Virtual School Meanderings

April 12, 2016

AERA16 Insider – April 12, 2016

The AERA update for today, the final day…

AERA16 Insider
April 12, 2016

Welcome to the final day of the AERA Annual Meeting. This last AERA16 Insider will provide tips on key sessions and events, as well as other Annual Meeting resources and highlights you won’t want to miss.

Join the conversation: Use the conference hashtag #AERA16, and follow AERA on Twitter at@AERA_EdResearch.

Questions? Contact the AERA Meetings team at annualmtg@aera.net.

In This Issue:

AERA Open Business Meeting


How Much Testing?


Ed-Talks: Inclusive Education Practices


Participation in Computer Science Education


DOWNLOAD THE
ANNUAL MEETING APP


RESOURCES


2016 Annual Meeting Sponsors
AERA would like to extend a special thank you to our 2016 sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor
Routledge

Gold Sponsor
SAGE Publishing

Silver Sponsors
Teachers College Press

Access Group Center for Policy & Research Analysis

Bronze Sponsors
Montclair State University

NIE, Singapore

NORC at the University of Chicago


Today’s Highlights
AERA Open Business Meeting

8:15 to 9:45 a.m., Convention Center, Level Two, Room 209 A

Link to Session

The AERA Open Business Meeting provides a time for AERA members to discuss important issues regarding education research and the work of AERA. Members are encouraged to attend this meeting convened by AERA President Jeannie Oakes.

How Much Testing and for What Purpose? Public Scholarship in the Debate about Educational Assessment and Accountability

10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m., Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

Session hashtag: #AERAHowMuchTesting
Link to Session
Session will also be live-streamed

Session participants will respond to the questions and concerns that students, parents, teachers, and other diverse stakeholders have raised in the public debate on testing. How much testing is appropriate? Who should be tested, how frequently, and on what content? How should the results of these tests be used? Crowdsourced questions will inform this session, with discussion having started months prior to the Annual Meeting, tagged with #AERAHowMuchTesting. Participants will also consider the role and impact of research in a policy arena so infused with politics and ideology. Participants include Linda Darling-Hammond (Stanford University), Eric A. Hanushek (Stanford University), Lorrie A. Shepard (University of Colorado Boulder), and David C. Berliner (Arizona State University).

Ed-Talks: Inclusive Education Practices
10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m., Convention Center, Level Two, Room 207 B

Link to Session

This series of talks examines the types of practices that create a supportive learning environment for all students. These talks focus on both the barriers to, and possible solutions for providing an equitable education for students from all backgrounds. Session participants include Alfredo Artiles (Arizona State University), Diana Hess (University of Wisconsin – Madison), Elizabeth Moje (University of Michigan), and Sharon Nelson-Barber (WestEd). Commentators include Nirvi Shah (Politico) and Mario Cardona (White House Domestic Policy Council).

Public Scholarship Broadening Participation in Computer Science Education
2:15 to 3:45 p.m., Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

Link to Session

This symposium on public scholarship tackles race- and gender stratification in the field of computer science. Learn how the National Science Foundation (NSF), higher education, and K12 collaborated on a multi-million dollar investment in broadening computer science opportunities. Stories from district-university partnerships illustrate how these collective efforts ignited an explosion of computer science courses for underrepresented students. While much work remains, efforts to improve equitable computer science access—by leveraging the influence, resources, and know-how of federal, university, and K12 partners—demonstrate how educational disparities can be addressed via equity-minded curriculum, teacher development, district scale-up, policy advocacy, research and evaluation.


SAVE THE DATES
2017 AERA Annual Meeting
April 27May 1, 2017
Annual Meeting Page
Program
Registration
Housing, Travel, & Tourism
Presenter and Participant Info
Exhibits, Sponsors, Advertising
Professional Development
Grad Student Resources
Press Info and Registration
Meeting Info & Accessibility
Contact AERA
2016 Annual Meeting
“Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies”
Friday, April 8 – Tuesday, April 12, 2016
Washington, D.C.

Questions?
Contact the AERA Meetings Team at annualmtg@aera.net


This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com. You are receiving this email because of your association with AERA. Click the following link to change your preference or opt out of AERA emails: preferences

American Educational Research Association
1430 K Street, NW, Suite 1200
Washington, DC 20005
www.aera.net

April 11, 2016

AERA 2016 – Utilizing the Innovation Ecosystem to Promote Change in the Classroom: A Teacher’s Perspective

As I mentioned in the entry entitled AERA 2016 and K-12 Online Learning, the 2016 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is occurring in Washington, DC over the next few days.  That means that I will be blogging many of the sessions throughout the week.  The twelfth session (and the last one for today) that I am blogging is:

Utilizing the Innovation Ecosystem to Promote Change in the Classroom: A Teacher’s Perspective

  • In Event: Breaking Down Silos, Advancing Innovation: Understanding Innovation Ecosystems in Education Technology

11:45am to 1:15pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Two, Marquis Salon 12

Abstract

In a school system consisting of 95% charter schools, one might expect collaboration among individual operators to be nonexistent or fragmented at best. However, the edtech ecosystem in New Orleans is currently thriving and serves as one of the key drivers of the city’s continued educational growth and innovation. As the Director of Blended Learning for KIPP New Orleans schools and a consultant for Educate Now!, I am currently focused on three intertwined projects: 1) leading academic innovation in our ten KIPP schools through the integration of technology, 2) directing the edtech collaboration efforts between charters through the New Orleans EdTech Meetup and Personalized Learning Community of Practice, and 3) creating digital partnerships between low-income school students and local university students through “virtual volunteering”. School-level autonomy and direct oversight has granted our edtech community the unique opportunity to pilot independent innovations, share results, adopt each other’s best practices, and avoid each other’s past failures. Key stakeholder groups include public and private school teachers, administrators, students and parents, as well as local university professors and students. While charter schools have spurred the growth of innovation in New Orleans, two independent education nonprofits, Educate Now! and New Schools for New Orleans, are responsible for the birth of our edtech ecosystem through their leadership and financial support.
At KIPP New Orleans, we believe technology has the power to enhance educational outcomes in four key ways: increase feedback to students, increase rigor (cross-curricular projects, creative computing, digital research), enable differentiation and personalization (data, grouping, and competency based pathways), and allow for greater digital communication and collaboration (online communities, email, and other communication mediums). In my current role as Director of Blended Learning, I help teachers leverage technology effectively to achieve these goals. At Educate Now!, I work to recruit all-star teachers to share their methods across schools in order to encourage further innovation. Through partnerships with Tulane University, we are investigating the true power of digital collaboration by connecting college students with low-income students to work together virtually on writing projects.
Every innovation we have implemented in our schools in New Orleans has come from collaboration efforts between educators, universities, parents, and students both in the city and across the nation. Although our local edtech ecosystem has the greatest potential to impact our schools, we often call in outside experts as speakers and/or consultants. Both the New Orleans and national edtech ecosystems are alive and thriving; however, this collaboration requires deliberate leadership, monetary sponsorship, and full accountability in order to truly foster cross-community innovation. As a member of this panel, I will share my experiences using technology as an agent of change in teaching and learning in New Orleans as well as reflect on the role the edtech ecosystem has played in supporting our work.

Author

  • Hilah Barbot, KIPP New Orleans

Hilah is former Teach for America that was placed in KIPP New Orleans four years post-Katrina.  She was part of the first class out of the Educational Entrepreneurial program at U Penn.  In listening to her introduction, it was clear that she was well indoctrinated into the neo-liberal propaganda related to charter schooling, alternative certification, and entrepreneurship in education in general.  Having said that…

Hilah indicated that the main theme throughout her paper was attempting to address the question of “Who’s feeding who?”  As the director of blended learning at her school, in her first year her role was focused on her feeding the teachers on what was blended learning and how to use blended learning.  But since that point, it has shifted more to a a role of the teachers feeding each other, and her role has been more making connections between these teachers.

At this stage of the game, she is in a position where she is working with multiple schools throughout the city on implementing personalized learning using the Gates model.  One of the strategies that they have been using is monthly EdTech meet-ups, which are educator only (i.e., businesses are not invited).  Another strategy has been to bring instructional leaders from each of the schools together, where they observe a different school each month.  These leaders use the Gates framework to provide feedback to the observed school.  The third strategy that she discussed was trying to get the higher education community involved – both in terms of partnership and research; which has been the item that has been most difficult to accomplish.

Hilah then transitioned to the role that the entrepreneurial ecosystem at Penn has played in providing support for these kinds of strategies, leaving the educators to focus upon education.

While not a statement that Hilah made, probably one of the most dangerous comments that was made came from the discussant, “why are there not clinic trials in education like we see in health care?”  Easy answer, because that “gold standard” of research that neo-liberals have made the be all and end all in educational research is quite a flawed model.  I mean do we really want our educational products to come with warnings like:

Before receiving XXXX, tell your [teacher or paraprofessional] if you are allergic to it; or to aspirin, other NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen), other COX-2 inhibitors; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your [teacher] for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your[teacher or paraprofessional]  your [education] history, especially of: asthma (including a history of worsening breathing after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs), liver disease, stomach/intestine/esophagus problems (such as bleeding, ulcers, recurring heartburn), heart disease (such as angina, heart attack), high blood pressure, stroke, blood disorders (such as anemia, bleeding/clotting problems), growths in the nose (nasal polyps)….

AERA 2016 – Multiple Perspectives on a Blended Learning Initiative in a Large Suburban High School

As I mentioned in the entry entitled AERA 2016 and K-12 Online Learning, the 2016 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is occurring in Washington, DC over the next few days.  That means that I will be blogging many of the sessions throughout the week.  The eleventh session (and the first one for today) that I am blogging is:

Multiple Perspectives on a Blended Learning Initiative in a Large Suburban High School

  • In Event: Poster Session 10
    In Poster Session: Designing Effective Learning Environments II

10:00 to 11:30am, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D

Abstract

This study examines a blended learning initiative in a large suburban high school in the Midwestern region of the United States. It employs a single-case exploratory design approach to learn about the experience of administrators, teachers, students, and parents. Using Zimmmerman’s Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) Theory as a guiding framework, this study explores surveys, face-to-face observation data, interview transcriptions, and focus group transcriptions to learn about different perspectives on the experience as well as on student readiness for high school blended learning classes. As a result, the data suggests four majors themes, namely how blended learning initiatives can transform and reinvigorate instruction, capitalize on the affordances of flex time, build productive relationships, and support 21st century students and educators.

Authors

  • Aimee Whiteside, University of Tampa
  • Amy E. Garrett Dikkers, University of North Carolina – Wilmington
  • Somer Lewis, University of North Carolina – Wilmington

As this was a poster session, I took pictures of the poster.

IMG_5958

Click on any image to view a larger version.

IMG_5959 IMG_5960 IMG_5961

This poster was largely based on on an article entitled “Do You Blend? Huntley High School Does.

AERA16 Insider – April 11, 2016

The daily AERA update…

AERA16 Insider
April 11, 2016

Welcome to day four of the AERA Annual Meeting. Each morning, AERA16 Insider will provide tips on key sessions and events, as well as other Annual Meeting resources and highlights you won’t want to miss.

Join the conversation: Use the conference hashtag #AERA16, and follow AERA on Twitter at@AERA_EdResearch.

Questions? Contact the AERA Meetings team at annualmtg@aera.net.

In This Issue:

Special Event: Dr. Jill Biden


Wallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture


The Fisher Case and Diversity of Higher Education


#BlackGirlsMatter


Ed-Talks: Broadening Conceptions of Learning


Career Threats and Opportunities


Ed-Talks: Increasing the Education and Life Chances for the New American Majority


Schools, Rules, and Socialization Effects for Students


DOWNLOAD THE 
ANNUAL MEETING APP


ALSO HAPPENING TODAY:
Exhibit Hall Opens: 9:00 a.m.
Promising Scholarship in Education: Dissertation Fellows and Their Research Poster Session


RESOURCES


2016 Annual Meeting Sponsors
AERA would like to extend a special thank you to our 2016 sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor
Routledge

Gold Sponsor
SAGE Publishing

Silver Sponsors
Teachers College Press

Access Group Center for Policy & Research Analysis

Bronze Sponsors
Montclair State University

NIE, Singapore

NORC at the University of Chicago


Today’s Highlights
Special Event: Dr. Jill Biden

Operation Educate the Educators: Recognizing and Supporting Military-Connected Students Through University-Based Research, Community Partnerships, and Teacher Education Programs

1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

Session hashtag: #AERAJillBiden
Link to Session
Session will also be live-streamed

Dr. Jill Biden, Second Lady of the United States, lifelong educator, and military mom will speak about her work with Operation Educate the Educators as part of her Joining Forces initiative. Dr. Biden will be joined in a question and answer period by Ron Avi Astor (University of Southern California), Catherine Bradshaw (University of Virginia), and Mary Keller (Military Child Education Coalition). It is estimated that over 4 million students in the U.S. have parents who have served in the military since 9-11. Despite multiple school moves and parental deployment, military- and veteran-connected students show remarkable resilience. Educational research suggests that schools can better serve military- and veteran-connected students. National policy, new research funding, and efforts in over 100 universities are now underway to increase the number of university schools of education that include materials, research, and partnerships focused on students from military and veteran families. Dr. Biden’s Operation Educate the Educators program aims to increase awareness of this group among university schools of education.

To learn more about military-connected student education issues and to request more information on how to include military- and veteran-connected students in your work, click here.

Wallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture: Warren Simmons, Fellow and Former Executive Director, Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University

Increasing the Relevance of Education Research: Building a Place-Based Agenda for Obtaining Equity and Excellence

11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

Session hashtag: #AERAWallace
Link to Session
Session will also be live-streamed

The Wallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture will be given by Warren Simmons, former executive director of the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. He is currently Senior Fellow and team-teaches a course in urban systems and structure in Brown University’s Urban Education Policy master’s program.

The Fisher Case and Diversity in Higher Education: The Pending Decision and Beyond

Liliana M. Garces

Gary A. Orfield

4:30 to 6:00 p.m., Convention Center, Level Two, Room 204 C

Link to Session

In this session, Liliana M. Garces (The Pennsylvania State University – University Park), William Kidder (University of California – Riverside), Gary A. Orfield (University of California – Los Angeles), and Shirley Malcom (American Association for the Advancement of Science) will discuss the U.S. Supreme Court’s reconsideration of Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, the implications of the pending decision, and the vital importance of diversity in higher education.

#BlackGirlsMatter: Public Scholarship Engaging with the Race/Gender Interaction in Schools

10:00 to 11:30 a.m., Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

Session Hashtag: #AERABlackGirlsMatter
Link to Session
Session will also be live-streamed

This session seeks to open up new avenues of scholarship focused on the promises and perils Black girls and women encounter in PK – 20 systems. The session will also explore how such scholarship could inform policy-based solutions to improve the academic success and life chances of Black girls and women. Session participants include Bettina L. Love (University of Georgia – Athens), Lori Patton Davis (Indiana University – IUPUI), Adrienne Dixson (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign), and Melissa Harris Perry (Wake Forest University).

Ed-Talks: Broadening Conceptions of Learning
10:00 to 11:30 a.m., Convention Center, Level Two, Room 207 B

Link to Session

This series of talks seek to explain how students actually learn and how to apply this knowledge to effective teaching methods. The talks will explain why policy and practice need to be undergirded by robust knowledge of how people learn across contexts and life activities, and how identity, culture, and history are implicated. Participants include Michelene Chi (Arizona State University), Kris Gutierrez (University of California – Berkeley), Young-Suk Kim (Florida State University), and Barbara Rogoff (University of California – Santa Cruz). Commentators include Emily Hanford (American RadioWorks) and Raymond C. Hart (Council of the Great City Schools).

Career Threats and Opportunities: What Is the Role of Social Media in Public Scholarship?

2:45 to 4:15 p.m., Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

Session Hashtag: #AERAPubScholar
Link to Session
Session will also be live-streamed

Researchers will discuss social media approaches to public scholarship that can democratize education knowledge. Panelists will focus on how social media can advance academic scholarship discussions but also may pose threats to academic careers, particularly for junior scholars. Questions from audience-generated social media will be discussed by the panelists, as both conference participants and streaming viewers from across the nation and world contribute comments and questions in advance and in real-time via Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, using the hashtag#AERAPubScholar. Participants include Diane Ravitch (New York University), Sara Goldrick-Rab (University of Wisconsin Madison), Frederick M. Hess (American Enterprise Institute), and Nolan L. Cabrera (The University of Arizona).

Ed-Talks: Increasing the Education and Life Chances for the New American Majority

4:30 to 6:00 p.m., Convention Center, Level Three, Room 207 B

Link to Session

These talks highlight the importance of intersections among families, schools, and communities in student development, how teaching and schooling contribute to learning in and out of school, and how educational and social policies can combine to support learning, development, and wellbeing across different communities. The talks will examine the obstacles students from varying communities face, as well as address how to harness community relationships to help overcome barriers. Participants Vivian L. Gadsden (University of Pennsylvania), Barbara Schneider (Michigan State University), and Laura W. Perna (University of Pennsylvania). Commentators include Dan Berrett (Chronicle of Higher Education) and Brenda Calderon (National Council of La Raza).
Schools, Rules, and Socialization Effects for Students: A Research Agenda
10:00 to 11:30 a.m., Convention Center, Level Two, Room 204 B

Link to Session

This session emanates from an AERA/AIR research conference on the effects of school socialization, school discipline, and implicit and explicit rules and norms on children’s attitudes and learned behaviors. The conference convened approximately 25 scholars from a range of disciplines to focus on the current state of knowledge in these areas, different theoretical and methodological approaches used to address these topics, critical gaps in the research, and ways in which promising research from one domain might inform research in another. A forthcoming manuscript based on the conference will outline a broader empirical and interdisciplinary research agenda that can be used to provide direction and focus for future research. Participants will provide observations from the vantage of their research expertise, address how diverse research agendas add to our collective understanding, and engage in dialogue with session attendees. Participants include Allison Dymnicki (American Institutes for Research), Kathryn R. Wentzel (University of Maryland), Russell J. Skiba (Indiana University), Ellen Cohn (University of New Hampshire), and Dorothy L. Espelage (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign).
Annual Meeting Page
Program
Registration
Housing, Travel, & Tourism
Presenter and Participant Info
Exhibits, Sponsors, Advertising
Professional Development
Grad Student Resources
Press Info and Registration
Meeting Info & Accessibility
Contact AERA
2016 Annual Meeting
“Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies”
Friday, April 8 – Tuesday, April 12, 2016
Washington, D.C.

Questions?
Contact the AERA Meetings Team at annualmtg@aera.net


This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com. You are receiving this email because of your association with AERA. Click the following link to change your preference or opt out of AERA emails: preferences

American Educational Research Association
1430 K Street, NW, Suite 1200
Washington, DC 20005
www.aera.net

April 10, 2016

AERA 2016 – The Implementation and Impacts of Blended Learning in Catholic and Jewish Community Day Schools

As I mentioned in the entry entitled AERA 2016 and K-12 Online Learning, the 2016 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is occurring in Washington, DC over the next few days.  That means that I will be blogging many of the sessions throughout the week.  The tenth session (and the only one for today) that I am blogging is:

The Implementation and Impacts of Blended Learning in Catholic and Jewish Community Day Schools

  • In Event: Using Digital Technology to Create Unique Learning Spaces

2:45 to 4:15pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Two, Marquis Salon 14

Abstract

This research explores the implementation and impacts of blended learning in nine independent schools. We draw on interviews, focus groups, surveys, student performance data, and financial and administrative documents to better understand schools’ approaches to blended learning implementation, stakeholder experiences, student outcomes, and impacts on schools’ financial needs.

Findings suggest that blended learning can support academic learning and non-cognitive skill development. However, blended learning implementation demands significant teacher time and teachers require support, especially around data use. Early student outcomes analysis suggests that blended learning is associated with test score increases in math, particularly for students that began the academic year performing low academically. Blended learning has not yet helped schools in this study to substantially freeze or reduce costs.

Authors

  • Tricia Maas, University of Washington
  • Betheny Gross, University of Washington
  • Larry Miller, Rutgers University
  • Patrick Denice, University of Washington

So while Tricia was listed as being at the University of Washington, she represented the Center for Reinventing Public Education (CRPE).  Anyway, the schools that were a part of this study were using a station rotation model.  The rationale for this model – based on the new-liberal propaganda – is that it allows for student control of their learnings, it allows for individualized instruction, it provides better data from the learning management system, and it is more cost efficient.

Most of the research into blended learning has focused on cheaters , and has often been case studies focused on the importance of infrastructure, professional development, and variable content quality.  There have been limited impact studies, which have results in mixed to positive findings.  There has been a deficient of research on blended learning in religious school contexts (even though they have much of the autonomy that charter schools have).

The sample included 9 schools: 5 Jewish schools and 4 Catholic schools (2 of which were the primary focus).  The Jewish schools tended to have higher tuition, as well as more grant funding.  The Catholic schools had lower tuition and also a wider range of of students (and a much higher percentage of at-risk students).  The studies themselves were done over two years, including 2 rounds of surveys with students, teachers, and parents; as well as site visits.

The findings included:

  • Teachers needed support, particularly when it came to managing and using the data to inform instruction
  • Often times there was a blended learning coordinator at the school, and those schools teachers did report to feeling more supported in those contexts
  • Blended learning did not have a meaningful impact on how well they knew their students in a non-academic sense 
  • It was also reported that blended learning didn’t impact the religious values of the schools
  • Teachers did report that blended learning had a positive impact on the academic relationship s with their students
  • Some schools experienced parent resistance to blended learning, and those that did not it was due to the fact that they did a good job up front of explaining how blended learning was being implemented in the schools

One of the key take always from the researchers was that the schools were concerned that blended learning would impact the school culture, but it often did not have much of an impact.  In the case of the Catholic schools it was because it was already engrained into the ethos of the school, whereas in the Jewish schools it was largely due to the small class sizes that the school culture was able to be forced onto the schools and its students.

Another take always that was presented was that granting parents the ability to experience blended learning was important to both have them understand the system and to gain their support for the project.

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