Virtual School Meanderings

October 4, 2019

[Special Report] Why Ed Tech Is Not Used And What to Do About It

This is an interesting perspective…

SPECIAL REPORT: WHY ED TECH IS NOT USED AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT

Report after report cites low usage rates for educational software, a problem driven largely by districts and schools not thinking through how an ed-tech product or service should be used before buying it. Complicating matters is the fact that there is no clear consensus on just what constitutes a “good” usage rate. Is it 25 percent, 50 percent, or 100 percent? Making sure the right students are using the right product at the right time is also a big challenge.

This special report is the first in a series of three special reports for the 2019-20 school year that Education Week is producing for K-12 ed-tech leaders. The report offers expert advice on how to improve the use of educational technology, a case study on one company’s failed effort to help districts track ed-tech usage, actionable insights about breaking through the barriers to good educational technology use, and lessons learned on how to save money by making some tough decisions about the applications and programs educators use.

I say this is interesting because it makes the assumption that the use of educational software is good pedagogy, and places the blame on school districts (and to a lesser extent teachers) for not using this educational software.  Of course it has nothing to do with the fact that maybe the use of educational software is just bad pedagogy.  Of course it has nothing to do with districts’ concerns with the overuse of simply placing students in front of flickering screens – or of the privacy concerns that come with the amount of student data that many of these software packages keep on its users.  No, its because school districts and teachers haven’t been trained to use the software properly or that teachers are resistant to change.

Anyway, the full message I received read…

EducationWeek®
 Special Report:
Managing the Money
View the Education Week special report, Why Ed Tech Is Not Used and What to Do About It online now.
Why Ed Tech Is Not Used and What to Do About It offers expert advice on how to improve the use of educational technology, and how to make sure the right students are using the right product at the right time. Subscribe so you can read the full report, and get complete access to all of Education Week.
Ed-Tech Usage Levels Are Low: What Should Schools Do?
Evaluating how much students and teachers are using ed-tech products and services is tricky, complicated, and oftentimes confusing. But it can be done.
READ MORE  
Austin CTO Kevin Schwartz Speaks: 5 Ed-Tech Problems and Solutions
The Austin tech chief talks about helping educators avoid common mistakes, pumping up usage levels for ed-tech tools, getting tech and curriculum folks to talk to each other, and more.
READ MORE  
Case Study: Clever’s Troubled Effort to Help Schools Track Ed-Tech Use
The idea was to give educators and administrators a single place to look across multiple learning tools at two simple metrics: how much time did students spend using each program, and how much progress did they make?
READ MORE  
Enjoy the complete reporting provided in Why Ed Tech Is Not Used and What to Do About ItSubscribe to Education Week for more in-depth special reports and daily K-12 news. Enjoy unlimited digital access from every device when you subscribe today!For college/university version: Find out how your entire campus can benefit from premium digital access with an Education Week site license.

Feel free to forward this to your colleagues and let them know about this new special report.

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Editorial Projects in Education Inc., 6935 Arlington Road, Suite 100, Bethesda, MD 20814. EPE is the independent, nonprofit publisher of Education Week and other high-quality print and online products on K-12 education. Copyright © 2019 Editorial Projects in Education. 

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September 22, 2019

Advancing Literacy, Emerging Bilinguals, Digital Peer Learning

Note the digital learning item below.

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To explore the rest of our sponsor’s whitepapers, visit the current collection here.
The content of these whitepapers is from our sponsors and is not written by Education Week nor any of its affiliates.

Editorial Projects in Education, Inc., 6935 Arlington Road, Suite 100, Bethesda, MD  20814. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Projects in Education.

September 15, 2019

Get Even More Out Of Education Week

While I am not advocating a subscription to Education Week (although they do have some great reporting), I wanted to post this to highlight the personalized learning report near the bottom of the page.

Advance your professional learning by subscribing to Education Week.
Advance your professional learning by subscribing to Education Week.

Keep reading!

K-12 education is dynamic. The best way to keep up with the fast pace of change—to classroom practice, curriculum, technology, and policy—is to be a regular reader of Education Week.

As a subscriber, you’ll have this vast resource at your fingertips—over 42 new stories per week, and more than 115,000 in the archives—to help you with your next challenge and provide you with needed inspiration.  Get print + premium digital to have issues delivered to you, plus full online access. Or choose premium digital for total access from any device.

Subscribe today, and keep reading!

Print + Premium Digital Premium Digital

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Advance your professional learning every day with a subscription.  The BEST VALUEis only $39 for PRINT + PREMIUM DIGITAL.  You don’t want the paper? Go PREMIUM DIGITAL for just $35.

Editorial Projects in Education Inc., 6935 Arlington Road, Suite 100, Bethesda, MD 20814. EPE is the independent, nonprofit publisher of Education Week and other high-quality print and online products on K-12 education. Copyright © 2019 Editorial Projects in Education. 

September 8, 2019

Effective Questioning, Digital Peer Learning, Educational Equity

Note the digital learning item below.

Download free copies of whitepapers containing insights and thought leadership from our sponsors.

Effective Questioning Practices to Spur Thinking
Provided by Mentoring Minds | Read Whitepaper Now

Increased Social Connectedness Through Digital Peer Learning
Provided by Instructure | Read Whitepaper Now

Digital Ecosystems Support Educational Equity
Provided by itslearning | Read Whitepaper Now

Accelerate Student Writing Proficiency and Progress With Simple, Effective Feedback 
Provided by Texthelp | Read Whitepaper Now

Effective Social-Emotional Learning for the Next Generation of Leaders
Provided by Visionaria | Read Whitepaper Now

Response to Intervention Centered on Student Learning 
Provided by Solution Tree | Read Whitepaper Now

The EdTech Efficacy Handbook 
Provided by Dreambox | Read Whitepaper Now

To explore the rest of our sponsor’s whitepapers, visit the current collection here.
The content of these whitepapers is from our sponsors and is not written by Education Week nor any of its affiliates.

Editorial Projects in Education, Inc., 6935 Arlington Road, Suite 100, Bethesda, MD  20814. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Projects in Education.

June 10, 2019

Press Release: CREDO At Stanford University Finds Limited Improvement In Charter School Impact In Ohio

This is the second of three entries that was referenced about thirty minutes ago (see here).  If you haven’t looked at that first entry, I would STRONGLY encourage that you do for a brief primer on some of the methodological issues.

CREDO at Stanford University Finds Limited Improvement In Charter School Impact In Ohio

CREDO releases a new report examining the impact of Ohio Charter Schools from 2013-2017

STANFORD, Calif. – Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO), found that the typical charter school student in Ohio makes similar progress in reading and weaker growth in math compared to their traditional public school peer (TPS).

“The performance in Ohio charter schools has been consistent since our initial investigation in 2009. We intend to continue to study the impact of the bipartisan legislation HB2 and other policies,” said Margaret Raymond, Director of CREDO at Stanford University. “We continue to be grateful for our long-term partnership with the Ohio Department of Education to provide impartial analysis.”

Key Findings

  • This report provides evidence for charter students’ performance in Ohio over four years, beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and ending in 2016-2017.
  • In Ohio, there are both online and brick-and-mortar charters. Our investigation revealed remarkably weaker growth in both reading and math among online charter students relative to the average TPS students or brick-and-mortar charter students. In fact, as CREDO has found in other states, it is the poor performance of online charter schools that drags down the overall charter impact on student academic growth.
  • Greater academic progress is found for charter black students, including black students in poverty for reading, but not among other subgroups.
  • At the school level, around 34 percent of Ohio charter schools outpace their local TPS peers in learning in reading and 29 percent in math. Still, 14 percent of charter schools have results that are significantly worse than TPS peers for reading and 32 percent of charter schools are underperforming in math relative to their local TPS peers.

To download a copy of the full report, visit: http://credo.stanford.edu

About CREDO at Stanford University CREDO at Stanford University produces rigorous, non-partisan research and evaluation to enhance the body of empirical evidence, driving education policy decisions toward improved education outcomes for all students.

Note the portions I have highlighted in red that would be of interest to readers of this space.

The direct link to the report is available at:

http://credo.stanford.edu/pdfs/OH_state_report_2019.pdf

Again, another result that confirms findings in a report released in the past two weeks by the National Education Policy Center (of which I am a co-author).

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