Virtual School Meanderings

February 4, 2016

REL Midwest Webinar: Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges

From Tuesday’s inbox…

Institute of Education Sciences - Newsflash

REL Midwest Webinar: Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges

REL-Webinar-IconYou are invited to join Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest and its Virtual Education Research Alliance for a free webinar on aligning virtual education professional development with the challenges and preferences expressed by teachers. Presenters will discuss the timing and topics of professional development, the top challenges indicated by online teachers, and the preferred delivery methods for virtual educators. Presenters will also discuss ways to incorporate teacher needs into future professional development trainings.

Speakers:
Jacqueline Zweig, Ph.D., Education Development Center
Erin Stafford, Education Development Center
Dawn Nordine, , Michigan Department of Education
Michele Nickels, , Wisconsin Department of Education
Marcel Kielkucki, , Kirkwood Community College
Gwen Nagel, , Iowa Learning Online

This webinar is designed for K-12 virtual education program staff and administrators, and state and district administrators involved with administering online learning opportunities to diverse student populations.

If you cannot attend the live webinar, register at the link below to be notified when a recording will be available online.

February 8, 2016
1:00–2:00 p.m. CT (2:00–3:00 p.m. ET)
Register here

…CONNECTING RESEARCH, POLICY AND PRACTICE
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January 29, 2016

Reminder – Upcoming Webinar on Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers

From Tuesday’s inbox…

To view this email as a web page, go here.

REL Webinar: Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges

Monday, February 8, 2016
1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. Central Time
2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Eastern Time

Register online at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/818705525521891074

Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest and its Virtual Education Research Alliance are hosting an upcoming webinar discussing the alignment of virtual education professional development with the challenges and preferences expressed by teachers.

The webinar will feature Dr. Jacqueline Zweig and Erin Stafford from Education Development Center, who will present findings from a survey of Wisconsin Virtual School teachers about professional development timing and topics, top instructional challenges, and perceived needs for additional professional development. Next, Dawn Nordine andMichele Nickels from Wisconsin Virtual School will discuss the findings and how they will influence future professional development offerings. Marcel Kielkucki from Kirkwood Community College’s High School Completion Program and Gwen Nagel from Iowa Learning Online will share results and implications from administering the survey within their organizations. Participants will gain insights into challenges and preferred professional development formats reported by Wisconsin Virtual School teachers, which can be used to inform practices at their own schools, districts, or states. Participants will also be provided with information on how to access a tool to assess needs within their own programs.

Topics

  • Timing and topics of professional development for online teachers
  • Top challenges that online teachers face and preferred professional development formats to address those challenges
  • Strategies to incorporate teacher needs and feedback into professional development offerings

This webinar relates to the report Professional Experiences of Online Teachers in Wisconsin: Results from a Survey About Training and Challenges (Zweig, Stafford, Clements, & Pazzaglia, 2015).
To read this report, visit http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?projectID=1463.

For questions or additional information, please contact Cora Goldston by telephone (312-690-7391) or e-mail (cgoldston@air.org).

This email was sent to: mkbarbour@gmail.com

 

This email was sent by: American Institutes for Research
1000 Thomas Jefferson Street NW, Washington, DC 20007-3835 USA

 

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January 21, 2016

Upcoming Webinar – Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges

Also from yesterday’s inbox…

To view this email as a web page, go here.

: Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges

Monday, February 8, 2016
1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. Central Time
2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Eastern Time

Register online at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/818705525521891074

Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest and its Virtual Education Research Alliance are hosting an upcoming webinar discussing the alignment of virtual education professional development with the challenges and preferences expressed by teachers.

The webinar will feature Dr. Jacqueline Zweig and Erin Stafford from Education Development Center, who will present findings from a survey of Wisconsin Virtual School teachers about professional development timing and topics, top instructional challenges, and perceived needs for additional professional development. Next, Dawn Nordine andMichele Nickels from Wisconsin Virtual School will discuss the findings and how they will influence future professional development offerings. Marcel Kielkucki from Kirkwood Community College’s High School Completion Program and Gwen Nagel from Iowa Learning Online will share results and implications from administering the survey within their organizations. Participants will gain insights into challenges and preferred professional development formats reported by Wisconsin Virtual School teachers, which can be used to inform practices at their own schools, districts, or states. Participants will also be provided with information on how to access a tool to assess needs within their own programs.

Topics

  • Timing and topics of professional development for online teachers
  • Top challenges that online teachers face and preferred professional development formats to address those challenges
  • Strategies to incorporate teacher needs and feedback into professional development offerings

This webinar relates to the report Professional Experiences of Online Teachers in Wisconsin: Results from a Survey About Training and Challenges (Zweig, Stafford, Clements, & Pazzaglia, 2015).
To read this report, visit http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?projectID=1463.

For questions or additional information, please contact Cora Goldston by telephone (312-690-7391) or e-mail (cgoldston@air.org).

This email was sent to: mkbarbour@gmail.com

This email was sent by: American Institutes for Research
1000 Thomas Jefferson Street NW, Washington, DC 20007-3835 USA

We respect your right to privacy – view our policy

December 27, 2015

REL Midwest Research Update: Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance

Also from before Christmas…

To view this email as a web page, go here.
REL Midwest Research Update
Alliance Goal:
To provide the Midwest states with research and technical assistance to identify and retain effective educators and to support state efforts to provide an excellent educator for every student.
Message From the Alliance Lead

Patricia BalanaWelcome to the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance (EERA) newsletter. I joined EERA as the alliance lead at the beginning of 2015, and it has been my privilege to work with outstanding educators, policymakers, and stakeholders from Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. This has been a busy year for our alliance, and I am pleased to share with you an update on the important work of EERA on behalf of our members.

States in the Midwest region and across the country have recently updated plans to identify gaps in access to high-quality educators between students in high-poverty and low-poverty schools, explain the causes for these gaps, and set out strategies to address inequities. Our work in the alliance is focused on supporting states’ efforts to provide an excellent educator for every student.

  • We are currently working with the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE) to develop a set of surveys that districts can use to gather information from stakeholders on their experiences with the implementation of teacher evaluation systems. Districts can use these tools to collect data on implementation, as well as to analyze, reflect, and act upon such data to pursue continuous improvement of their evaluation systems.
  • We are assisting an MDE survey development working group to create a survey that districts can administer to students and school staff to collect data for use in teacher and principal evaluations. Our researchers with expertise in survey development methodology are helping the working group to construct, pretest, and pilot surveys that are reliable and valid, and that align with the state’s performance measures and indicators.
  • We worked closely with MDE to redesign its study of teacher supply and demand around five research questions important to Minnesota stakeholders. We recommended methodologies to address each research question on the basis of validity, reliability, data availability, and cost. A report summarizing our methodologies will be publicly available in 2016.

Discussions about educator effectiveness, informed by both policy and research, continue to evolve. Our members worked together this year to identify future challenges surrounding educator effectiveness and consider topics and research questions that will inform the work of our alliance as it moves into 2016. The alliance’s work has informed and will continue to inform the development of evidence-based tools, processes, and policies to help states, districts, and schools address issues of educator effectiveness. I look forward to seeing this high-quality work continue.—Patricia Balana

Collaboration on REL Midwest’s Teacher Supply-and-Demand Study

Richard Wassen, who recently retired as the Director of Educator Licensing at MDE, served on EERA for four years. REL Midwest sat down with Wassen before he left his post to hear about highlights from his work with REL Midwest. Read our interview, which includes audio clips, on REL Midwest’s Newsroom: Research in Use: Collaboration on REL Midwest’s Teacher Supply-and Demand Study.

Survey Methods Workshop Develops MDE’s Internal Expertise

In August 2014, REL Midwest conducted a one-day workshop for MDE, through EERA, to improve the department’s internal capacity to plan, develop, and administer surveys. The workshop covered best practices in survey methodology and shared supplementary reference materials.

Through this workshop, REL Midwest and MDE united researchers’ expertise in survey development and administration with MDE’s understanding of the department’s internal structure and resources. The training session facilitated communication among the researchers and MDE staff members by enabling the staff members to pose questions and explain their contexts in real time. This immediate feedback allowed the researchers to provide relevant and actionable information. In addition, staff members from different departments within MDE discovered shared challenges and had the opportunity to brainstorm solutions together, with input from REL Midwest’s researchers.

After the workshop, 10 of the 50 participants formed an internal survey team to support colleagues conducting surveys. The team members come from different program areas within MDE, and are supported by researchers from the Midwest Comprehensive Center. This group also adapted the workshop materials to create tools specific to MDE and its processes, including a survey checklist. This internal team intends to serve as a resource to review major surveys conducted by MDE, applying best practices and streamlining resources to ensure that the surveys conducted by the department meet their objectives.

“When we need a new survey, we have an internal team that can apply certain criteria so we aren’t releasing a poorly designed survey, which would give us poor results,” said Tyler Livingston, educator evaluation supervisor at MDE and EERA member. “That team helps us deliver a quality survey product so we get meaningful results back from our stakeholders.”

“Partnering with REL Midwest helped us gain tools that align with our vision,” Livingston added. “And, in the process, we are now better prepared to do some survey design at a certain level of quality, whereas before we did not have the background knowledge to do so.”

REL Midwest and the internal survey team plan to build on the original workshop with two new sessions on survey data analysis and reporting. The researchers and internal experts will present the workshop together and respond to requests to include more hands-on working time and to tailor examples to the department’s current projects.

Meet the Alliance Member: Erika Bolig

Erika Bolig, Ph.D.Erika Bolig, Ph.D., is director of the Michigan Department of Education’s Office of Evaluation, Strategic Research, and Accountability. She joined EERA in the summer of 2015, but previously she had been a member of REL Midwest’s School Turnaround Research Alliance. She has brought considerable expertise and a fresh perspective to EERA, and she says EERA has been a welcome source of support for her work in Michigan.

Previously active only in Minnesota, EERA recently expanded its reach within the Midwest. Bolig was excited to learn about the alliance’s expansion since educator effectiveness had become particularly relevant to her daily work with the Michigan Department of Education. Along with fellow EERA member Steve Best, Bolig had been advising Michigan Department of Education leadership and offices on proposed legislation regarding educator effectiveness, educator evaluations, and implementation of existing legislation. Bolig explains that the research made available to her by EERA helped inform their policy discussions.

“[Alliance lead Patricia Balana] and the other states have been a phenomenal resource for us,” said Bolig. “For example, I had posed a question to Patricia about what evaluation tools are appropriate for special education teachers. She pulled a whole bunch of research, which helped us when talking internally, with people in the field, and in some discussions with legislators.”

Ultimately, Bolig and Best will use this support from REL Midwest to help influence the department’s implementation of Public Act 173, which revises previous legislation regarding the performance evaluation system for teachers and administrators in Michigan.

Bolig is confident that Michigan’s inclusion in EERA will provide her department with much needed support in their research and data-collection efforts. Bolig also plans on using the group’s pooled expertise to brainstorm strategies for implementing research and evaluation measures across diverse districts.

According to Bolig, the ability to hear from other state education agencies, as well as experts from REL Midwest, has been incredibly valuable.

“We are pretty limited in terms of what we have for data at this point in time at the state level relative to educator evaluation systems,” she said. “But we are learning from what the other states have and trying to use that to inform what we might do moving forward.”

Meet the Researcher: Yinmei Wan

Lyzz DavisREL Midwest researcher Yinmei Wan, Ph.D., has worked with EERA since 2014.

Wan’s path to researching educator effectiveness has taken her around the world. A native of Chonqing, China, Wan served as an English language instructor as well as an instructional coach for English language teachers in China early in her career.

“When I was applying to graduate school, I knew I wanted to do something in education and was fortunate to be accepted into the top-ranked doctoral program in higher education at the University of Michigan,” explained Wan.

At the University of Michigan, Wan focused on issues of assessment, evaluation, and organizational management.

“Although my work in graduate school was focused at the higher education level, it allowed me to build a solid foundation to understand how complex organizations and systems operate and change,” she said.

Wan sees her current work with REL Midwest as an exciting opportunity to delve into projects across K–16 educational topic areas.

“Researching K–12 issues feels totally different than higher education, but I love the broad range of topics and methodological challenges,” said Wan.

Today, Wan leads or coleads multiple projects under EERA. In a recent project, she supported MDE to redesign its teacher supply-and-demand study. She is currently working with MDE on a project to develop a stakeholder feedback survey to be used in principal evaluation and growth.

“This project has been a favorite of mine,” noted Wan. “We are working closely with a survey working group of individuals from school districts, the teacher’s union, and MDE. Hearing their perspectives has been very valuable as we develop this survey.”

Wan enjoys this collaborative approach to research and noted that it has made her more conscious of how research will be used.

“As I’m working directly with practitioners in the field, I’m much more aware of what their needs are and how our research can support their work,” explained Wan.

Educator Effectiveness Events and Resources

Resources

Events

  • Educator Evaluation System Data: What Exists and How Do We Use It? —a REL Midwest/EERA webinar held October 29, 2015—addressed different designs of educator evaluation systems and how data from these systems can inform teacher and district practice. Mariann Lemke of the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders discussed research related to the evaluation of educator practice and student growth. EERA members Tyler Livingston of MDE and Katie Rainey of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction shared how their states use educator evaluation system data. Presentation slides and notes are archived online.
  • More than just an education priority, ensuring that all students have access to high-quality teachers is a federal mandate. REL Midwest, REL Southwest, REL West, and the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders recently cohosted Equitable Access to Excellent Educators: State Planning Resources. Among the webinar presenters were Mariann Lemke, MDE Assistant Commissioner Hue Nguyen, and MDE Director of the Division of School Support and EERA member Greg Keith.
Contact Us
Please contact us for more information
about any of the items in this newsletter
or to speak to a member of our staff.
We look forward to hearing from you.       
REL Midwest at American Institutes for Research
Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance
1120 East Diehl Road, Suite 200
Naperville, IL 60563-1486
866-730-6735
www.relmidwest.org

This material was prepared under Contract ED-IES-12-C-0004 by Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest, administered by American Institutes for Research. The content of the publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) or the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government.

 

This email was sent to: mkbarbour@gmail.com

 

This email was sent by: American Institutes for Research
1000 Thomas Jefferson Street NW, Washington, DC 20007-3835 USA

November 26, 2015

Rural Research Update, November 2015

Note there is a K-12 online learning item in the “Resources” list below…

To view this email as a web page, go here.
REL Midwest Research Update
Alliance Goal:
To increase awareness of rural-specific issues related to postsecondary access and success in the Midwest and to help improve stakeholder capacity to most effectively target resources
for rural populations.
Message From the Alliance Lead

Victoria CirksI was born in a small town that at the time had fewer than 1,400 residents. My father was raised in a town of around 950; my mother grew up in a community of around 8,500. What do these communities have in common? Each one is considered a rural community.

The fascinating diversity of our nation’s rural communities presents educators, policymakers, and community members with a number of assets and challenges as they work to provide the best educational opportunities to students. The Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest Rural Research Alliance works to help address these challenges.

The members of the Rural Research Alliance are invested in improving postsecondary outcomes for rural students, recruiting and supporting highly effective teachers and administrators in our rural communities, and implementing innovative and technology-enabled instructional strategies to assist both students and educators. I look forward to working with our alliance members to explore these issues further in 2016.—Victoria Cirks

Lessons Learned From Examining College Enrollment Patterns in Rural Indiana

A gap exists in college enrollment between rural and nonrural high school graduates in the United States. This issue is especially relevant in Indiana, where 31 percent of high school students attend rural schools. Increasing rural students’ postsecondary educational attainment requires a better understanding of the factors that influence different types of students.

To examine this issue, REL Midwest conducted a study and released a report, College Enrollment Patterns for Rural Indiana High School Graduates. Policymakers and school leaders in Indiana have committed to increasing postsecondary degree attainment, and this study supported Indiana’s work by providing descriptive information about the college enrollment patterns of the state’s rural high school graduates.

“This study answers some of the misconceptions regarding the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of college choices of rural Indiana students,” said John Hill, Ed.D., executive director of the National Rural Education Association (NREA) and a member of REL Midwest’s Rural Research Alliance.

Using 2010 student data primarily culled from Indiana’s Student Information System, the REL Midwest research team analyzed differences in rural and nonrural college enrollment rates. As senior researcher Elisabeth Davis explains, the study also examined the academic rigor of the colleges that students chose to attend.

The study found that rural and nonrural students had similar academic preparation, but there were key differences in college enrollment trends. Rural students were more likely to enroll in two-year colleges than were nonrural students. Davis also found that rural students were more likely to “undermatch”: They were more likely to enroll in colleges for which they were more than academically well qualified than their nonrural peers.

The following key demographic differences exist between rural and nonrural graduates:

  • Rural students traveled greater distances to attend two-year and less selective four-year colleges than did nonrural students.
  • Rural students were less likely to be eligible for school lunch programs than were their nonrural peers, suggesting that rural students have a lower poverty rate.
  • Previous research indicates that rural students plan to stay in their communities as adults, a factor that may influence their college choices.

Previous research suggests that several factors could affect rural students’ college enrollment decisions, including the possibility of high-paying technology jobs that do not require four-year degrees and a desire to stay in their communities. The availability of information regarding postsecondary options also may affect the choices made by rural and nonrural graduates.

Davis emphasizes the importance of state-specific research to address challenges. For example, Indiana may present a unique relationship between students’ rural locations and economic conditions that differs from the nation as a whole; that is, rural graduates in Indiana do not necessarily have higher poverty rates than their nonrural counterparts. This suggests that there are factors influencing two-year college enrollment among rural Indiana graduates that are unrelated to poverty and socioeconomic status.

Read the full report here, and view the related infographic here.

Meet the Alliance Member: Fred Nolan, Ph.D.

Fred Nolan, Ph.D.Fred Nolan, Ph.D., is executive director of the Minnesota Rural Education Association (MREA) and a member of REL Midwest’s Rural Education Research Alliance. Dr. Nolan joined the alliance soon after he became MREA’s executive director in 2011.

MREA brings together school board members, administrators, teachers, and community members to serve rural school districts in Minnesota through advocacy, professional development, and networking. As executive director, Dr. Nolan drives communications, analysis, and recruitment. He coordinates MREA staff to share information with members through e-blasts and other communications mechanisms to ensure everyone stays up to date on rural education issues affecting the state. He analyzes complex data from the state education agency to distill the most actionable information for the legislature and school districts. He attends in-person meetings with superintendents from member and nonmember school districts to share the organization’s mission and to encourage participation. In fact, Dr. Nolan put more than 3,000 miles on his car in September traveling to these meetings across the state.

Dr. Nolan spent 36 years as an educator prior to joining MREA. He served as a teacher, principal, and superintendent in seven school districts—six of them rural—in Minnesota. He says his practitioner background is invaluable in his current role.

“If I hadn’t lived those roles with students, teachers, administrators, school boards, and communities, I wouldn’t be able to size something up and say, ‘How’s that going to work?'” he said. “It’s easier to visualize or imagine what a prospective law is going to do statewide.”

Dr. Nolan relies on quality research from REL Midwest and other organizations when advocating at the state level. Recently, MREA advocated and shared information with members about aproposal to introduce new credentialing requirements for Minnesota’s secondary teachers to teach dual-credit programs. In an e-blast, MREA shared REL Midwest’s reference desk response on research into dual enrollment in rural education, among other information.

Dr. Nolan also finds value in REL Midwest’s research in other states in the region. A report from REL Midwest’s Rural Research Alliance, College Enrollment Patterns for Rural Indiana High School Graduates, found rural graduates in the state enrolled more frequently in two-year colleges than nonrural graduates. About one third of rural graduates, compared to one quarter of nonrural graduates, enrolled in colleges that were less selective than colleges for which they were presumptively eligible. Rural graduates also travel farther to attend two-year or less selective four-year colleges than nonrural graduates. (For more information on this report, see the previous section of this newsletter, “Lessons Learned From Examining College Enrollment Patterns in Rural Indiana.”)

“This research informed hunches of mine about what was happening in rural Minnesota,” Dr. Nolan said. “If you have research from another state that’s very similar in terms of its composition of rural school districts, it’s helpful. You’re able to move with more confidence and refer people back to the research. You have more than just your opinion, which is incredibly important.”

Meet the Researcher: Ayrin Molefe, Ph.D.

Ayrin Molefe, Ph.D.Ayrin Molefe, Ph.D., is a senior statistician and methodologist for the American Institutes for Research, with more than 15 years of experience in statistical analysis, consulting, and teaching. Her expertise includes formulating scientifically based research designs and analyzing complex educational data sets.

Molefe’s involvement with the Rural Research Alliance is her first experience with both rural education issues and collaborative research. In addition to helping alliance members formulate research questions and determine the types of research that may be used to answer those questions, she also serves as principal investigator for the study Differences in Postsecondary Educational Aspirations and Attainment for Rural Versus Nonrural Students.

Currently under way, the study examines differences in postsecondary aspirations and the realization of those aspirations between rural and nonrural high school students in the Midwest and in the rest of the nation. Alliance members plan to use the findings to identify supports needed for improving postsecondary goal attainment among Midwest rural students and to inform policy recommendations.

“I think the best part about the research alliance concept is the emphasis on collaborative research with practitioners,” Molefe said. “It’s so much better than an approach of ‘I’m the researcher and I’m here to feed research to the stakeholders.'”

Recent Event Highlights Rural Dropout Challenge

The Rural Research Alliance partnered with WFYI in Indianapolis in September 2015 to film a public television special, Dropout Prevention in Rural Schools. The event focused on research and trends related to high school dropout prevention in rural areas and featured lessons learned from Jennings County Schools, a rural school district in southern Indiana.

The panel discussion featured alliance member John Hill, Ed.D., NREA executive director, who discussed specific challenges to rural dropout prevention efforts, including limited financial resources and limited community connections to postsecondary education. Terry Sargent, Ph.D., superintendent of Jennings County Schools, emphasized the value of extracurricular activities and exposing students to “real-world” simulations to keep students engaged. Caitlin Howley, Ph.D., fellow at ICF International, discussed how schools in rural areas could leverage connections with businesses and families in the area to strengthen opportunities for mentorship and student support.

The filmed panel discussion first aired on WFYI on October 3, 2015, as part of the station’s programming for American Graduate Day 2015. We encourage you to watch the archived program on WFYI’s YouTube channel.

Rural Resources and Events

Resources

  • To learn more about what’s happening in the field of rural education, check out theNREA UPdate, the official electronic newsletter of the National Rural Education Association.
  • REL Northeast & Islands and their Northeast Rural Districts Research Alliance published a report in March 2015 on the use of online courses in high schools in the New York Greater Capital Region.
  • Visit the REL Midwest Ask a REL archive to learn what research is available on a variety of rural education topics, including support for rural administrators who serve multiple roles and rural districts that share administrators.

Events

Events Image

  • NREA convened its 107th Annual Conference and Research Symposium on October 17 and 18 in St. Louis. REL Midwest’s rural research team, represented by senior researcher Elisabeth Davis, was presented with the Dawson Award for Best Research Paper for College Enrollment Patterns for Rural Indiana High School Graduates.
  • REL Midwest will present at the American Educational Research Association’s 2016 symposium in April 2016 in Washington, D.C. A REL Midwest study team, led by Davis, will host a session, “Studies of Rural Students’ College Enrollment and Persistence in Pennsylvania, Oregon, and Indiana.” This session will explore the findings of three separate studies that address college-going and persistence patterns.
Contact Us
Please contact us for more information
about any of the items in this newsletter
or to speak to a member of our staff.
We look forward to hearing from you.       
REL Midwest at American Institutes for Research
Rural Research Alliance
1120 East Diehl Road, Suite 200
Naperville, IL 60563-1486
866-730-6735
www.relmidwest.org

This material was prepared under Contract ED-IES-12-C-0004 by Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest, administered by American Institutes for Research. The content of the publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) or the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government.

 

This email was sent to: mkbarbour@gmail.com

 

This email was sent by: American Institutes for Research
1000 Thomas Jefferson Street NW, Washington, DC 20007-3835 USA

 

We respect your right to privacy – view our policy

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