meeting Services | Housing & Travel | Exhibits, Sponsors, Advertising | Contact AERA
2018 Annual Meeting
“The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education”
Friday, April 13 – Tuesday, April 17, 2018
New York City, NY


This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com. You are receiving this email because of your association with AERA. Click the following link to change your preference or opt out of AERA emails: preferences

American Educational Research Association
1430 K Street, NW, Suite 1200
Washington, DC 20005
www.aera.net

April 16, 2018

AERA18 Insider – Monday, April 16, 2018

And today’s update from AERA…

AERA18 Insider
Monday, April 16, 2018

Welcome to day four of the 2018 AERA Annual Meeting! Each morning, AERA18 Insider will provide tips on key sessions and events, as well as other Annual Meeting resources and highlights you won’t want to miss.

Join the conversation: Use the conference hastag #AERA18, and follow AERA on Twitter at@AERA_EdResearch.

Questions? Contact the AERA Meetings team at annualmtg@aera.net, or check out the Navigating the Annual Meeting section of the program for answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

In this Issue:

School Segregation, Desegregation, Resegregation, and Integration: Documenting and Troubling a Dream DeferredAdvocating for the Right to Science and Evidence-Based Policy Making in Education: Lessons from the March for Science MovementAERA Distinguished Public Service Award (2017) Lecture: Michael W. KirstRevisiting the IES/NSF Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development After Five Years (2013-2018)Ocean Hill–Brownsville and Its Relevance Today: The 50th Anniversary of New York City’s Movement for Community ControlThe Rise of Nonprofit Education Journalism and What It Means for Education ResearchersAdvancing and Benefiting from Education Research in Confrontational and Tumultuous TimesReinventing 21st Century Graduate Education for Education Research and All Science FieldsReimagining Education for the Changing Public: From Research to Promising Pedagogy in Racially Diverse SchoolsComing on Tuesday: The Role of Education Researchers in an Era of Fake NewsExhibit Hall and Speaker’s CornerToday’s Live-Streaming SessionsDownload the Annual Meeting App

Resources

2018 Annual Meeting Sponsors

AERA would like to extend a special thank you to our 2018 sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor
– American Institutes for Research

Gold Sponsor
– SAGE Publishing

Silver Sponsors
– GTCOM
– Mathematica

Bronze Sponsors
– AccessLex Institute
– National Institute of Education
– RAND Corporation

Today’s Highlights

School Segregation, Desegregation, Resegregation, and Integration: Documenting and Troubling a Dream Deferred

8:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Link to session

Sixty-four years post the Brown vs. Board of Educationdecision, racially integrated schools remain an elusive dream. This session interrogates the elusiveness and assumptions of this dream by documenting and troubling the persistence, evolution, and effects of school segregation as well as the prospect, character, and (un)realized promises of integrated schools. The session will be chaired by Amy Stuart Wells (Teachers College, Columbia University) and Mitchell J. Chang, (University of California, Los Angeles). Presenters include Amy Stuart Wells, Gary A. Orfield (University of California, Los Angeles), John B. Diamond (University of Wisconsin, Madison), Amanda E. Lewis (University of Illinois at Chicago), and Russell W. Rumberger (University of California, Santa Barbara).

Advocating for the Right to Science and Evidence-Based Policy Making in Education: Lessons from the March for Science Movement

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Madison
Link to session

The session will be chaired by Lori Diane Hill (AERA); participants include Gustavo E. Fischman (Arizona State University), Diana E. Hess (University of Wisconsin, Madison), Andrew Rosenberg (Center for Science and Democracy), and Caroline Weinberg (March for Science).

AERA Distinguished Public Service Award (2017) Lecture: Michael W. Kirst

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Session hashtag: #AERAServe
Link to session

Michael W. Kirst (Stanford University) will deliver the AERA Distinguished Public Service Award Lecture, “Public Policy Impact of Education Research: A 54-Year Career Perspective.” The session will be chaired by Kent McGuire (The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation).

Revisiting the IES/NSF Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development After Five Years (2013-2018)

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room West
Link to session

The Institute of Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation released the Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development in August of 2013. Five years later, this panel of federal agency representatives and education researchers reflect on the Guidelines, their usefulness for the field of education research, relative areas of importance, and potential areas for improvement or revision in light of the current landscape of education research.The session will be chaired by Sarah-Kay McDonald (National Science Foundation) and Joan McLaughlin (National Center for Special Education/Institute of Education Sciences).Participants include Larry V. Hedges (Northwestern University) and
Rebecca A. Maynard (University of Pennsylvania).

Ocean Hill–Brownsville and Its Relevance Today: The 50th Anniversary of New York City’s Movement for Community Control

10:35 a.m. to 1:55 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Grand Ballroom Suite-West Ballroom
Link to session

Through film, performance, and dialogue, this session will explore the historical significance of New York City’s community control movement in Harlem, East Harlem, Ocean-Hill Brownville, Bedford Stuyvesant, the Lower East Side, and the South Bronx in the 1960s. Scholars and community activists from the past and present will explore the long arc of intersectionality in New York City’s grassroots organizing for educational equity and justice and the city, union, and school system responses. Interwoven throughout will be stories from the classroom, school, district, and neighborhoods touched by the community control movement and their relevance to organizing today. The session will be chaired by Stephen Brier (The Graduate Center, City University of New York) and  Heather Lewis (Pratt Institute).

The Rise of Nonprofit Education Journalism and What It Means for Education Researchers

12:25 p.m.to 1:55 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Link to session

As the news media industry has undergone profound change, a positive development amid the disruption has been the growth in philanthropy-supported news outlets, including those that specialize in education coverage. This session will focus on how these news providers differ from traditional outlets in their coverage of education and education research and data; and how they complement, supplement, and influence news coverage nationally and locally. Panelists will also discuss the new opportunities that these outlets provide education researchers and best practices for scholars who want to communicate their work through media coverage. Participants include Matt Barnum (Chalkbeat), Sarah Carr (The Teacher Project), Sarah Garland (The Hechinger Report), chair Sarah Dockery Sparks (Education Week), and commentator Jeffrey R. Heing (Teachers College, Columbia University).

Advancing and Benefiting from Education Research in Confrontational and Tumultuous Times

2:15 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton North
Link to session

What are the implications for education research as a field to navigate a world where our mission and purpose may be contested rather than embraced? The session will start by having each participant briefly reflect on the topic and speak to the question of what we (individually and organizationally) can do with our skills, knowledge, and expertise to ensure that our work moves forward and matters. We will follow up with cross-talk among the panelists and encourage audience questions and participation. The session will be chaired by Vivian L. Gadsden (University of Pennsylvania) and Felice J. Levine (AERA). Participants include Deborah Loewenberg Ball (University of Michigan), James A. Banks (University of Washington, Seattle), Joyce E. King (Georgia State University), William F. Tate (Washington University in St. Louis), and William G. Tierney (University of Southern California).

Reinventing 21st Century Graduate Education for Education Research and All Science Fields

2:15 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room West
Co-sponsor: Consortium of University and Research Institutions (CURI)
Link to session

The session will be chaired by Susan Fuhrman (Teachers College, Columbia University). Participants include Julia Kent (Council of Graduate Schools), Layne Scherer (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine), and Amy Stephens (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine).

Reimagining Education for the Changing Public: From Research to Promising Pedagogy in Racially Diverse Schools

4:05 to 6:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Link to session

This session foregrounds the research and theory behind professional development for educators working in racially and ethnically diverse schools. Based on the knowledge base informing a summer institute designed by faculty and graduate students at one college of education, this session will inspire other educational researchers who focus on issues of race, pedagogy and inequality to translate their theory into practice and provide the critical frameworks and analysis to foster best practices in racially and culturally diverse schools. The presenters are organized according to the four research-based themes of the summer institute: Why Reimagining?; Racial and Cultural Literacy; Equity Pedagogy; and Culturally Sustaining Leadership. The session will be chaired by Susan Fuhrman (Teachers College, Columbia University) Django Paris (University of Washington) serves as discussant.

Coming on Tuesday: The Role of Education Researchers in an Era of Fake News

Tuesday, April 17, 8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor – Beekman
Link to session

This Presidential session will provide a forum for dialogue about how education researchers, individually and collectively, can ensure the integrity of knowledge now and into the future and effectively respond to challenges to facts, data, research, and science.

Read brief essays from session chair Laura Perna (University of Pennsylvania) and presenters Ana Martinez Aleman (Boston College), Prudence Carter (University of California, Berkeley), Jeffrey Henig (Teachers College, Columbia University), Demetri Morgan (Loyola University Chicago), Antar Tichavakunda (University of Southern California), and William Tierney (University of Southern California)here. Reactions and questions can be directed tolperna@upenn.edu in advance of the session. The session will also be live-streamed.

Exhibit Hall and Speaker’s Corner

The exhibit hall in the New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Americas Halls I and II, is open until 6:00 p.m.today. Stop by to visit exhibitors and to pick up a prize card to be entered to win a trip to next year’s Annual Meeting in Toronto!

Today’s Speaker’s Corner schedule features “Getting Education Research in the News” from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. with Jill Barshay (The Hechinger Report) and Tony Pals (Director of Communications at AERA). View the full Speaker’s Corner (in Americas Hall II) schedule here.

Today’s Live-Streaming Sessions

Browse more key speakers, featured presidential sessions, and session hashtags.

2018 Annual Meeting Page | Theme | Registration | Visiting NYC |
Meeting Services | Housing & Travel | Exhibits, Sponsors, Advertising | Contact AERA
2018 Annual Meeting

“The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education”

 

Friday, April 13 – Tuesday, April 17, 2018

New York City, NY

 

This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com. You are receiving this email because of your association with AERA. Click the following link to change your preference or opt out of AERA emails: preferences

American Educational Research Association
1430 K Street, NW, Suite 1200
Washington, DC 20005
www.aera.net

April 15, 2018

AERA18 Insider – Sunday, April 15, 2018

Today’s conference update…

AERA18 Insider
Sunday, April 15, 2018

Welcome to day three of the 2018 AERA Annual Meeting! Each morning, AERA18 Insider will provide tips on key sessions and events, as well as other Annual Meeting resources and highlights you won’t want to miss.

Join the conversation: Use the conference hastag #AERA18, and follow AERA on Twitter at@AERA_EdResearch.

Questions? Contact the AERA Meetings team at annualmtg@aera.net, or check out the Navigating the Annual Meeting section of the program for answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

In this Issue:

AERA Presidential Address: Deborah Loewenberg BallAERA Awards LuncheonDisrupting Amnesia: Disability in the 21st CenturyConnecting Data Sharing to Article PublishingPerspectives and Aspirations of Foundation LeadersAERA Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education: Henry M. LevinAERA Early Career Award: Morgan PolikoffWallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture: Linda T. SmithCreating a Culture of Improvement Through the Empowerment of TeachersExhibit Hall and Speaker’s CornerToday’s Live-Streaming SessionsDownload the Annual Meeting App

Resources

2018 Annual Meeting Sponsors

AERA would like to extend a special thank you to our 2018 sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor
– American Institutes for Research

Gold Sponsor
– SAGE Publishing

Silver Sponsors
– GTCOM
– Mathematica

Bronze Sponsors
– AccessLex Institute
– National Institute of Education
– RAND Corporation

Today’s Highlights

AERA Presidential Address: Deborah Loewenberg Ball, University of Michigan
Just Dreams and Imperatives: The Power of Teaching in the Struggle for Public Education

4:35 p.m. to 5:50 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Grand Ballroom
Session Hashtag: #AERAPres
Link to session

Teaching has enormous potential for contributing to the development of a just society and supporting the flourishing of historically marginalized groups, but it has instead often reproduced inequality and reified injustice through the discretionary spaces that are inherent in teaching. Making the transformative power of the profession more than a dream, but a practical possibility, depends on a wide range of scholarship as well as the conscious exercise of radical imagination for what teaching, and thus, public education, could be and do.

Following the address, Ball will pass the proverbial torch to AERA  President-Elect Amy Stuart Wells (Teachers College, Columbia University), who will being her term at the conclusion of the conference.

A celebratory champagne reception will follow the address.

AERA Awards Luncheon

12:25 p.m. to 2:25 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Grand Ballroom
Session hashtag: #AERAAwards
Link to session

The sixth annual AERA Awards Luncheon is an opportunity to celebrate the field of education research and the accomplishments of AERA-wide awardees and those who receive special citations. Tickets are stil available for the luncheon and can be purchasd online at “My AERA” by all Annual Meeting attendees, while seats remain.

Disrupting Amnesia, Arousing a New Representational Imagination: Disability in the 21st Century

8:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Regent Parlor
Link to session

The purpose of this session is to disrupt traditional conceptualizations and studies of disability intersections with other marked categories, such as gender, race, social class, language background, and sexual orientation. An experimental format will be used to engage interdisciplinary scholarship that transcends the study of individual variables (e.g., cognitive factors, poverty status) or institutional factors (e.g., school size, community or school poverty) to more fully understand the inter-workings of individual, social, historical, and social forces and their consequences for educational opportunity. The session will be chaired by Alfredo J. Artiles (Arizona State University) and Beth A. Ferri (Syracuse University). Participants include Rachel Adams (Columbia University), Susan Burch (Middlebury College), and Karolyn D. Tyson (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill).

Connecting Data Sharing to Article Publishing—How to Maximize the Impact of Your Research

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton North
Link to session

Participants include Jason A. Grissom (Vanderbilt University), Margaret Levenstein (Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research),Arthur (Skip) Lupia (University of Michigan), Robert Ochsendorf (National Science Foundation), Mark Warschauer (University of California, Irvine), and chair Felice J. Levine (AERA).

Perspectives and Aspirations of Foundation Leaders: A Conversation on Advancing Education Research

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Nassau Room East
Link to session

Participants include Adam Gamoran (William T. Grant Foundation), Jacqueline Jones (Foundation for Child Development), Na’ilah Suad Nasir (Spencer Foundation), Kent McGuire (The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation), and chair Jeannie Oakes (University of California, Los Angeles).

AERA Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education Award (2017) Address: Henry M. Levin (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Cost-Effectiveness in Education—Mysteries and Revelations

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Session hashtag: #AERAContributions
Link to session

Much of education research seems to be divided into two separate domains: improving educational effectiveness and practice by providing evidence of gains in standardized test scores, or enhancing social justice by reducing inequality in educational participation, opportunities, and attainments for the least advantaged members of society. The purpose of this presentation is to suggest that we can broaden our research interests and methods to embrace both purposes of education. Examples will be given of how this can be done in whole school reform, school finance, school organization, and educational resource allocation. These examples will also suggest shifts in training with respect to methods of research preparation and application.

The Wallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture: Linda Tuhiwai Smith (The University of Waikato)
From Dream to Possibility to Reality—On Becoming and Being an Indigenous Educational Researcher

2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Trianon Ballroom
Session hashtag: #AERAWallace
Link to session

Linda Tuhiwai Smith (The University of Waikato) will deliver the 2018 Wallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture, “From Dream to Possibility to Reality On Becoming and Being an Indigenous Educational Researcher.”

AERA Early Career Award (2017) Lecture: Morgan Polikoff (University of Southern California)
Reflections on a Quarter Century of Standards-Based Reform

2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton North
Link to session

Morgan Polikoff (University of Southern California) will deliver the Early Career Award Lecture, “Reflections on a Quarter Century of Standards-Based Reform.”

Creating a Culture of Improvement Through the Empowerment of Teachers

2:45 to 4:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Beekman
Link to session

We live in an age in which many researchers, policymakers, and administrators have too much faith that they can put a number on a teacher’s worth. Yet, qualitative and quantitative data suggest that we can’t simply put numbers on what teachers do. Working through a series of reflections and scenarios with speaker Jose L. Vilson (The New York City Department of Education) and chair Suzanne M. Wilson (University of Connecticut), participants will reflect on what it would take to create a culture of improvement that was designed to leverage teacher agency and expertise, rather than thwart it. There will also be a section for room-wide discussion.

Exhibit Hall and Speaker’s Corner

The exhibit hall in the New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Americas Halls I and II, is open until 5:00 p.m.today.

The Speaker’s Corner in Americas Hall II features presentations from organizations including Provalis, IEA/Hamburg Gateway, and the Center for Education Policy Research. View the full Speaker’s Corner schedule here.

Today’s Live-Streaming Sessions

Browse more key speakers, featured presidential sessions, and session hashtags.

2018 Annual Meeting Page | Theme | Registration | Visiting NYC |
Meeting Services | Housing & Travel | Exhibits, Sponsors, Advertising | Contact AERA
2018 Annual Meeting

“The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education”

 

Friday, April 13 – Tuesday, April 17, 2018

New York City, NY

 

This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com. You are receiving this email because of your association with AERA. Click the following link to change your preference or opt out of AERA emails: preferences

American Educational Research Association
1430 K Street, NW, Suite 1200
Washington, DC 20005
www.aera.net

April 13, 2018

AERA 2018 – The Social Construction of School Knowledge

As I mentioned earlier in the week, the 2018 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is happening over the next few days. The third blog entry related to K-12 online learning session from AERA 2018 that I am posting is:

The Social Construction of School Knowledge

In Fifty Years of International Curriculum Studies
Fri, April 13, 4:05 to 6:05pm, New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Gramercy Room West

Abstract – My contribution would examine what might be called, after Michel Callon, the ‘pacification’ of the curriculum: its transformation into stable, inalienable forms that can be claimed as possessions by students. I look back to discussions in JCS on the social construction of knowledge (including my own works on making systems and curricular conversions of cultural capital), but focus in particular on the future and the fate of curriculum in virtual schooling regimes and the educational imaginaries of ‘learning technologists`.

Author
Jan K. Nespor, The Ohio State University

This was the third presentation in a symposium that is described as:

Fifty Years of International Curriculum Studies

Abstract

The international Journal of Curriculum Studies turns 50 in 2018. Since then, it has developed into the most widely used and cited international flagship in its field. The aim of the proposed symposium is to look back on those five decades and, more importantly, to ask based on this how the field may develop in the future. To do so, we have invited authors, whose publications in JCS have had a significant international impact, and who represent different strands and approaches to what curriculum studies have been in the past and could be in the future. In line with the history of the Journal, the symposium will focus on the changing content and context of schooling.

The symposium was designed in a panel format, with each of the presenters having only a short presentation, and then the rest of the session largely being a panel with questions from the audience.

Following comments by Michael Apple and James Spillane, both of who spoke about the field in general and the historical trends, Jan Nespor focused on the current situation and the mobile nature of students these days.  This mobility meant that students didn’t engage with “A” curriculum, but fragments of a curriculum.  He used the example from his own state of Ohio, and stated that there were over 26,000 students passed through the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT), but it only billed the government for 16,000 some odd students.  This means that between 40%-70% of the students that were associated with ECOT did not stick around long enough for ECOT to actually consider them being formally enrolled for FTE funding purposes.  He also said that it was the fact that ECOT has consistency been a failing school or had this revolving door of students that cause it to shut down, but the fact that it couldn’t document to the state’s liking the enrollments that they were billing for.

He also talked a bit about the compression of the curriculum, following a discussion about the neo-liberal attack on time in school.  In the case of K-12 online learning, he used the example of cyber schools where students can basically do very little of their course curriculum for much of the semester, but in the final few weeks work their way through the manner in which these cyber schools deliver curriculum – and that causes a compression of the curriculum.  We see similar things with online credit recovery courses that can literally be completed in minutes, and ironically the only push back against this has been the NCAA or all organizations, that refused to accept credits from many of these cyber schools.

It was interesting to hear how what has often been described as one of the main advantages of K-12 online learning – i.e., the flexibility of online learning (from model to delivery to content to etc.) – changed or should be changing how we are understanding curriculum today.

I stayed around for about 15-20 minutes after the questions began, but since K-12 distance, online, and/or blended learning wasn’t even mentioned once, I decided to duck out and begin my ~90 minute subway and train ride back to the colleague’s home that I am staying while attending AERA.

AERA 2018 – Online Teachers’ and On-Site Facilitators’ Shared Responsibilities at a Supplemental Virtual Secondary School

As I mentioned earlier in the week, the 2018 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is happening over the next few days. The second blog entry related to K-12 online learning session from AERA 2018 that I am posting is:

Online Teachers’ and On-Site Facilitators’ Shared Responsibilities at a Supplemental Virtual Secondary School

In The Teacher’s Perspective: Exploring Professional Development, Teacher Efficacy, and Responsibilities
Fri, April 13, 12:00 to 1:30pm, Westin New York at Times Square, Fifth Floor, Melville Room

Abstract – Local schools are increasingly providing their students who are enrolled in an online course with an on-site facilitator as a means for increasing online pass rates. However, few studies have examined how online teachers and on-site facilitators work in conjunction to support online students. Using purposeful sampling methods, successful on-site facilitators (n=12) and online teachers (n=12) participated in two one-hour interviews for a total of 48 interviews. Analysis found that while both the teachers and facilitators assumed extensive and complex roles, their responsibilities were overlapping but complementary.

Authors
Jered Borup, George Mason University
Rebecca Stimson, Michigan Virtual University

This session was based on research that Jered has completed with the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute.

He began the session by describing the nature of supplemental K-12 online learning, followed by outlining the Adolescent Community of Engagement framework (see https://sites.google.com/site/jeredborup/research-statement and you’ll get some of the relevant citations).

As Michigan passed a law requiring that schools have a school-based mentor, this study was focused on interviews with 12 mentors at schools that had pass rates higher than the state average.  Interestingly, 11 of the facilitators had daily lab time, and 1 had weekly lab time (and that individual was an Assistant Principal that could pull students in individually) – which was an unofficial important finding in and of itself.

Mentors often spent a lot of time preparing for orienting the students, but students often skipped over these items; which required that the mentors do that with the students individually.  The mentors also had to deal with a lot of technical issues and build relationships at the beginning of each semester.  Once the semester got going, the mentors main role shifted to a monitoring and motivating role (e.g., checking progress in the system and then using school-based carrots and sticks).  While instruction was the primary role of the online teacher, the mentors did indicate that the students would often come to them for tutoring (but these 12 individuals did a good job at re-directing those students back to the online teacher).  At the end of the semester, mentors were often busy proctoring exams, communicating with the parents/guardians to get the student finished, and just being a drill sergeant with the students to complete their course(s).

One of the biggest reasons that these mentors were successful is because they were given the time in their schedule to do their job.  Additionally, while the responsibilities of the online teacher and the mentor often overlapped, there was little communication between the two to coordinate those efforts.

The slides for this session are available at: http://goo.gl/orMgQi

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