Virtual School Meanderings

December 13, 2017

Article Notice: Describing K-12 Online Teachers’ Online Professional Development Opportunities For Students With Disabilities

In yesterday’s entry [OLJ] New Online Learning Journal Issue Published, there was one K-12 focused article that I wanted to highlight today.

Describing K-12 online teachers’ online professional development opportunities for students with disabilities

Mary Frances Rice

 

Abstract

Online teacher professional development (oTPD) researchers have been concerned with design features, teacher change in practice, and student learning, as well as establishing guidelines for directing funding support. Even so, previous work suggests that high-quality instructional support for all SWD is still on the horizon. As a response to the need for better instruction, professional development for SWD has emerged in all settings, including teachers who are not just receiving oTPD, but who are online teachers themselves. The purpose of this study was to use online teachers’ descriptions of their oTPD for SWD to learn about the professional learning opportunities available to teachers around serving SWD and their families. Teachers and administrators from various online/virtual learning schools around the country participated in this study. Even though teachers had SWD in their courses and were directly responsible for SWD, most teachers and administrators described few professional development opportunities for learning to teach SWD in the online learning environment beyond giving and receiving information about legal compliance. However, there was some evidence that some teachers in some schools were supported in forming informal collaborative communities with the potential for developing promising practices for these students.

Keywords

students with disabilities, online teacher professional development, administrator and teacher perspectives

Full Text:

PDF

References

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v21i4.1274

December 12, 2017

[OLJ] New Online Learning Journal Issue Published

Note the K-12 online learning item below.

Dear Readers:

The latest issue of Online Learning features a special section of high quality papers presented at the American Education Research Association’s (AERA) 2017 Annual Conference.  Founded more than a century ago, AERA is the premier organization for educational research in the United States with more than 25,000 members, 12 divisions and numerous special interest groups.  The Association’s Special Interest Group on Online Teaching and Learning (SIG-OTL) is a multi- disciplinary community of scholars focused on the creation, use, and evaluation of online learning environments.    Through a collaboration between the Online Learning Consortium and AERA this issue highlights 11 papers selected from more than 100 original submissions to the SIG-OTL.

These papers include research on online collaboration from the perspectives of minority students and instructors, how perceptions of communities are influenced by course length and discussion facilitation, and on the relationship between self-reflection and achievement in online K-12 math courses. The issue also contains 6 articles from our regular submission process addressing vital issues related to online learning processes, motivation, satisfaction, and performance.

We invite you to review the issue here
https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj

Thanks for your continuing interest in Online Learning,

Peter

Peter Shea, PhD
Editor, Online Learning

Online Learning
Vol 21, No 4 (2017)
Table of Contents
https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj/issue/view/55

Special Conference Issue: AERA Online Teaching and Learning SIG
——–
INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL ISSUE SPOTLIGHTING PAPERS FROM THE AERA SPECIAL
INTEREST GROUP ON ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING
Karen Swan,     Jennifer Richardson
Online collaborative learning activities: The perspectives of minority
graduate students
Alex Kumi-Yeboah,       James Dogbey,   Guangji Yuan
Care, Communication, Support: Core for Designing Meaningful Online
Collaborative Learning
Heather A. Robinson,    Whitney Kilgore,        Scott J. Warren
Student Actions and Community in Online Courses: The Roles Played By Course
Length and Facilitation Method
Carrie Demmans Epp,     Krystle Phirangee,      Jim Hewitt
Self-Reflection and Math Performance in an Online Learning Environment
Jinnie Choi,    Alyssa Walters, Pat Hoge
Describing K-12 online teachers’ online professional development
opportunities for students with disabilities
Mary Frances Rice
Best Practices Framework for Online Faculty  Professional Development: A
Delphi Study
Sandra Coswatte Mohr,   Kaye Shelton
Examining Distance Learners in Hybrid Synchronous Instruction:  Successes
and Challenges
Enilda Romero-Hall,     Cristiane Rocha Vicentini
Hybrid Education: The Potential of Teaching and Learning with Robot-Mediated
Communication
Benjamin William Gleason,       Christine Greenhow
Live Synchronous Web Meetings in Asynchronous Online Courses:
Reconceptualizing Virtual Office Hours
Patrick R. Lowenthal,   Joanna C Dunlap,        Chareen Snelson
Wherefore Art Thou MOOC: Defining Massive Open Online Courses
Stephanie J Blackmon,   Claire H. Major
How Much Does Student Engagement with Videos and Forums in a MOOC Affect
Their Achievement?
Fernanda Cesar Bonafini,        Chungil Chae,   Eunsung Park,   Kathryn Weed Jablokow

Section II
——–
Introduction to Section II
Peter Shea
Student Predisposition to Instructor Feedback and Perceptions of Teaching
Presence Predict Motivation Toward Online Courses
Andrew William Cole,    Christopher Anderson,   Thomas Bunton,  Maura R.
Cherney,        Valerie Cronin Fisher,  Richard Draeger, Jr.,   Michelle
Featherston,    Laura Motel,    Kristine M. Nicolini,   Brittnie Peck,  Mike Allen
A Critical Analysis of Characteristics that Influence the Effect of
Instructor Discussion Interaction on Student Outcomes
Rebecca Simon Hoey
Pre- and inservice teacher satisfaction with online collaborative mentoring
for technology integration: Applying the Kano quality attributes
Helga Dorner,   Swapna Kumar
Correlation between Grades Earned and Time in Online Courses
Lin Carver,     Keya Muhkerjee, Robert Lucio
Navigating Turn-Taking and Conversational Repair in an Online Synchronous
Course
Yvonne Earnshaw
Thematic Patterns in International Blended Learning Literature, Research,
Practices, and Terminology
Kristian J Spring,      Charles R Graham

________________________________________________________________________
Online Learning (OLJ)
http://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj

September 7, 2017

New Issue of Online Learning [OLJ] Published

No K-12 distance, online and/or blended learning items that I could see.

Dear Readers,

We recently published a new issue (21:3) of Online Learning (OLJ).  This
special conference issue contains articles originally presented at the OLC
Accelerate and OLC Innovate annual meetings.  We invite you to review the
issue here:

https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj

Thank you to our guest editors, authors, reviewers, and the staff of OLC for
all their contributions and to you for your continuing interest in Online
Learning.

best regards,

Peter Shea

Peter Shea, PhD
Editor: Online Learning (OLJ)
Associate Provost for Online Education  &
Associate Professor, Educational Theory and Practice and CCI
University at Albany, State University of New York
ED 114, 1400 Washington Ave, Albany, NY 12222
pshea@albany.edu

Online Learning
Vol 21, No 3 (2017)
Table of Contents
https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj/issue/view/54

Introduction
——–
Introduction: Sept. 2017 Conference Issue
Anthony Picciano

Invited Papers / 2017 OLC Conference Special Issue
——–
Gap Analysis: An Innovative Look at Gateway Courses and Student Retention
Karen Swan,     William Bloemer,        Scott Day
Beyond Being There:  Practices that Establish Presence, Engage Students and
Influence Intellectual Curiosity in a Structured Online Learning Environment
Janice Marie Orcutt,    Laurie P Dringus
Student Perceptions of the Use of Multimedia for Online Course Communication
Laura Portolese,        Julie Bonner
Using Design-Based Research in Higher Education Innovation
Cristi Ford,    Darragh McNally,        Kate Ford
Understanding Faculty Use of the Learning Management System
Jason Rhode,    Stephanie Richter,      Peter Gowen,    Tracy Miller,   Cameron Wills
An Instructor Learning Analytics Implementation Model
Holly McKee
Blended Learning From Design to Evaluation:  International Case Studies of
Evidence-Based Practice
Prof. Norman D. Vaughan,        Aline Reali,    Stefan Stenbom, Marieta Jansen Van
Vuuren, David MacDonald
A Formative Case Evaluation for the Design of an Online Delivery Model
Providing Access to Study Abroad Activities
Wendy Howard,   Gino Perrotte,  Minyoung Lee,   Jenna Frisone
Improving Digital Library Experiences and Support with Online Research
Guides
Laura Brewer,   Holly Rick,     Karen A. Grondin

Section II
——–
Introduction to Section II,  Sept. ’17
Peter Shea
Revised Community of Inquiry: Examining Learning Presence in a Blended Mode
of Delivery
Jessica Pool,   Gerda Reitsma,  Dirk Van den Berg
Theories and Frameworks for Online Education:  Seeking an Integrated Model
Anthony G Picciano
Exploring Factors Related to Completion of an Online Undergraduate-Level
Introductory Statistics Course
Whitney Alicia Zimmerman,       Glenn Johnson
An examination of factors that impact the retention of online students at a
for-profit university
Chris Sorensen, Judy Donovan
Exploring Differences in Business Undergraduate Perceptions by Preferred
Classroom Delivery Mode
Gary Blau,      Rob Drennan, Jr.
Compensation Still Matters: Language Learning Strategies in the Third
Millennium ESL Learners
Karim Hajhashemi,       Alireza Shakarami,      Nerina Caltabiano

________________________________________________________________________
Online Learning (OLJ)
http://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj

June 9, 2017

Online Learning Consortium’s Call for Articles in the Online Learning Journal

Note this call for articles – which includes some focus on K-12 – that may be relevant to readers.

Good Morning,

The Online Learning Journal, formerly the Journal of Asynchronous Learning, wishes to invite the presenters at the 2017 AERA Annual meeting to publish in a special issue devoted to the Online Teaching and Learning Special Interest Group (OTL-SIG).  The Online Learning Journal (OLJ) is the Online Learning Consortium’s (OLC) scholarly journal providing readers with rigorous peer-reviewed research in a variety of educational contexts from k-12 to higher education in the US and internationally. The journal is currently in the midst of an extended effort to further develop quality and rigor in systematic inquiry in online learning in support of the larger mission of the Online Learning Consortium. OLC is the leading professional organization devoted to advancing quality online learning by providing professional development, instruction, best practice publications and guidance to educators, online learning professionals and organizations around the world.

About the Special Issue: Topics for the special issue include but are not limited to research on:

  • Strategies for student engagement
  • Virtual or online K-12 schools
  • Community of Inquiry, including Social Presence, Teaching Presence and Cognitive Presence
  • Online Interaction (e.g. Instructor, peer-to-peer)
  • MOOCs
  • Strategies for online discussions
  • Online group work
  • Blended learning and flipped classrooms
  • Integration of tools for online learning environments
  • Retention in online courses and programs
  • Instructor readiness
  • Designing for the online environment
  • Assessment strategies and issues

Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research articles are welcome.

Submission Guidelines

If you would like to be considered for inclusion in the Special Issue, please complete the following form: https://goo.gl/forms/G7Pks01ckV4Nc71x2 .

  • Then, please submit manuscripts through the Open Journal System (OJS), the OLC journal system. Please select the Special Conference Issue: AERA Online Teaching and Learning SIG within the OJS submission process.
  • Author Guidelines include general APA Style 6th edition except for single-spacing requirement. Papers should be about 6,000-8,000 words. The Guide for Authors can be found here: http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/guide-authors/
  • For detailed assistance with APA style, refer to Purdue Online Writing Lab: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
  • Please note that contributors will also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Preliminary Timeline:

  • Intention to submit June 20th
    • send author and contact information, abstract from AERA presentation or updated abstract
  • Invited authors notified June 16-30th
  • Submission of full manuscript through the OLC journal system July 31st
  • Send out manuscripts for review on Aug 1st-4th
  • Return to editors on August 28th
  • Feedback from special issue editors on Sept 8th
  • Revised articles due back to editors by September 25th
  • Send manuscripts for copyediting on October 15 (absolute last day to be included)
  • Special Issue published December 15th (anticipated)

 

*Final acceptance notifications will not be delivered until after revised manuscripts have been submitted.

Special Issue Editors:

Dr. Jennifer C. Richardson (jennrich@purdue.edu)
Dr. Karen Swan (kswan4@uis.edu)
Marquetta Strait (straitm@purdue.edu)

Attachment: OLC Call for Articles from Online Teaching and Learning SIG_2017

January 29, 2016

Attention Authors: Get More Citations to Your Work

From Monday’s inbox…  Good advice for all scholars!!!

Online Learning Consortium  
Help us Spread the Word about OLJ!
Dear Michael,

The editors of OLJ would like to encourage you to promote your article on other research sites. This is perfectly appropriate given that OLJ is an open access journal.

More citations are good for you, the author, as it builds your credibility and name-recognition in the field and certainly helps when you go up for tenure and/or promotion. OLJ benefits, too, as the more your article is cited, the more the journal is recognized as a source of quality research among researchers and practitioners. So we both benefit when your article is widely cited.

Here are some options for promoting your article for you to consider:

If doing this intrigues you and you’d like to learn more about these systems, here is an article that compares ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and other sites: Academic Networks Contest: ResearchGate v Academia.edu.

And here is some research that compares articles in Academia.edu to articles not available online: Open Access Meets Discoverability: Citations to Articles Posted to Academia.edu.

A paper uploaded to Academia.edu has 41% more citations after one year, 50% more after three years, and 73% more after five years.

One last tip – please also consider creating an account on Google Scholar. You can use this site to monitor citations to your research.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katrina Meyers, Associate Editor, Online Learning
Dr. Peter Shea, Editor, Online Learning

P.S. We will also be scheduling a webinar on this topic in the months ahead – stay tuned for more details!

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The Online Learning Consortium | P.O. Box 1238 | Newburyport | MA | 01950

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