Virtual School Meanderings

April 30, 2017

AERA 2017 – Who Loses Students to Low-Quality Schools? Relationships Between Cyber Charters and Educational Disadvantage Over Time

The ninth session I’m blogging at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) is:

Who Loses Students to Low-Quality Schools? Relationships Between Cyber Charters and Educational Disadvantage Over Time

  • In Event: School Choice: Politics of Opportunity and Identity

Sun, April 30, 2:15 to 3:45pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Meeting Room Level, Room 216 A

Abstract

This research examines how shifts in knowledge about the quality of a specific school type relate to changes in demographics of school districts that lose students to this school type. To do so, this study analyzes cyber charter school enrollment in Pennsylvania, showing that as the perceived quality of the cyber charter school sector turns negative, the composition of school districts losing students to this sector changes so that educationally disadvantaged districts are more likely to lose a higher proportion of students. These findings have implications for school choice theory in that certain choice decisions may not promote educational improvement if educationally disadvantaged students are offered and make choices that perpetuate their educational disadvantage.

Authors

  • Bryan Arthur Mann, Pennsylvania State University
  • David P. Baker, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Renata Horvatek, The Pennsylvania State University

The original charter school legislation in Pennsylvania was introduced in 1997, and cyber charter schools emerged from this original legislation – which were actually codified in law in 2002.  Bryan’s study focused on examining the historical student enrollment data (i.e., expansion, distribution, and transition), as well as the historic media reporting about the sector – and what both mean from a systematic standpoint.

In terms of tracking and mapping the enrollment – it has been growing, and fairly consistently in terms of geographic spread throughout the state.

The research tracking has largely focused on student performance – and have generally shown a very weak level of performance.

The media tracking for a long time focused almost exclusively on issues related to funding and governance, but in recent years it has begun to transition to have some focus on student outcomes – but only in a negative way.

School districts where educational attainment has been low tend to lose more and more students to cyber charter schools.  Interestingly, based on the researcher’s data, most of the student moves into cyber charter schools meant that a student was transition from one low attainment school to an even weaker attainment school (i.e., generally leaving a poorly performing brick-and-mortar school to attend a worse cyber charter school).

While the article for this study is still in the peer review process, you can see some of the details here in this Education Week article.

AERA 2017 – Online Learning, Achievement, and Innovation in Charter Schools

The eighth session I’m blogging at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) is:

Online Learning, Achievement, and Innovation in Charter Schools

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 21

Sun, April 30, 10:35am to 12:05pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 1

Session Type: Roundtable Session

Sub Unit

  • SIG-Charters & School Choice

Chairs

  • Julie M Kallio, University of Wisconsin – Madison
  • Chris Torres, Michigan State University

Papers

Charter Schools’ Innovation Reporting Levels and Student Achievement

Abstract

The purpose of this exploratory mixed-methods study was to define innovation reporting levels in charter schools in Miami-Dade and Sarasota Counties in Florida and to determine what relationship exists between this innovation reporting and student achievement (as measured by Florida school grades) in Title I and high minority student population charter schools. A qualitative analysis of School Improvement Plans and school websites resulted in a 62 charter school sample for which descriptive statistics were utilized to define student achievement (Florida school grades 2010-2013). The results demonstrated that innovation saturation exists in Title I schools and high minority student population schools (≥50%). Thus, there is no value added to student achievement (school grade averages) by reported innovation beyond a moderate level.

Author

  • Einav Danan Cabrera, Florida Virtual School

Do Testing Conditions Explain Cyber Charter Schools’ Failing Grades?

Abstract

Research finds that cyber charter schools underperform academically relative to traditional public schools, with significantly lower value-added on tested subjects. Our fieldwork suggests that the performance gaps may in part reflect artificial testing conditions experienced by cyber charter school students. We surveyed state education agency officials in 17 states with cyber charter schools. Initial analyses indicate that states in which cyber charter students are tested on schedules at variance with traditional public school testing schedules have lower performing cyber school sectors. We also find that higher cyber school student attrition is associated with lower academic performance. Additional analyses will examine the impacts of testing conditions in two cyber schools within a single state to deepen understanding.

Authors

  • Dennis Beck, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
  • Robert A. Maranto, University of Arkansas
  • Angela Watson, University of Arkansas

K–12 Online Learning and School Choice: Growth and Expansion in the Absence of Evidence

Abstract

In this paper, the author situates school choice within the field of K-12 online learning, specifically the use of full-time K-12 online learning in the form of cyber charter schools. The author then examines the use of cyber charter schools as a mechanism for school choice in K-12 online learning, specifically the effectiveness of cyber charter schools. This examination focuses on not just the findings, but critically examines the sources (and potential motivations) for those findings. Given the growth of full-time K-12 online learning, and the continued pressure by proponents to create favorable regulatory climates for cyber charter schools, a critical – but honest – examination of student outcomes is long overdue.

Author

  • Michael Kristopher Barbour, Touro University – California

As I was a part of this session, I didn’t take notes to be engaged in the participatory nature of the roundtable.  I do have the hand-out that I used for the session at:

https://www.academia.edu/32730228/Barbour_M._K._2017_April_._K_12_online_learning_and_school_choice_Growth_and_expansion_in_the_absence_of_evidence._A_roundtable_presentation_at_the_annual_meeting_of_the_American_Educational_Research_Association_San_Antonio_TX

AERA 2017 – Investigating the Relationship Between Students’ Online Engagement and Their Online Course Outcomes

The seventh session I’m blogging at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) is:

Investigating the Relationship Between Students’ Online Engagement and Their Online Course Outcomes

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 20
    In Roundtable Session: 52.084-11 – Students’ Perceptions, Outcomes, Online Engagement, and Satisfaction

Sun, April 30, 8:15 to 9:45am, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 3

Abstract

This study used data from the fall 2014 semester at Wisconsin Virtual School to examine whether patterns of student engagement in online courses were associated with course out-comes. Using group-based trajectory modeling, the study found that student enrollments in online courses followed one of six engagement patterns, with average engagement ranging from 1.5 hours to 6 or more hours per week. Most students (77 percent) steadily engaged in their online courses for 1.5 or 2.5 hours per week. Students who engaged in their online course for two or more hours per week had better course outcomes than students who engaged for few-er than two hours per week.

Authors

  • Peggy Clements, American Institutes for Research
  • Heather Lavigne, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Angela Pazzaglia, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Erin Stafford, Education Development Center, Inc.

As I noted in the previous entry I have made it to AERA, but I’m actually chairing a session on Learning From the Federal Market-Based Reforms: Lessons for the Every Student Succeeds Act.  So if you are in this session, please post your notes in the comments below.

AERA 2017 – Parents’ Use of Litigation to Enhance the Experience of Students With Disabilities in Online Schools In Event: Litigation Trends in K–12 Education Relating to Students With Special Needs and School Privatization

The sixth session I’m blogging at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) is:

Parents’ Use of Litigation to Enhance the Experience of Students With Disabilities in Online Schools

  • In Event: Litigation Trends in K–12 Education Relating to Students With Special Needs and School Privatization

Sun, April 30, 8:15 to 9:45am, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Meeting Room Level, Room 217 B

Abstract

Virtual schooling is gaining in popularity in the United States. Parents increasingly view online schooling as a viable option for their children with disabilities as schools promise to deliver individualized, self-paced instruction and provide additional supports either within the home or at regional centers. Parents play an important role in online schooling because most of this form of education is provided in the child’s home over the Internet. This research analyzes the opportunities and trials of virtual schooling for students with disabilities by examining the legal challenges parents have brought surrounding their participation. It identifies common problems and concludes with suggestions for both parents and schools on structuring a successful experience for students with disabilities in virtual learning environments.

Authors

  • Regina R. Umpstead, Central Michigan University
  • Nicole Snyder, Latsha Davis & McKenna
  • Linda Weiss, Central Michigan University

While I have actually made it to AERA, I’m actually chairing a session on Learning From the Federal Market-Based Reforms: Lessons for the Every Student Succeeds Act  – which means I’m not in the room to take notes.  So if you are in this session, please post your notes in the comments below.

AERA17 Insider – Sunday, April 30, 2017

The AERA update for today…

AERA17 Insider
April 30, 2017

Welcome to the fourth day of the AERA Annual Meeting. Each morning, AERA17 Insider will provide tips on key sessions and events, as well as other Annual Meeting resources and highlights you won’t want to miss.

Join the conversation: Use the conference hashtag #AERA17, and follow AERA on Twitter at@AERA_EdResearch.

Questions? Contact the AERA Meetings team at annualmtg@aera.net.

In this Issue:

A Town Hall Meeting on the Role of AERA as a Research Organization in Socially Challenging Times


Social Justice in Education Award Lecture


Former Presidents Respond to Annual Meeting Theme


Conversations Around the Collection and Use of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data


Toward Democratic Possibilities: Another Kind of Public Education Revisited


Data Sharing and Research Transparency at the Stage of Journal Publishing


Research, Statistics, and Data: The Vital Role of the Institute of Education Sciences in Retrospect and Prospect


Education Unbordered: Immigrant, Refugee, Detained, and Undocumented Children and Families


Racial Conciliation, Interest Convergence, and the Role of Education and Schooling


Technology, Digital Media, and Implications for Learning Sciences


Opportunities for Federal Research Funding: Institute of Education Sciences, National Science Foundation, and National Institutes of Health


Promising Scholarship in Education Research: Dissertation Fellows and Their Studies


Today’s Live-Streaming Sessions


DOWNLOAD THE ANNUAL MEETING APP


Speakers’ Corner

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! A Conversation About Education Research Careers Outside the University
Speaker: Gerald E. Sroufe (AERA)
10:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall, AERA Booth

Marching for Education Science: A Participating AERA Member’s Perspective
Speaker: Kenji Hakuta (Stanford University)
12:00 p.m.
Exhibit Hall, AERA Booth

Advocating for Education Research in District Offices
Speakers: Juliane Baron (AERA) and Christy Talbot (AERA)
2:00 p.m.
Exhibit Hall, AERA Booth


Resources


2017 Annual Meeting Sponsors

AERA would like to extend a special thank you to our 2017 sponsors:

Platinum Sponsors
– American Institutes for Research
– Routledge

Gold Sponsor
– SAGE Publishing

Bronze Sponsors
– AccessLex
– IDRA
– National Institute of Education, Singapore
– NORC at the University of Chicago

Reception Sponsor
– UTSA





Today’s Highlights

A Town Hall Meeting on the Role of AERA as a Research Organization in Socially Challenging Times

4:05 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Meeting Room Level, Room 220 – Cantilever

Link to Session

Session participants include Vivian L. Gadsden (University of Pennsylvania), Jeannie Oakes (University of California – Los Angeles), and Deborah Loewenberg Ball (University of Michigan – Ann Arbor).

Social Justice in Education Award Lecture

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Grand Hyatt San Antonio
Fourth Floor
Texas Ballroom Salon E
Session Hashtag:#AERASJ

Link to Session

The Social Justice in Education Award Lecture will be delivered by Estela M. Bensimon (University of Southern California) and will center around the paper “Making Higher Education Just.”

Former Presidents Respond to Annual Meeting Theme
12:25 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level
Room 302 A&B

Link to Session

The session is designed as a venue for former AERA presidents to offer perspectives and insights on the 2017 theme, Knowledge to Action: 
Achieving the Promise of Equal Educational Opportunity. Presidents from the past three decades will provide brief commentaries on the issues raised in the theme and the role AERA can play in shaping the future of educational research. By situating former struggles and their complexities, former presidents will discuss the challenges and promises inherent within educational research, practice, policy. Session participants include James Banks (University of Washington- Seattle), Linda Darling-Hammond (Learning Policy Institute), Frank Farley (Temple University), Kris Gutierrez (University of California – Berkeley), Gloria Ladson-Billings (University of Wisconsin – Madison), Carol Lee (Northwestern University), Jeannie Oakes (University of California – Los Angeles), Barbara Schneider (Michigan State University), Catherine Snow (Harvard University), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis), and William Tierney (University of Southern California).

Conversations Around the Collection and Use of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data
8:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level, Room 302 A&B

Link to Session

Increasingly, data are gathered on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI). For example, federal data collection agencies have listed guidelines for how to ask about SOGI, and some agencies (e.g., CDC) release individual-level data on youth sexual orientation. The National Center for Education Statistics is beginning to include SOGI items in its High School Longitudinal Study (HSLS). Research societies and scientific associations are examining the best methods to collect sexual orientation and gender identity from members. As these data collection efforts proliferate and evolve, this panel will discuss topics including (a) the history of federal interagency efforts to include SOGI item guidance, (b) the development of the new SOGI items in HSLS, (c) best practices for SOGI data collection, (d) considerations around ensuring SOGI data validity with large datasets, and (e) how research societies are capturing and collecting gender identity. Following the panelists’ presentations, the audience will have time to engage panelists in a Q&A session. Session participants include Joseph Cimpian (New York University), Elise Christopher (NCES/IES), Emily Greytak (GLSEN), and sj Miller (NYU Steinhardt – The Metropolitan Center).

Toward Democratic Possibilities: Another Kind of Public Education Revisited
10:35 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level, Room 301 A&B

Link to Session

This session will address critical issues related to students’ experiences within the larger context of feminist ideologies, racial theories, and practical realities of schooling. Drawing upon epistemologies and frameworks addressing questions of equality and equity, participants will focus on multiple questions, among them, the representation and empirical study of gender in educational research, the role of teaching, knowledge production and learning, and the consequences of gendered identities for students in school and society. Session participants include Patricia Hill Collins (University of Maryland – College Park), Joseph Cimpian (New York University), Kimberly Scott (Arizona State University), and Anthony Brown (The University of Texas at Austin).

Data Sharing and Research Transparency at the Stage of Journal Publishing
10:35 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Meeting Room Level
Room 220-Cantilever

Link to Session

Session participants include Victoria Stodden (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Mark Berends (University of Notre Dame & AERJ Co-Editor), Arthur Lupia (University of Michigan), Carolyn Herrington (Florida State University & ER Co-Editor), and Margaret Levenstein (ICPSR).

Research, Statistics, and Data: The Vital Role of the Institute of Education Sciences in Retrospect and Prospect
10:35 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level
Room 302 A&B

Link to Session

Session participants include Thomas Brock (IES), Peggy Carr (NCES/IES), Susanna Loeb (Stanford University), Michael McPherson (The Spencer Foundation), and Larry Hedges (Northwestern University).

Education Unbordered: Immigrant, Refugee, Detained, and Undocumented Children and Families
12:25 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level, 301 A&B

Link to Session

This session will focus on the individual and collective issues associated with immigration, refugee, detained, and undocumented children and families. How do we imagine schools as boundless in the context they engage and the opportunities they can afford for all children, and especially for children who enter the country? What is the status of research and how is it informing change for these children and their families? What is the role of schools, and what is needed in policy and practice to mediate the hardship and complexity of both the process and effect of policies? How are borders made more permeable and open for schools to effect change? Session participants include Saskia Sassen (Columbia University) and Rogelio Saenz (The University of Texas at San Antonio).

Racial Conciliation, Interest Convergence, and the Role of Education and Schooling
2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level, 302 A&B

Link to Session

This session will examine the role of education research and practice within the context of current debates around race and racial equity. It will address three questions: Is it possible to measure racial progress and chart a path toward further progress? Are racial conciliation and interest convergence panaceas to quell discontent and to avoid difficult issues, or are they viable pathways to promote access and justice? What is the role of educational research, practice, and policy in this discussion? Session participants include James Earl Davis (Temple University), Stella M. Flores (New York University), and Daniel Losen (University of California – Los Angeles).

Technology, Digital Media, and Implications for Learning Sciences
2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level, 301 A&B

Link to Session

This session will focus on emerging technologies and their uses in epistemological framings, teaching, and the construction of knowledge. Technology and digital media have the potential to play a powerful role in shaping educational research, practice and policy. This power is evident when we consider how recent social movements have developed. Current complexities such as the digital divide will be considered in terms of how technology and digital media both afford and constrain teaching and learning. The session will consider how we can harness technology and digital media developments to the benefit of a more equitable educational agenda? Session participants include James Paul Gee (Arizona State University) and Louis M. Gomez (University of California – Los Angeles).

Opportunities for Federal Research Funding: Institute of Education Sciences, National Science Foundation, and National Institutes of Health
2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level, Room 303 A&B

Link to Session

Session participants include Elizabeth R. Albro (U.S. Department of Education), Evan Heit (National Science Foundation), and James A. Griffin (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development).

Promising Scholarship in Education Research: Dissertation Fellows and Their Studies
12:55 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 2

Be sure to come visit this exciting poster session and hear about the studies of dissertation fellows!

Today’s Live-Streaming Sessions

 


Browse more key speakers, featured presidential sessions, and session hashtags.

2017 Annual Meeting PageTheme | Registration | Visiting San Antonio |
Meeting Services | Housing & Travel | Exhibits, Sponsors, Advertising | Contact AERA
2017 Annual Meeting
“Knowledge to Action: Achieving the Promise of Equal Educational Opportunity”
Thursday, April 27 – Monday, May 1, 2017
San Antonio, Texas


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