Virtual School Meanderings

April 25, 2022

AERA 2022 – Timing of Enrollment and Online Course Completion

The twenty-sixth of the K-12 Online Learning sessions from the 2022 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association that I am blogging is:

Timing of Enrollment and Online Course Completion

  • In Event: Supporting K–12 Teaching and Learning With Online Resources and Tools

Mon, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30am PDT (8:00 to 9:30am PDT), SIG Virtual Rooms, SIG-Online Teaching and Learning Virtual Paper Session Room

Abstract

Prior to the pandemic, online course taking was widespread in both K-12 and postsecondary education. As a result of school closures, even more schools enrolled students in online courses. However, many questions remain about how to provide effective instruction virtually and the structures that facilitate student success in their online courses, including the influence of the enrollment process (e.g., which students enroll, who enrolls them, and when). This study utilizes data on over 8,000 students enrolled in online high school courses to examine whether the timing of enrollment in online courses relates to students’ subsequent course outcomes. The results suggest that students who enrolled on-time were more likely to complete their courses than students who enrolled late.

Authors

  • Jacqueline Zweig, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Erin Stafford, Education Development Center, Inc.

Which was part of this larger session:

Supporting K–12 Teaching and Learning With Online Resources and Tools

Mon, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30am PDT (8:00 to 9:30am PDT), SIG Virtual Rooms, SIG-Online Teaching and Learning Virtual Paper Session RoomSession Type: Paper Session

Abstract

Preparation and support for K-12 teaching with online resources and tools is a growing area of interest. Supporting K-12 learners is also garnering increasing interest. This session will feature research research about K-12 online teaching and learning. Presentations feature international work as well as work from the United States.

Sub Unit

  • SIG-Online Teaching and Learning

Chair

  • Jacqueline Zweig, Education Development Center, Inc.

Papers

  • Online Teaching in K–12 Education: A Systematic Review – Carla C. Johnson, North Carolina State University; Janet Walton, North Carolina State University; Jennifer Brammer Elliott, North Carolina State University; Lacey Jean Strickler Eppard, University of Toledo
  • Timing of Enrollment and Online Course Completion – Jacqueline Zweig, Education Development Center, Inc.; Erin Stafford, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • A Novel Adoption of Two Online Teaching Self-Evaluation Instruments Among a Public Pre-K–12 Teacher Sample – Virginia Byrne, Morgan State University; Diane Jass Ketelhut, University of Maryland – College Park
  • Factors Influencing Chinese K–12 Teachers’ Intention to Teach Online During the Pandemic – Yu Qing, East China Normal University
  • Homeschooling in Norway During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Unequal Opportunities and Little Digital Innovation – Cecilie Pedersen Dalland, OsloMet – Oslo Metropolitan University; Marte Blikstad-Balas, University of Oslo; Kirsti Klette, University of Oslo; Astrid Roe, University of Oslo

Discussant

  • Mary F. Rice, The University of New Mexico

This study focused on examining when students enrolled in supplemental online courses and their eventual outcome.  Prior to the pandemic, there were approximately 1,000,000 students engaged in supplemental online learning – and as we begin to emerge from the pandemic more and more school districts are offering supplemental online learning.

The study itself was based on a statewide virtual school in a Midwestern state that had an online learning graduation requirement (and those in the field should know which state this is).  The actual research questions were:

The sample was 8,256 students enrolled in ~400 different courses in the Fall 2018.  In terms of the overall outcome from these students, it looked like this:

The data were analyzed using the following variables.

The results revealed.

From a practical standpoint, it begs the questions of how long should you allow a student to enroll in the course, and for those who enroll late what kinds of additional supports might be needed.  Should more be done to encourage students to enroll early or on time?  Should programs have harder cut off enrollment dates and, if so, what is the sweet spot for that cut off?

AERA 2022 – Online Teaching in K–12 Education: A Systematic Review

The twenty-fifth of the K-12 Online Learning sessions from the 2022 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association that I am blogging is:

Online Teaching in K–12 Education: A Systematic Review

  • In Event: Supporting K–12 Teaching and Learning With Online Resources and Tools

Mon, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30am PDT (8:00 to 9:30am PDT), SIG Virtual Rooms, SIG-Online Teaching and Learning Virtual Paper Session Room

Abstract

This study was a systematic review of literature regarding K-12 online teaching and learning was therefore conducted to begin to fill this gap and to inform the work of policy makers, researchers, teacher educators, teachers, and administrators as they negotiate the changing role of online instruction in our nation’s educational systems. The review revealed a set of contextual conditions that are foundational to student learning in K-12 online settings. The literature also pointed to seven pillars of instructional practice that support student learning in these settings (evidence-based course organization and design, connected learners, accessibility, supportive learning environment, individualization, active learning, and real-time assessment).

Authors

  • Carla C. Johnson, North Carolina State University
  • Janet Walton, North Carolina State University
  • Jennifer Brammer Elliott, North Carolina State University
  • Lacey Jean Strickler Eppard, University of Toledo

Which was part of this larger session:

Supporting K–12 Teaching and Learning With Online Resources and Tools

Mon, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30am PDT (8:00 to 9:30am PDT), SIG Virtual Rooms, SIG-Online Teaching and Learning Virtual Paper Session RoomSession Type: Paper Session

Abstract

Preparation and support for K-12 teaching with online resources and tools is a growing area of interest. Supporting K-12 learners is also garnering increasing interest. This session will feature research research about K-12 online teaching and learning. Presentations feature international work as well as work from the United States.

Sub Unit

  • SIG-Online Teaching and Learning

Chair

  • Jacqueline Zweig, Education Development Center, Inc.

Papers

  • Online Teaching in K–12 Education: A Systematic Review – Carla C. Johnson, North Carolina State University; Janet Walton, North Carolina State University; Jennifer Brammer Elliott, North Carolina State University; Lacey Jean Strickler Eppard, University of Toledo
  • Timing of Enrollment and Online Course Completion – Jacqueline Zweig, Education Development Center, Inc.; Erin Stafford, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • A Novel Adoption of Two Online Teaching Self-Evaluation Instruments Among a Public Pre-K–12 Teacher Sample – Virginia Byrne, Morgan State University; Diane Jass Ketelhut, University of Maryland – College Park
  • Factors Influencing Chinese K–12 Teachers’ Intention to Teach Online During the Pandemic – Yu Qing, East China Normal University
  • Homeschooling in Norway During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Unequal Opportunities and Little Digital Innovation – Cecilie Pedersen Dalland, OsloMet – Oslo Metropolitan University; Marte Blikstad-Balas, University of Oslo; Kirsti Klette, University of Oslo; Astrid Roe, University of Oslo

Discussant

  • Mary F. Rice, The University of New Mexico

This study was a IES-funded literature review that looked at what were the best practices for K-12 online teaching, which the presenters situated in light of the pandemic (without really making any distinction between online learning and remote learning).  The presenters used terms such as online, distance, virtual, cyber, and remote (emphasis added by me).  The search yielded 328 articles.

Based on their review of those 328 articles, they developed the framework below.

In terms of their two specific research questions, the presenters provided the following results.

These findings resulted in the following implications.

With respect to that third item, I have often said before how much literature is enough before we stop referring to our literature as scarce?  There is always room for more research, I mean there is still much to learn about direct instruction in the classroom which has been around for hundreds of years or Socratic questioning which has been around for thousands of years.  And other than heeding the warnings of a small group of researchers that suggested this might be something to focus on online learning as a way to address disruptions in the system, what exactly could have been done to prepare the education system for a complete shutdown for months and continued disruption for years – particularly when the political dynamic had everything from this being armageddon to this was just cold and flu season?

April 24, 2022

AERA 2022 – Successes and Challenges With Antiracist Community-Building in Online Environments: A Dual Pandemic Intersection

The twenty-fourth of the K-12 Online Learning sessions from the 2022 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association that I am blogging is:

Successes and Challenges With Antiracist Community-Building in Online Environments: A Dual Pandemic Intersection (Poster 34)

  • In Event: AERA Poster Session 10
    In Poster Session: 2022 Education Research Service Project Poster Session

Sun, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00pm PDT (2:30 to 4:00pm PDT), San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Sails Pavillion

Abstract

Covid-19 has disrupted education as usual. Our region of St. Louis is continuing to see cases increase daily, especially amongst historically marginalized communities. As a response, education leaders have called for remote learning in K-12. However, most K-12 teachers have not been trained in how to teach online. Researchers agree that physical classroom learning cannot simply be copied into online spaces. Online teaching requires innovative and unique methods. Of particular concern in K-12 spaces is building community online. This study utilizes quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate building community in online learning with K-12 students and teachers. Our two main research question are: What successes and challenges do teachers report when enacting antiracist community building with K-12 students in online environments? and How does participation in an online professional learning community that cuts across the racial divide in St. Louis impact teachers? Participants include 50 K-12 teachers from diverse schools in St. Louis who participate in virtual professional learning circle discussions. The professional learning circles focus on building community during online learning in two ways: first for teachers to build a professional support network and second to build community with their students.

Authors

  • Shea Kerkhoff, University of Missouri – St. Louis
  • Chea Lynn Parton, The University of North Texas
  • Fatemeh Mardi, University of Missouri System
  • Katherine O’Daniels, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Which was part of this larger session:

2022 Education Research Service Project Poster Session

  • In Event: AERA Poster Session 10

Sun, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00pm PDT (2:30 to 4:00pm PDT), San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Sails PavillionSession Type: Poster Session

Abstract

2022 Educational Research Service Project Poster Session

Sub Unit

  • AERA Sessions

Chair

  • Lori Diane Hill, American Educational Research Association

Papers

  • 30. Adolescent Well-Being and School Diversity: A Needs-Based Partnership Examining Virtual Learning and Interventions in Light of COVID-19 and Systemic Racism (Poster 30) – Jacqueline Cerda-Smith, North Carolina State University
  • 31. Beyond Music: Exploring the Experiences of Predominantly Hispanic Students and Parents in a Nonprofit Arts Organization During COVID-19 (Poster 31) – Andrea Lopez Salazar, Teachers College, Columbia University; Patricia Amanda Olivas, Teachers College, Columbia University; Adriana Diaz-Donoso, Teachers College, Columbia University
  • 32. English Learner Pathways in Community College (Poster 32) – Angela Johnson, NWEA; Diana G. Mercado-Garcia, University of California – San Diego
  • 33. Equity From the Start: Latinx Families and Their Experiences With Tele-Education and Telehealth due to COVID-19 (Poster 33) – Laurie Ross, Clark University; Jie Yie Park, Clark University
  • 34. Successes and Challenges With Antiracist Community-Building in Online Environments: A Dual Pandemic Intersection (Poster 34) – Shea Kerkhoff, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Chea Lynn Parton, The University of North Texas; Fatemeh Mardi, University of Missouri System; Katherine O’Daniels, University of Missouri – St. Louis
  • 35. The Anti-Defamation League’s Peer Training Program: Developing a Sustainable Method for Ongoing Program Evaluation and Report Generation (Poster 35) – Melissa K. Holt, Boston University; Jennifer Greif Green, Boston University; Christine Marsico, Boston University; Phil Fogelman, Anti-Defamation League
  • 36. Valuing Indigenous Mathematical Knowledge: Collaborating With Guatemalan Teachers for the Instruction of Mesoamerican Numbers (Poster 36) – Carlos Alfonso LopezLeiva, University of New Mexico; Melissa A. Gallagher, University of Houston; Travis Weiland, University of Houston; Carlos Nicolas Gomez, The University of Texas at Austin; Maria Isolina Ruiz, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Unfortunately, I’m on my way to the airport when this poster is being presented.  However, the presenters did upload a copy to the iPresentation system, so I have taken screens shots of it below.

 

AERA 2022 – Middle School Students’ Remote Interactions and Their Influence on Academic Motivation During the COVID-19 Pandemic

The twenty-third of the K-12 Online Learning sessions from the 2022 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association that I am blogging is:

Middle School Students’ Remote Interactions and Their Influence on Academic Motivation During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Poster 7)

  • In Event: AERA Poster Session 10
    In Poster Session: Motivation in Education SIG Poster Session: Contextual Factors, Teacher Motivation, and Motivational Interventions (San Diego)

Sun, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00pm PDT (2:30 to 4:00pm PDT), San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Sails Pavillion

Abstract

Over the past few decades, researchers demonstrated that peers are viewed as powerful
socialization agents for the development of children’s achievement motivation (Kindermann,
2007; Ladd et al., 2009; Ryan, 2001). However, children’s interactions in schools have changed
drastically in many countries with the pandemic. National and local quarantines and school
closures have severely limited children’s daily face-to-face interaction with their peers (Cameron
& Tenenbaum, 2021). Also, Duckworth et al. (2021) found that high school students who
attended remote education have lower social, emotional, and academic well-being than those
who attended in-person. Therefore, this study examines the remote interactions of middle school
students and their influences on their motivation (expectancies for success and intrinsic value).

Authors

  • Utku Caybas, University of Kentucky
  • Deniz Seyda Tarim, Ustun Dokmen Academy
  • Yesim Capa Aydin, Middle East Technical University

Which was part of this larger session:

Motivation in Education SIG Poster Session: Contextual Factors, Teacher Motivation, and Motivational Interventions (San Diego)

  • In Event: AERA Poster Session 10

Sun, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00pm PDT (2:30 to 4:00pm PDT), San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Sails PavillionSession Type: Poster Session

Sub Unit

  • SIG-Motivation in Education

Papers

  • 3. Broadening the Understanding of Teachers’ Individual, Class-Directed, and Differentiated Autonomy Support With Bayesian Multilevel Analyses (Poster 3) – Barbara Flunger, Utrecht University; Anouk VerdonschotSteffen ZitzmannLisette Hornstra, University of Amsterdam; Tamara van Gog, Utrecht University
  • 4. Examining Marginalized Students’ Expectancies and Values While on Academic Probation (Poster 4) – Temitope F. Adeoye, Purdue University; Toni Kempler Rogat, Purdue University
  • 5. “I Feel It’s a Mutiny”: Teachers’ Beliefs About Their Students’ Agentic Engagement in Urban High School Science Classrooms (Poster 5) – Jeanette Zambrano, University of Southern California; Erika Alisha Patall, University of Southern California; Alana Aiko Uilani Kennedy, University of Southern California; Crystal Aguilera, University of Southern California; Nicole Marissa Yates, University of Southern California
  • 6. Improving Motivation and Achievement in Community College Math: The Efficacy of a Utility-Value Intervention (Poster 6) – Michelle Francis, University of Virginia; Delaram A. Totonchi, University of Virginia; Megan Moran, University of Virginia; Joshua Davis, University of Virginia; Yoi Tibbetts, University of Virginia; Kenn E. Barron, James Madison University; Chris S. Hulleman, University of Virginia
  • 7. Middle School Students’ Remote Interactions and Their Influence on Academic Motivation During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Poster 7) – Utku Caybas, University of Kentucky; Deniz Seyda Tarim, Ustun Dokmen Academy; Yesim Capa Aydin, Middle East Technical University
  • 8. More Cost, but Better Performance? Unexpected Effects of a Cost-Focused Intervention in College Biology (Poster 8) – Emily Quinn Rosenzweig, University of Georgia; Yuchen Song, University of Georgia – Athens; Shannon Clark, University of Georgia
  • 9. Profiles of Teachers’ Value Beliefs and Costs (Poster 9) – Rachel Part, University of Nevada – Las Vegas; Harsha Perera, University of Nevada – Las Vegas; Brenda Anne Pearson, University of Nevada – Las Vegas; Fae Ung, University of Nevada – Las Vegas; Colleen Priya Narayan, University of Nevada – Las Vegas
  • 10. Quality of Relationships at Work and Psychological Need Satisfaction and Thwarting: Evidence From Three Studies (Poster 10) – Alice Levasseur, Université Laval; Louise Clément, Université Laval; Caterina Mamprin, Université de Moncton
  • 11. Student Responsiveness to Relevance Interventions in Math: Antecedents and Consequences (Poster 11) – Hanna Gaspard, TU Dortmund University; Cora Parrisius, Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology, University of Tübingen; Ulrich Trautwein, University of Tubingen; Benjamin Nagengast, University of Tübingen
  • 12. The Emotional Experiences of Preservice Social Studies Teachers Facilitating Discussions on Complex Social Topics (Poster 12) – Joseph Eisman, Temple University; Andrew del Calvo, University of Pennsylvania; Timothy Patterson, Temple University; Avi Kaplan, Temple University; Abby Reisman, University of Pennsylvania
  • 13. University Faculty Motivation for Teaching and Research: A Systematic Literature Review (Poster 13) – Robert H. Stupnisky, University of North Dakota; Chialin Chang, University of North Dakota; Makinde Omojiba, University of North Dakota; Ademola Amida, North Dakota State University; Virginia Clinton-Lisell, University of North Dakota; Michael James Herbert, University of North Dakota; Jordan Jaeger, University of North Dakota; Mojdeh J Mardani, University of North Dakota

Unfortunately, I’m on my way to the airport when this poster is being presented.  However, the presenters did upload a copy to the iPresentation system, so I have taken screens shots of it below.

AERA 2022 – Special Educators’ Experiences Pivoting From Face-to-Face to Virtual During COVID-19: A Phenomenological Study

The twenty-second of the K-12 Online Learning sessions from the 2022 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association that I am blogging is:

Special Educators’ Experiences Pivoting From Face-to-Face to Virtual During COVID-19: A Phenomenological Study

  • In Event: AERA Roundtable Session 12
    In Roundtable Session: Perspectives on COVID-19 and Special and Inclusive Education (Table 25)

Sun, April 24, 8:00 to 9:30am PDT (8:00 to 9:30am PDT), San Diego Convention Center, Exhibit Hall B

Abstract

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of special educators in the pivot from face-to-face to virtual learning during COVID-19. A national sample of 46 participants volunteered to join the study. Individual, recorded interviews and two focus groups were conducted by the research team. Data analysis included coding, cross coding, triangulation, and member checking as a means of deeply understanding the essence of participant experience. Study findings can be used to inform educational stakeholders and policy makers of the challenges found within special education, the unique strengths that special educators bring to the system, and how, through collaboration, we might initiate systemic change in support of special education teachers.

Authors

  • Jennifer Courduff, Azusa Pacific University
  • Peter A. Hessling, North Carolina State University
  • Jean Kiekel, University of St. Thomas

Which was part of this larger session:

Perspectives on COVID-19 and Special and Inclusive Education (Table 25)

  • In Event: AERA Roundtable Session 12

Sun, April 24, 8:00 to 9:30am PDT (8:00 to 9:30am PDT), San Diego Convention Center, Exhibit Hall BSession Type: Roundtable Session

Sub Unit

  • SIG-Special and Inclusive Education Research

Chair

  • Gabriela Walker, National University

Papers

  • Experiences of Students With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Before and During COVID-19: A National Survey – Esther Lindström, Lehigh University; Jenny Root, Florida State University; Deidre Paige Gilley, Florida State University; rui chen, Lehigh University
  • Special Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic – Sarah Hurwitz, Indiana University – Bloomington; Blaine Garman-McClaine, Indiana University – Bloomington; Kane Carlock, Indiana University – Bloomington
  • Special Educators’ Experiences Pivoting From Face-to-Face to Virtual During COVID-19: A Phenomenological Study – Jennifer Courduff, Azusa Pacific University; Peter A. Hessling, North Carolina State University; Jean Kiekel, University of St. Thomas
  • “We Missed Teaching Inclusion”: The Perceived Impact of COVID-19 on Inclusive Extracurricular Activities – Margaret Mackin, University of Massachusetts – Boston; Staci Ballard, University of Massachusetts – Boston; Holly Jacobs, University of Massachusetts – Boston; Afrina Rohani, University of Massachusetts – Boston; Key Duckworth, University of Massachusetts – Boston
  • What Have We Learned? Assistive Technology/Augmentative and Alternative Communication Implementation During COVID-19 – Jennifer Courduff, Azusa Pacific University; Amanda J Rockinson-Szapkiw, University of Memphis; HeeKap Lee, Azusa Pacific University; Jessica Herring Watson, University of Central Arkansas

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to catch this session because I was at the one I previously blogged about.  While the AERA app had this session listed as the fourth one, the presenters at the roundtable appear to have presented in a different order – potentially the one from above which comes from the All Academic website that AERA also uses (the same thing happened with the last session, which I only caught by luck).  This is a good example of another one of the problems here at AERA.  I’ve mentioned the issues with the wifi, which are completely unacceptable for a hybrid conference.  But they have four different schedules.

While I haven’t searched on the program information/overview page or the PDF version, but I can tell you that they released the All Academic program first (which I set up my personal schedule based on).  Then several weeks later they released the app – which has really been promoted as the main option by AERA.  However, the app doesn’t speak with All Academic – so that schedule I created in All Academic did not populate into the app.

The bottom line is that the next set of presenters were already a third of the way through their session when I arrived.  One of the presenters gave me a copy of her personal notes and I’ll scan those in and add them below when I get back home.

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