Virtual School Meanderings

October 16, 2015

OLC 2015 – The Layman’s Guide to Creating Interactive Videos for Online Learning

The twenty-fourth, and final session that I am blogging from the K-12 online teaching and learning track at the Online Learning Consortium‘s International Conference from 14-16 October 2015 in Orlando, Florida is:

October 16, 2015 – 11:45am
Lead Presenter: Daniella Smith (University of North Texas & College of Information, USA)
Track: Technology and Emerging Learning Environments
Information Session
Location: Oceanic 1
Session: Concurrent Session 11
Session Duration: 45 Minutes
Abstract:

This presentation discusses free tools and tips for creating engaging online interactive video lessons with assessments. Websites for creating and locating videos are included.

As this session occurred at the same time as one of the other K-12 track sessions, I don’t have notes for this one (as I’m in the other room).

OLC 2015 – The Early College Experience in the Digital Age

The twenty-third session that I am blogging from the K-12 online teaching and learning track at the Online Learning Consortium‘s International Conference from 14-16 October 2015 in Orlando, Florida is:

October 16, 2015 – 11:45am
Lead Presenter: Jill Buban (Online Learning Consortium, USA)
Track: Learning Effectiveness
Information Session
Location: Northern Hemisphere A3
Session: Concurrent Session 11
Session Duration: 45 Minutes
Abstract:

This presentation will discuss the next generation of early-college programs, the need for these program to evolve, and effective delivery of such programs.

As this session occurred at the same time as one of the other K-12 track sessions, I don’t have notes for this one (as I’m in the other room).

OLC 2015 – Open Educational Resource Use in the K-12 Context

The twenty-second session that I am blogging from the K-12 online teaching and learning track at the Online Learning Consortium‘s International Conference from 14-16 October 2015 in Orlando, Florida is:

Open Educational Resource Use in the K-12 Context
October 16, 2015 – 11:45am
Lead Presenter: Hope Kelly (University of Florida, USA)
Track: Open, Global, Mobile
Information Session
Location: Asia 1
Session: Concurrent Session 11
Session Duration: 45 Minutes
Abstract:

This session will discuss the development of an instrument designed to identify trends in open educational resource (OER) use identified among K-12 teachers.

As this session occurred at the same time as one of the other K-12 track sessions, I don’t have notes for this one (as I’m in the other room).

OLC 2015 – Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment and Turnover Intention of K12 Online Teachers

The twenty-first session that I am blogging from the K-12 online teaching and learning track at the Online Learning Consortium‘s International Conference from 14-16 October 2015 in Orlando, Florida is:

October 16, 2015 – 10:45am
Lead Presenter: Ingle Larkin (Kennesaw State University & Cobb County School District, USA)
Anissa Lokey-Vega (Kennesaw State University & Bagwell College of Education, USA)
Track: Faculty and Professional Development & Support
Information Session
Location: Southern Hemisphere III
Session: Concurrent Session 10
Session Duration: 45 Minutes
Virtual Session

Abstract:

This mixed-methods study seeks to identify pressing factors influencing K-12 online teacher job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to stay or leave online education.

This session was actually a part of Ingle dissertation study.  She was interested in:

  1. What is the job satisfaction of online teachers?
  2. What are online teachers commitment to their online school?
  3. What are online teachers turnover intention?

The instrument was a slightly modified version of Bolinger’s higher education job satisfaction survey, and Meyer’s survey that measured intention to leave.  There were 110 participants from a single Southeastern state.

The online teachers had:

  • 74.0% satisfaction level
    • most satisfying
    • flexibility
    • technical training
    • timely support
    • student access
    • meeting student needs
    • least satisfying
    • high workload
    • documentation and data
    • curriculum and resources (ability to modify and supplement)
    • inactive/truant students
    • miss student contact
  • there was a high level of correlation between job satisfaction and mean affective, mean normative, and a negative correlation mean continuance
  • turnover intentions were varied based on 1 year, 5 year and career
    • there was a medium, but statistically significant, correlation between satisfaction and intent to stay
    • there was a 0.5
  • in terms of a predictive model
    • each additional student represented a 2.2% increase in the chance the teacher will stay
    • each additional point on the affordance scale (flexibility and convenience of teaching online) increased the chance the teacher would stay by 48.4%
    • those assigned a mentor increased the likelihood that they would stay for a minimum five years was 274%
    • each year of full-time teaching experience increased the likelihood to stay by 12.3%
    • there were about four or five other predictive aspects that I didn’t catch as I was typing

I have the be honest and say that the predictive figure for the mentor was quite eye opening!

 

OLC 2015 – An Efficacy Study of SmashFact

The twentieth session that I am blogging from the K-12 online teaching and learning track at the Online Learning Consortium‘s International Conference from 14-16 October 2015 in Orlando, Florida is:

October 16, 2015 – 10:45am
Lead Presenter: Britt Carr (Britt Carr Interactive Learning, USA)
Track: Learning Effectiveness
Vendor Showcase
Location: Europe 8
Session: Concurrent Session 10
Session Duration: 45 Minutes
Abstract:

Results and discussion of an efficacy study around a web-based tool teachers use to turn course content into a study apps.

As this session occurred at the same time as one of the other K-12 track sessions, I don’t have notes for this one (as I’m in the other room).

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