Virtual School Meanderings

April 17, 2018

AERA 2018 – Impact of the Algebra Nation Tutoring Program on the Performance of Students Who Retake the End-of-Course Exam

As I mentioned earlier in the week, the 2018 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association has been happening over the last few days. The fourteenth blog entry related to K-12 online learning session from AERA 2018 that I am posting is:

Impact of the Algebra Nation Tutoring Program on the Performance of Students Who Retake the End-of-Course Exam

In Poster Session: Research on Online Instruction
Tue, April 17, 10:35am to 12:05pm, New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Americas Hall 1-2 – Exhibit Hall

Abstract – High failure rates mean many students must repeat Algebra, yet passing rates for repeaters remain low. Online tutoring may be a useful resource for these students. The present analysis examines the impact of Algebra Nation, a free online tutoring platform, on the performance of students who failed the end-of-course (EOC) exam the previous year. Results indicate that higher use of Algebra Nation was associated with greater EOC gains, particularly for students most at risk for repeated failure.

Authors
Walter L. Leite, University of Florida
Carole R. Beal, University of Florida
Anne Corinne Huggins-Manley, University of Florida
Zachary Kendall Collier, University of Florida
Dee Duygu Cetin-Berber, University of Florida

As this was a poster session, I took pictures of the poster.


Click on any image for a larger version.

AERA 2018 – A Latent Class Analysis on Student Journey Through an Online Course

As I mentioned earlier in the week, the 2018 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association has been happening over the last few days. The thirteenth blog entry related to K-12 online learning session from AERA 2018 that I am posting is:

A Latent Class Analysis on Student Journey Through an Online Course

In Poster Session: Research on Online Instruction
Tue, April 17, 10:35am to 12:05pm, New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Americas Hall 1-2 – Exhibit Hall

Abstract – This purpose of this study was to identify similarities and dissimilarities among 210 students enrolled in an online course. Conducting latent class analysis on learning management systems (LMS) data which measured course performance and course engagement over time, the researchers found three statistically different subgroups, while one of them appeared to be more at-risk than the others. This study has implications for course facilitators or instructors who need to recognize such students and provide timely intervention.

Authors
Peiyi Lin, Teachers College, Columbia University
Susan Lowes, Teachers College, Columbia University

These presenters did not show up.

AERA 2018 – Exploring Factors That Promote Online Learning Experiences and Academic Self-Concept of Minority High School Students

As I mentioned earlier in the week, the 2018 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association has been happening over the last few days. The twelfth blog entry related to K-12 online learning session from AERA 2018 that I am posting is:

Exploring Factors That Promote Online Learning Experiences and Academic Self-Concept of Minority High School Students

In Continuous Improvement of Students’ Online Learning Experiences
Tue, April 17, 10:35am to 12:05pm, New York Marriott Marquis, Fifth Floor, Westside Ballroom Salon 4

Abstract – In this study, we examined factors that promote/hinder the learning experiences and academic self-concept of minority high school students in an online. Qualitative interviews were conducted with twenty-four African American, and sixteen Hispanic high school students. The results showed that collaborative learning activities, access to resources, time convenience, student-teacher interactions, student-student interactions, improved academic behavior, and parental support helped to enhance online learning experiences and academic self-concept of the minority students. On the contrary, the lack of social presence, and the lack of cultural inclusion in course content constrain online learning experiences and academic self-concept of the students. Implications for teaching minority high school students in online environment, as well as suggestions for future research are provided.

Authors
Alex Kumi-Yeboah, University at Albany – SUNY
James Dogbey, Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi

These presenters did not show up – at least not by the half way point of the session (and the other three had).  So I hightailed it over to one of the other hotels to catch the posters.

AERA 2018 – Enrollment, Performance, and Course Engagement of Credit Recovery Students in Virtual Courses

As I mentioned earlier in the week, the 2018 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association has been happening over the last few days. The eleventh blog entry related to K-12 online learning session from AERA 2018 that I am posting is:

Enrollment, Performance, and Course Engagement of Credit Recovery Students in Virtual Courses

In Continuous Improvement of Students’ Online Learning Experiences
Tue, April 17, 10:35am to 12:05pm, New York Marriott Marquis, Fifth Floor, Westside Ballroom Salon 4

Abstract – The author examined enrollment, performance, and course engagement patterns of students who took courses for credit recovery in a state virtual school. For the first part of the study, descriptive analysis was used to investigate the virtual school’s enrollment characteristics, and cross-classified multilevel modeling was used to test statistical differences in final grades between credit recovery and other enrollment reason groups, revealing the low-performance of credit recovery students. The second part of the study delved into students’ engagement patterns in one of the courses most frequently taken by credit recovery students. Hierarchical clustering of time series suggested several meaningful learner profiles. Practical implications to be gleaned from findings include early alert system and metacognitive components.

Author
Jemma Bae Kwon, Michigan Virtual

Jemma began with some background to the Michigan Virtual University and its different departments (i.e., MVS, MVLRI, and the PD unit).  Jemma then transitioned to describing the MVLRI.  This particular study was based on MVS data, in particular students who were engaged in credit recovery through MVS.

The literature that was reviewed were the four REL studies:

Hughes, J., Zhou, C., & Petscher, Y. (2015). Comparing success rates for general and credit recovery courses online and face to face: Results for Florida high school courses. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/southeast/pdf/REL_2015095.pdf

Heppen, J., Allensworth, E., Sorensen, N., Rickles, J., Walters, K., Taylor, S., Michelman, V., & Clements, P. (2016). Getting back on track: Comparing the effects of online and face-to-face credit recovery in algebra I. Chicago, IL: American Institute for Research. Retrieved from http://www.air.org/sites/default/files/downloads/report/Online-vs-F2F-Credit-Recovery.pdf

Stevens, D., & Frazelle, S. (2016). Online credit recovery: Enrollment and passing patterns in Montana Digital Academy courses. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Northwest. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/northwest/pdf/REL_2016139.pdf

Stallings, D.T., Weiss, S.P., Maser, R.H., Stanhope, D., Starcke, M., and Li, D. (2016). Academic outcomes for North Carolina Virtual Public School credit recovery students. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast. Retrieved from https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/southeast/pdf/REL_2017177.pdf

Jemma spent a fair amount of time describing the nature of MVS credit recovery students and their demographics.  There was little difference in the completion rate between the online students and the online credit recovery students; however, the passing rate was quite different – with the online credit recovery students passing at a much lower rate than the average for all online students.

To study the course engagement, Jemma chose the highest enrolled online credit recovery course.  The cluster analysis showed that in the Fall, the majority of students completed activities week by week, and generally had success.  In the Spring, the majority of students appeared to be relatively lax during the semester, with a lot of work late in the semester; which generated mixed results.  Finally, in the Summer, there was a wider range of students in each of the cluster profiles, but the majority were still in that persistent clusters.

This session was based upon the report found at https://mvlri.org/research/publications/examining-credit-recovery-learning-profile-time-series-clustering-analysis/

There was a hand-out that I will try to scan in once I get back to California.

Jemma Bae Kwonn – AERA 2018 Hand-out (PDF)

AERA18 Insider – Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Today is the final day of AERA.

AERA18 Insider
Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Welcome to the final day of the 2018 AERA Annual Meeting! Each morning, AERA18 Insider will provide tips on key sessions and events, as well as other Annual Meeting resources and highlights you won’t want to miss.

Join the conversation: Use the conference hashtag #AERA18, and follow AERA on Twitter at@AERA_EdResearch.

Questions? Contact the AERA Meetings team at annualmtg@aera.net, or check out the Navigating the Annual Meeting section of the program for answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

In this Issue:

The Role of Education Researchers in an Era of Fake News


AERA Open Business Meeting


The State of School Climate Studies: The Context of the Americas


Education for Citizenship in Latin America: Common Paths and Challenges


Save the Date! ~ Toronto 2019


Download the Annual Meeting App


Resources


2018 Annual Meeting Sponsors

AERA would like to extend a special thank you to our 2018 sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor
– American Institutes for Research

Gold Sponsor
– SAGE Publishing

Silver Sponsors
– GTCOM
– Mathematica

Bronze Sponsors
– AccessLex Institute
– National Institute of Education
– RAND Corporation





Today’s Highlights

The Role of Education Researchers in an Era of Fake News

8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Beekman
Link to session
Session will also be live-streamed: Register here

In recent times, we have witnessed challenges by federal, state, and local elected officials to the fundamental principles and values of higher education in the United States. Particularly troubling are the disregard and politicization of facts, data, research, and science and mischaracterizations of the meaning and importance of academic freedom. This presidential session seeks to advance productive and interactive dialogue about how we, as individuals and a collective, can ensure the integrity of knowledge now and into the future and effectively respond to challenges to facts, data, research, and science. Dialogue will focus on the role of individual education researchers and AERA in the production, dissemination, and use of research.

The session will be chaired by Laura W. Perna (University of Pennsylvania). Participants include Prudence L. Carter, (University of California, Berkeley), Kris Gutierrez (University of California, Berkeley), Jeffrey R. Henig (Teachers College, Columbia University), William F. Tate (Washington University in St. Louis), William G. Tierney (University of Southern California), Ana M. Martínez-Alemán (Boston College), Demetri L. Morgan (Loyola University Chicago), and Antar Akari Tichavakunda (University of Southern California).

Read brief papers by the presenters here.

AERA Open Business Meeting

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Sheraton New York Times Square, Third Floor, New York Ballroom West
Link to session

The AERA Open Business Meeting provides a time for AERA members to discuss important issues regarding education research and the work of AERA. Members are encouraged to attend this meeting convened by AERA President Deborah Loewenberg Ball (University of Michigan), AERA President-Elect  Amy Stuart Wells (Teachers College, Columbia University), AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine.

The State of School Climate Studies: The Context of the Americas

8:15 a.m. to 9:35 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room East
Link to session

Research on school climate has become increasingly popular internationally.  Important variables in a theory of action for school climate include teacher-pupil relationships, school connectedness, and school violence. These papers represent researchers from within the Americas who have collaborated to initiate school climate studies as part of the thrust towards improving schools. Given their varied experiences, they bring a multi-cultural research perspective. This symposium assesses this body of work and considers its importance and possible impact for wider application across the Americas while analyzing the weaknesses and limitations of current approaches and measures. The session will be chaired by Sylvia Maureen Henry (University of the West Indies).

Education for Citizenship in Latin America: Common Paths and Challenges

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room West
Link to session

Given the emergence of new social and educational challenges, such as globalization, the information society, immigration, or political apathy, the need has arisen to rethink the role of schools and universities in the education of citizens. This symposium seeks to discuss emerging challenges in youth education and in changing contexts of democracy and civil participation in Latin America, particularly in Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, and Chile. The session will be chaired by Carmen Zuniga (Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile); Alejandro Carrasco (Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile) will serve as the discussant.

Save the Date!
2019 AERA Annual Meeting
Friday, April 5 –  Tuesday, April 9
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Photograph by Christian Raul Hernandez. Used with permission under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

 

2018 Annual Meeting Page | Theme | Registration | Visiting NYC |
Meeting Services | Housing & Travel | Exhibits, Sponsors, Advertising | Contact AERA
2018 Annual Meeting
“The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education”
Friday, April 13 – Tuesday, April 17, 2018
New York City, NY


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