Virtual School Meanderings

September 20, 2019

Article Notice: A Systematic Approach To Improving E-Learning Implementations In High Schools

This isn’t a new article, but I only came across it late this past week (so I guess it was new to me).

TOJET: The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology – July 2014, volume 13 issue 3

A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO IMPROVING E-LEARNING IMPLEMENTATIONS IN HIGH SCHOOLS

Bens Pardamean and Teddy Suparyanto Graduate Program of Information Technology, Bina Nusantara University, Indonesia bpardamean@binus.edu

ABSTRACT This study was based on the current growing trend of implementing e-learning in high schools. Most endeavors have been inefficient, rendering an objective of determining the initial steps that could be taken to improve these efforts by assessing a student population’s computer skill levels and performances in an IT course. Demographic factors were also taken into account while formulating these recommendations. Basic computer skill levels were measured through the administration of the Technical Survival Skill Test (TSST) questionnaire, developed by the University of Toronto. Academic performances were evaluated through several assignments designed by the IT course instructors. The main result of this study indicated that computer skill levels did have a direct correlation with a student’s academic performance level. The database was further parsed based on demographical factors, resulting in a set of recommendations to enhance the effectiveness of e-learning.

Keywords: learning management system, LMS, technical survival skill test, TSST

July 18, 2019

Tuesday Newsday – Madonna University

It seems one of the co-authors of an article I recently published has had it featured in one of his institutional outlets.

[STUFF DELETED]

A Weekly Newsletter for Madonna University Employees                                              July 16, 2019

 

Education Adjunct Gets Published

Jason Siko, adjunct faculty member for the College of Education, had an article published in the Journal of Catholic Education, along with several co-authors.  The article, titled, Schism or Communion? A Discussion of the Morality of Online Learning through a Christian/Catholic Lens, is a rebuttal of Catholic scholar Jonathan Malesic’s criticism of online learning as being contrary to Catholic teachings on learning and the relationship between teacher and student.

In the Journal’s 22-year history, this is the first time a Madonna faculty member has had an article published in it.

The open-access article can be found by clicking here.

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Have an item for Tuesday Newsday? Submit your news, photos and events to marketing@madonna.edu by Friday at
5 p.m.

Plan ahead and provide event information at least two weeks in advance.

Madonna University: Our degrees change lives.

July 12, 2019

Jason Siko – New Articles

An item from one of my open scholarship networks.

[PDF] Schism or Communion? A Discussion of the Morality of Online Learning through a Christian/Catholic Lens

MK Barbour, JP Siko, M Beadle, G Bitgood – 2019
Distance education has been a formal part of the educational process for well over a
century (Moore, 2013), although some may argue that it began during the first
century with Paul’s letters on issues of doctrine to the various Christian communities …
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This alert is sent by Google Scholar. Google Scholar is a service by Google.

July 10, 2019

New Articles In My Profile

An item from one of my open scholarship networks.

[PDF] Schism or Communion? A Discussion of the Morality of Online Learning through a Christian/Catholic Lens

MK Barbour, JP Siko, M Beadle, G Bitgood – 2019
Distance education has been a formal part of the educational process for well over a
century (Moore, 2013), although some may argue that it began during the first
century with Paul’s letters on issues of doctrine to the various Christian communities …
Twitter Facebook

 

This alert is sent by Google Scholar. Google Scholar is a service by Google.

July 8, 2019

Article Notice – Schism or Communion? A Discussion of the Morality of Online Learning through a Christian/Catholic Lens

Note this article that I recently published in the Journal of Catholic Education.

Michael K. BarbourTouro University California
Jason Paul SikoMadonna University
Mark BeadleSevenstar Academy
Greg Bitgood, Karmidable LLC

Abstract – While massive open online courses (MOOCs) garnered plenty of attention at the beginning of the decade, initial findings about their value have been disappointing. In particular, only a narrow range of participants appear to be successful in completing and passing these unmonitored courses: white, educated, affluent males. One prominent Catholic scholar, Jonathan Malesic, went as far as saying that the very nature of MOOCs does not align with Catholic teachings of learning through social interaction, adapting to the needs of the learner, and teaching (i.e., successfully) the masses. Further, by extension, he applied these criticisms to online learning in general. This article examines these criticisms, describes how these problems are present in K-12 online learning, and gives examples of how these issues are mitigated. The article concludes with ideas for using the online learning medium to promote Catholic and Christian values.
DOI – 10.15365/joce.2201092019
First Page – 249
Last Page – 276
Creative Commons LicenseCreative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
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