Virtual School Meanderings

July 10, 2017

Scopus Author Citation Alert: “Citations For Barbour, Michael K. (Author Identifier 7005949699)”

Note this from one of my academic networks.

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Scopus author citation alert
Citations for Barbour, Michael K. (Author Identifier 7005949699) – 1 new result
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 Integrating learning management system with facebook function: The effect on perception towards online project based collaborative learning Razali S.N., Shahbodin F., Ahmad M.H., Nor H.A.M. 2017 International Journal on Advanced Science, Engineering and Information Technology,
7(3)pp.799-807.
0
View all new results in Scopus
This alert is based on the following query: “Barbour, Michael K. (Author ID 7005949699)”
The previous alert was sent on 30 Jun 2017
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Copyright © 2017  Elsevier B.V.  , Radarweg 29, 1043 NX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
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Delivery Job: ID: 0a70df11017a48113:083522792:0a70df11017a48113:059340520   Webuser ID: 11193099   Alert ID: 1773309

July 4, 2017

Scopus Author Citation Alert: “Citations for Barbour, Michael K. (Author Identifier 7005949699)”

Note these articles related to K-12 distance, online, and/or blended learning from one of my open scholarship networks.

Select to go to the Scopus main search page
Scopus author citation alert
Citations for Barbour, Michael K. (Author Identifier 7005949699) – 2 new results
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 The remote synchronous classroom in China Cai J., Yang H.H., Li Y., MacLeod J. 2017 Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics),
10309 LNCSpp.379-386.
0
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 The findings of multi-mode blended learning in K-12: A case study of V-China education program Li Y., Wu M., Dai J., Chen S. 2017 Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics),
10309 LNCSpp.84-96.
0
This alert is based on the following query: “Barbour, Michael K. (Author ID 7005949699)”
The previous alert was sent on 23 Jun 2017
Terms and Conditions            Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2017  Elsevier B.V.  , Radarweg 29, 1043 NX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Reg. no. 33156677. VAT no. NL 005033019B01.
This email has been sent by Scopus user.
Delivery Job: ID: 0a70df11017a48113:082582205:0a70df11017a48113:058693217   Webuser ID: 11193099   Alert ID: 1773309

April 21, 2017

Scopus Author Citation Alert: “Citations for Barbour, Michael K. (Author Identifier 7005949699)”

A lot of new K-12 distance, online, and blended learning research can be identified from this notice that I received from one of my open scholarship networks.

Select to go to the Scopus main search page
Scopus author citation alert
Citations for Barbour, Michael K. (Author Identifier 7005949699) – 7 new results
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 Interactions and learning outcomes in online language courses Lin C.-H., Zheng B., Zhang Y. 2017 British Journal of Educational Technology,
48(3)pp.730-748.
0
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 Persistence factors revealed: students’ reflections on completing a fully online program Yang D., Baldwin S., Snelson C. 2017 Distance Education,
38(1)pp.23-36.
0
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 Navigating the challenges of delivering secondary school courses by videoconference Rehn N., Maor D., McConney A. 2017 British Journal of Educational Technology,
48(3)pp.802-813.
0
2 Practical guidelines for creating online courses in K-12 education Journell W. 2016 Blended Learning: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications,
4pp.507-529.
0
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 Interactions and learning outcomes in online language courses Lin C.-H., Zheng B., Zhang Y. 2017 British Journal of Educational Technology,
48(3)pp.730-748.
0
2 Practical guidelines for creating online courses in K-12 education Journell W. 2016 Blended Learning: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications,
4pp.507-529.
0
3 Preparing online learning readiness with learner-content interaction: Design for scaffolding self-regulated learning Liu J.C., Kaye E.R. 2016 Blended Learning: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications,
4pp.586-614.
0
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 Interactions and learning outcomes in online language courses Lin C.-H., Zheng B., Zhang Y. 2017 British Journal of Educational Technology,
48(3)pp.730-748.
0
2 Navigating the challenges of delivering secondary school courses by videoconference Rehn N., Maor D., McConney A. 2017 British Journal of Educational Technology,
48(3)pp.802-813.
0
3 Practical guidelines for creating online courses in K-12 education Journell W. 2016 Blended Learning: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications,
4pp.507-529.
0
New document(s) citing
Document title Author(s) Year Source Cited by
1 Learner assessment in blended and online settings Persichitte K.A., Young S., Dousay T.A. 2016 Blended Learning: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications,
4pp.1132-1146.
0
2 Learner assessment in blended and online settings Persichitte K.A., Young S., Dousay T.A. 2016 Revolutionizing K-12 Blended Learning through the i<sup>2</sup>Flex Classroom Model,
pp.88-102.
0
View all new results in Scopus
This alert is based on the following query: “Barbour, Michael K. (Author ID 7005949699)”
The previous alert was sent on 13 Apr 2017
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Copyright © 2017  Elsevier B.V.  , Radarweg 29, 1043 NX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
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August 13, 2012

Academia, Research And Tenure

A colleague of mine, Jon Becker, has posted an entry entitled A little help, please?  In that entry, Jon describes how he is going up for promotion and tenure this coming year, and that the first thing in that process is for three full professors that he has had no professional collaboration with will review his dossier and provide an assessment of him (a process known as external review).

I too will be going up for promotion and tenure in the coming year.  In fact, it has only been this past week that I have finalized the initial materials for my dossier, and those materials should be sent to six external reviewers shortly.  As in Jon’s case, these should be people in my field (i.e., instructional technology), who have knowledge of distance education/online learning – and, ideally, K-12 online learning.  They should also be full professors at similar institutions (i.e., research-extensive based on the Carnegie classifications) and, ideally, at big name universities that would be recognized by academics in any field.  And, of course, people that I have not collaborated with on any kind of project (i.e., writing, research, development, etc.).   For those of you familiar with academics in the field of K-12 online learning, you know that the field is already quite small – and these criteria do make it even smaller.

In Jon’s entry, he asks his blogging audience to respond to several questions and states that it is his intention to include those responses in his promotion and tenure portfolio.  I’m guessing that our materials differ somewhat, as the space requirements I am given for the documents that I must include would not allow me to carry out such an exercise.  However, over the next five months I will try and document some of my own promotion and tenure journey in this space; and also try and provide some of the materials from that journey that I believe relevant to this audience.  I may also try and obtain some feedback – as Jon is doing – that while won’t be an official part of my promotion and tenure dossier, will be of great interest and importance to me personally.

June 23, 2011

“Dr. M.K. Barbour, Your Work Has Been Cited” – OR – Open Access Vs. Closed Access

So earlier today I got the following e-mail:

Online Version

CiteAlert is a  free, unique and automated service to notify authors when their articles are cited.
Dear Dr. M.K. Barbour,It is our pleasure to inform you that your publication has been cited in a journal published by Elsevier.Through this unique service we hope we can offer you valuable information, and make you aware of publications in your research area.Best regards,Author Support

Your article:
The reality of virtual schools: A review of the literature
Barbour, M.K., Reeves, T.C.
Computers and Education
volume 52, issue 2, year 2009, pp. 402 – 416

has been cited in:
cover Classrooms matter: The design of virtual classrooms influences gender disparities in computer science classes
Cheryan, S., Meltzoff, A.N., Kim, S.
Computers and Education
volume 57, issue 2, year 2011, pp. 1825 – 1835

View all citations to your article in SciVerse Scopus

Data Protection Notice:This email has been sent to  mkbarbour@gmail.com from Elsevier S&T Journals,  Elsevier B.V., Registered Office: Radarweg 29, 1043 NX Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Registered in the Netherlands, Reg No. 33156677, BTW No. NL 005033019B01. To ensure delivery to your inbox (not bulk or junk folders), please click hereto add our address to your safe senders list.We have sent to you this email because you are an author of an  article indexed in Elsevier’s SciVerse Scopus database and we believe that this initiative by Elsevier to inform authors and their wider network about relevant citation behaviour, will be of interest to you. If you do not wish to receive CiteAlert emails in the future you can Unsubscribehere.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. | Elsevier Website Privacy Policy | SciVerse is a registered trademark of Elsevier Properties S.A., used under license. Scopus is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V.
What is CiteAlert?A service which automatically notifies authors by email when their work is referenced by a newly published article on SciVerse ScienceDirect.Only when your article has been indexed by SciVerse Scopus, the largest citation database of research literature, will you be eligible to receive a CiteAlert.View your Author Profile in SciVerse ScopusProvide feedback on this service

Frequency of alerts:

Soon after your work has been cited.

Information for authors:

We value our creative partnerships with journal authors. Both the new and seasoned journal author will find helpful information about submission, support, and much more on Authors’ Home.

Please note:

Self-citations are not included.

For questions, please contact Author Support

If you click on the link, it shows you that the following people have cited this article over the past three years using their metric:

1 Classrooms matter: The design of virtual classrooms influences gender disparities in computer science classes Cheryan, S., Meltzoff, A.N., Kim, S. 2011 Computers and Education 57 (2), pp. 1825-1835 0
2 Reimagining schools: The potential of virtual education Searson, M., Monty Jones, W., Wold, K. 2011 British Journal of Educational Technology 42 (3), pp. 363-371 0
3 A comparison of organizational structure and pedagogical approach: Online versus face-to-face McFarlane, D.A. 2011 Journal of Educators Online 8 (1) 0
4 Intention, transition, retention: Examining high school distance e-learners’ participation in post-secondary education Kirby, D., Sharpe, D. 2011 International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education 7 (1), pp. 21-32 0
5 Enhancing online distance education in small rural US schools: A hybrid, learner-centred model De La Varre, C., Keane, J., Irvin, M.J. 2010 ALT-J: Research in Learning Technology 18 (3), pp. 193-205 0
6 Mii school: New 3D technologies applied in education to detect drug abuses and bullying in adolescents Carmona, J.A., Espínola, M., Cangas, A.J., Iribarne, L. 2010 Communications in Computer and Information Science 73 CCIS, pp. 65-72 0
7 Videoconferencing in English schools: One technology, many pedagogies? Lawson, T., Comber, C. 2010 Technology, Pedagogy and Education 19 (3), pp. 315-326 0
8 High school students in the new learning environment: A profile of distance e-learners Kirby, D., Sharpe, D. 2010 Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology 9 (1), pp. 83-88 0
9 Virtual school pedagogy: The instructional practices of K-12 virtual school teachers Dipietro, M. 2010 Journal of Educational Computing Research 42 (3), pp. 327-354 1
10 New capabilities for cyber charter school leadership: An emerging imperative for integrating educational technology and educational leadership knowledge Kowch, E. 2009 TechTrends 53 (4), pp. 41-48 0
11 Pennsylvania cyber school funding: Follow the money Carr-Chellman, A.A., Marsh, R.M. 2009 TechTrends 53 (4), pp. 49-55 0

Now it was only last week that a good friend of mine as visiting me from Brigham Young University and we were playing with the Publish or Perish tool.  For those of you who aren’t familiar with this tool, it essentially uses Google Scholar as a way of indexing and ranking the impact of a particular article.  So, if you run the same article through Publish or Perish you get these results:

Cites Authors Title Year Source Publisher ArticleURL CitesURL
30 MK Barbour & TC Reeves The reality of virtual schools: A review of the literature 2009 Computers & Education Elsevier http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/s0360131508001450 http://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=2300981901871056248&as_sdt=2005&sciodt=0,5&hl=en&num=100

Now one of the things about Publish or Perish is that it doesn’t remove your own self-citations, and if you look at the list of cites on Google Scholar you can remove three of those citations – giving us a total of 27 citations using Publish or Perish.

I describe this issue today for two reasons. The first is that I’ll be honest and say that many of the places where this article has been cited were articles that I am unfamiliar with. So it has been a great way to see some new literature that is being written by folks beyond the usual suspects.

The second reason is because I have been having discussions lately with people about open access publication, and the value of publishing in open access sources to have a greater impact on the community. Now I’m in a unique position – I think – to examine this issue, as I was a co-author on two literature review articles that were both published about the same time in 2009: the one above was in a closed access publication and a second, with Cathy Cavanaugh and Tom Clark, in an open access journal.

Now what I have found interesting is that using the same Publish or Perish tool (as you need a subscription to do your own searches using SciVerse Scopus), you get these results:

Cites Authors Title Year Source Publisher ArticleURL CitesURL
11 CS Cavanaugh, MK Barbour, T Clark Research and practice in K-12 online learning: A review of open access literature 2009 Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning irrodl.org http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/viewArticle/607 http://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=11710282383282485180&as_sdt=2005&sciodt=0,5&hl=en&num=100

Again, if you remove the self-citations from all three authors, you would decrease the number by three, leaving a grand total of 8 citations.

Now this seems counter-intuitive to me… You would think that the open access publication would have a higher ranking than the closed access publication – particularly given the fact that both were published about the same time. I would also expect that using Google Scholar as the database of comparison (as Publish or Perish does) would even out things in favour of the open access publication.

Needless to say that given I will be preparing my promotion and tenure application over the next twelve months, these kinds of issues (e.g., impact and academic reach) are becoming more and more important to me. But I wanted to share these observations this morning and invite my readers to comment…

Specially, I would ask the non-university-based folks if you have ever read either of these two articles? If you have, which one(s) have you read? For the more academic folks (i.e., those university-based or foundation-based researchers), which of these two have you read?

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