Virtual School Meanderings

February 3, 2016

University Of Virginia Researchers Need Your Help…

From Monday’s inbox…

Online Learning Consortium -      
University of Virginia researchers need your help… email_icon_leadership_100x100.png
Dear Colleague,

Little is known about how much training virtual instructors receive, the nature of that training and the degree to which it’s successful. This survey begins to address these important questions. We’d like your help in answering them.

We’re a team of educators and professionals from the University of Virginia and Stevens Institute of Technology with broad experience with online learning, and we believe knowledge of the kind of training our colleagues have received will help academics and administrators shape more effective training programs going forward.

The literature on distance learning contains thousands of articles about the transition to online learning. Very few focus on the specific challenges posed by synchronous virtual learning environments. Even fewer investigate the extent, type and quality of training instructors receive before entering a virtual synchronous classroom.

We would appreciate your taking about 15 minutes to complete this survey. Your responses will be confidential and no responses will ever be reported individually. All data will be reported in the aggregate. The University of Virginia’s Institutional Review Board has reviewed this project for the Social Sciences, project #2015-0455-00.

survey button.png

We thank you for your help. We also think you will find the survey interesting to complete. As an added incentive, at the close of the survey, you will have the option of entering a drawing for four Amazon.com gift cards valued at $50 each. Questions about the project can be addressed to Glenn Kessler, Principal Investigator, at gpk2n@virginia.edu.

Sincere thanks,
Glenn Kessler, Ph.D.
University of Virginia

Kathryn F. Wood, Ph.D.
University of Virginia

Michele Lewski, Ph.D.
Stevens Institute of Technology

Jennifer Withrow
Align Virtual Learning Solutions

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This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com from noreply@onlinelearningconsortium.org.

The Online Learning Consortium | P.O. Box 1238 | Newburyport | MA | 01950

January 29, 2016

Attention Authors: Get More Citations to Your Work

From Monday’s inbox…  Good advice for all scholars!!!

Online Learning Consortium  
Help us Spread the Word about OLJ!
Dear Michael,

The editors of OLJ would like to encourage you to promote your article on other research sites. This is perfectly appropriate given that OLJ is an open access journal.

More citations are good for you, the author, as it builds your credibility and name-recognition in the field and certainly helps when you go up for tenure and/or promotion. OLJ benefits, too, as the more your article is cited, the more the journal is recognized as a source of quality research among researchers and practitioners. So we both benefit when your article is widely cited.

Here are some options for promoting your article for you to consider:

If doing this intrigues you and you’d like to learn more about these systems, here is an article that compares ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and other sites: Academic Networks Contest: ResearchGate v Academia.edu.

And here is some research that compares articles in Academia.edu to articles not available online: Open Access Meets Discoverability: Citations to Articles Posted to Academia.edu.

A paper uploaded to Academia.edu has 41% more citations after one year, 50% more after three years, and 73% more after five years.

One last tip – please also consider creating an account on Google Scholar. You can use this site to monitor citations to your research.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katrina Meyers, Associate Editor, Online Learning
Dr. Peter Shea, Editor, Online Learning

P.S. We will also be scheduling a webinar on this topic in the months ahead – stay tuned for more details!

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The Online Learning Consortium | P.O. Box 1238 | Newburyport | MA | 01950

January 1, 2016

Article Notice: Book Review: Online, Blended, and Distance Education – Building Successful Programs in Schools (Online Learning)

As I mentioned on Monday, I’m posting notice of the articles from the Online Learning 19:5 K-12 Online Learning Research Special Issue.

Book Review: Online, Blended, and Distance Education: Building Successful Programs in Schools

Anne Roycroft, EdD
Fuel Education

Editors: Tom Clark and Michael Barbour. (2015). Online, Blended, and Distance Education: Building Successful Programs in Schools. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing. 239 pages. ISBN: 978-1-62036-163-4 (cloth)

December 31, 2015

Article Notice: Book Review – Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning (Online Learning)

As I mentioned on Monday, I’m posting notice of the articles from the Online Learning 19:5 K-12 Online Learning Research Special Issue.

Book Review: Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning

Diane Mayse,PhD
Blended Learning Data Manager (Nexus Academies)
Connections Education

Editors: Richard E. Ferdig and Kathryn Kennedy (2014). Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning. Pages: 540. Published by ETC Press. ISBN: 978-1-312-58708-3. The online version is available for no charge at http://press.etc.cmu.edu/content/handbook-research-k-12-online-and-blendedlearning-0. The printed version is $33.95.

Article Notice: Parent and Student Perceptions of Parent Engagement at a Cyber Charter High School (Online Learning)

As I mentioned on Monday, I’m posting notice of the articles from the Online Learning 19:5 K-12 Online Learning Research Special Issue.

Parent and Student Perceptions of Parent Engagement at a Cyber Charter High School

Jered Borup and Mark A. Stevens
George Mason University

Lisa Hasler Waters
Flint Hill School, VA

Abstract – As enrollments in cyber charter schools grow, it becomes increasingly important to understand how parents engage in their students’ learning. Researchers have hypothesized that parental engagement is even more critical when online students learn from home, but few researchers have examined parents’ engagement behavior—especially parents of adolescent learners. In this case study we addressed this gap using parent and student interviews at a full-time online charter school. Our analysis of 19 interviews with 9 parents and 10 interviews with 10 students identified five primary types of parental engagement within this setting: (1) nurturing relationships and interactions, (2) advising and mentoring, (3) organizing, (4) monitoring and motivating student engagement, and (5) instructing. We also identified obstacles to effective parental engagement, and in this paper we discuss how programs can work with parents to foster more collaborative relationships.

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