Virtual School Meanderings

March 28, 2018

SITE 2018 – Instructional Design and Evaluation of Science Education to Improve Collaborative Problem Solving Skills

The twentieth session focused on K-12, distance, online, and/or blended learning that I am blogging from the 2018 Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education conference is:

Instructional Design and Evaluation of Science Education to Improve Collaborative Problem Solving Skills

ID: 52368Type: Brief Paper
  1. Li Chen, Kyushu University, Japan
  2. Hirokazu Uemura, Fukuoka Prefectural Itoshima High School, Japan
  3. Yoshiko Goda, Kumamoto University, Japan
  4. Fumiya Okubo, Yuta Taniguchi, Misato Oi, and Shin’ichi Konomi, Kyushu University, Japan
  5. Hiroaki Ogata, Kyoto University, Japan
  6. Masanori Yamada, Kyushu University, Japan

Wednesday, March 28 3:20-3:40 PM Location: Edison G

Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) skills are essential in education and in the 21st century workforce. CPS involves two main domains: the social domain (e.g., communication or cooperation) and the cognitive domain (e.g., domain-specific problem-solving strategies). As well as scientific knowledge, communication skills, problem-solving creativity, and motivation for learning and inquiry are also required in science education. In this article, a science lesson was designed and integrated with ICT for development of students’ CPS skills. We assessed changes in students’ CPS awareness, and acquisition of related knowledge, before and after the lesson. Results showed CPS awareness on the cognitive domain and acquisition of knowledge were significantly improved. We also examined correlations between students’ CPS awareness, knowledge acquisition, and learning motivation. The results showed significant correlation between students’ awareness of CPS and their acquisition of related knowledge.

Topics

The session was presented by Li Chen, who is a Master’s student at Kyushu University.  She began by focusing on the importance of science education within the Japanese education system and the role of Collaborative Problem Solving within the science curriculum.  The study itself was to evaluate the effectiveness of CPS within a senior high science class.

There were 36 students in this twelfth grade class.  Surveys and testing data (both utilizing a pre-course and post-course model) was collected from 27 students.  The research questions focused upon three areas: knowledge acquisition, awareness of the CPS model, and the relationship between the two.

The way the curriculum was structure integrated with what Li referred to at ICT, but with the use of Moodle as a learning management system what they were discussing was really an example of blended learning (see the below instructional model).


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In terms of the results, when it came to the knowledge acquisition, I captured the following slide:

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In terms of the awareness of the CPS model, I captured the following slides:

 
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(apologies for the blurriness)

Finally, with respect to the relationship between the two I captured the following slides:


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(apologies for the blurriness)


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The bottom line was that this instance of blended learning, using this CPS model, increased student knowledge and increased their awareness of the CPS model.  Finally, there was a statistically significant correlation between students’ improvement of CPS awareness and improved knowledge acquisition.

SITE 2018 – Field Experience in a K-12 Virtual School

The twenty-first and final session focused on K-12, distance, online, and/or blended learning on day two that I am blogging from the 2018 Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education conference is:

Field Experience in a K-12 Virtual School

ID: 51757Type: Roundtable
  1. Elizabeth Downs, Georgia Southern University, United States

Wednesday, March 28 3:00 PM-4:00 PM Location: Edison Ballroom D

This presentation will describe the experiences of 16 graduate students in an instructional technology online teaching and learning endorsement who completed a virtual field placement in a K-12 virtual school The graduate students in the course were certified teachers currently teaching in face-to-face K-12 classrooms The field experience is the final course in a three-course sequence for the online teaching and learning endorsement Prior to taking the field-placement course, students completed two three-hour courses focusing on the design and development of online courses The online field placement was a 15-week experience in a fully online high school classes Each of the interning graduate students was paired with an experienced mentor teacher in the virtual school K-12 school

Topics

Unfortunately, they have two relevant sessions scheduled against one another in this time slot, so I am in another room.  However, I would encourage anyone attending this session to please post any notes you may have below.

SITE 2018 – What’s Happening in Blended and Online Learning: Innovative Practice and Lessons Learned

The nineteenth session focused on K-12, distance, online, and/or blended learning that I am blogging from the 2018 Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education conference is:

What’s Happening in Blended and Online Learning: Innovative Practice and Lessons Learned

ID: 51877Type: Panel
  1. Susan Poyo, Franciscan University, United States
  2. Leanna Archambault, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, United States
  3. Jayme Linton, Lenoir-Rhyne University, United States
  4. Jean Kiekel, University of St. Thomas, United States
  5. David Schouweiler, Lenoir-Rhyne University, United States
  6. Kathryn Kennedy, Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute, United States

Wednesday, March 28 1:45 PM-2:45 PM Location: Edison B

This panel brings kindred spirits from the field of education to explore and discuss innovative practices targeting both blended and online learning The increase of blended and online courses in K-12 and higher education requires the addition of pre-service and licensed teachers who are amenable and equipped to instruct in a rapidly transforming environment However, there is evidence of a lack of response, particularly in teacher preparation programs, to the changes in current educational practices and policies in online education and the need for online instructors (Kennedy and Archambault, 2012, 2016; Gemin, Ryan, Vashaw, and Watson, 2015; Compton and Davis, 2010; NEA, nd) Experts in the field will examine new and innovative practices implemented to support the development of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) necessary for successful blended and online learning

Topics

Leanna began the session by providing an overview that I suspect was largely informed by the MVLRI report at http://media.mivu.org/institute/pdf/examinete2016.pdf.

Susan then discussed a course, EDU 366 Preparing Educators for Virtual Contexts, that they have at Franciscan University of Steubenville; as well as an opportunity to undertake half of their student teaching at Buckeye Online School for Success.

Next, Jayme spoke of the Graduate Certificate in Online Teaching and Instructional Design at Lenoir-Rhyne University.  The program is based around the iNACOL Blended Learning Teacher Competency Framework, and is a 18 credit hour certificate that can be used towards a 30 credit hour Master’s in the same topic.  The program has leveraged an existing bridge program option at the university that allows senior undergraduate students to enroll in dual credit options that can be counted both towards their undergraduate degree and a graduate degree program.  The certificate is four courses and a six credit hour practicum at the North Carolina Virtual Public School.

This was followed by Jean, who focused her part of the presentation about the lessons that she learned as an online teacher with the Virtual High School (now VHS Collaborative) that she still applies when teaching online now at her current university.

Finally, Kathryn concluded the session focusing on the Changing Roles of Educators reports that the MVLRI has been publishing in Michigan.

SITE 2018 – Design and Evaluate a Forensic Science Online Course for High School Students of Color

The eighteenth session focused on K-12, distance, online, and/or blended learning that I am blogging from the 2018 Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education conference is:

Design and Evaluate a Forensic Science Online Course for High School Students of Color

ID: 52097Type: Best Practices
  1. Doug Elrick, Jiaqi Yu, and Constance Hargrave, Iowa State University, United States

Wednesday, March 28 11:30-11:45 AM Location: Edison A

The design and development of innovative online STEM educational materials that effectively engage learners in non-traditional classroom settings is a pragmatic way to cultivate STEM career interests of precollege students of color as well as their self-efficacy. This study focused on the design and evaluation of an online forensic science course that included hands-on practical exercises offered to high school students of color in the Midwest. Major issues emerging from our design and development process and highlighted evaluation results are introduced in this paper to picture how we provided a STEM content-rich, self-directed, informal learning environment that effectively engaged students. We aim to share our best practices on course design and evaluation to inform educators working in similar contexts to improve their own online courses.

Topics

The course was situated within a university-based outreach program focused on high school students of color and STEM disciplines.  The course in question was a 40-hour, self-directed course on forensic science.  The course itself was based on the Next Generation Science Standards, in particular biological and physics science standards.  There were two types of practical exercises: online simulations and hands-on labs that were suitable for unsupervised home use.  The course was designed using the R2D2 instructional design model.  There were six lessons, with each one having a consistent model: reading, reflection (i.e., writing), doing, and then displaying (i.e., showing their work).  As the course was self-paced, it also included gaming features to keep students motivated.  For example, there was a leader board that showed student progress and badges that students could earn.

In terms of student knowledge, on the pre-test of content knowledge the students scored an average of 55.56.  However, for the post-test the student average was 103.89.  Below is an image I took of the slide that had the student perception data from the pre-course survey, the post-course survey, and student interviews.


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As well, two images of the slide that focused on implications or findings for design of the course.


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This occurrence was the first time that this course had been offered online during the summer to these students.  So this was an initial offering, with the first formal evaluation of the online course.

 

SITE 2018 – Part 2: Symposium on Research in K-12 Online and Blended Learning

The seventeenth session focused on K-12, distance, online, and/or blended learning that I am blogging from the 2018 Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education conference is:

Part 2: Symposium on Research in K-12 Online and Blended Learning

ID: 53142Type: Symposium
  1. Kathryn Kennedy, Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute, United States
  2. Rick Ferdig, Kent State University, United States
  3. Jered Borup, George Mason University, United States
  4. Anissa Lokey-Vega, Kennesaw State University, United States
  5. Leanna Archambault, Arizona State University, United States
  6. Amy Garrett Dikkers, University of North Carolina @ Wilmington, United States
  7. Kerry Rice, Boise State University, United States
  8. Tina Heafner, University of North Carolina Charlotte, United States

Wednesday, March 28 11:30 AM-12:30 PM Location: Wright

The second edition of The Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning has just been published and is an edited collection of chapters that presents the current state of research in K-12 online and blended learning Updated every three to five years, the Handbook is made up of three sections The beginning chapters lay the groundwork of the historical, international, and political landscape as well as present the scope of research methodologies used Subsequent sections share a synthesis of theoretical and empirical work describing where we have been, what we currently know, and where we hope to go with research in the areas of learning and learners, content domains, teaching, the role of the other, and technological innovations This volume attempts to synthesize existing research; in doing so, it will act as an important resource for those interested in this topic However, there are always new studies, concepts, and domains within K-12 online and blended learning Each section includes potential new areas for growth in understanding practice, policy, and research This symposium will be made up of a panel of the 2018 Handbook authors

Topic

Unfortunately, they have two relevant sessions scheduled against one another in this time slot, so I am in another room.  However, I would encourage anyone attending this session to please post any notes you may have below.

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