Virtual School Meanderings

June 28, 2019

News: Young Teachers May Be ‘Digital Natives’ But Need Support in Using Tech, Studies Find

This showed up in my ASCD SmartBrief earlier in the week.

Research: New teachers need more edtech support

Research: New teachers need more edtech support
(Bertrand Langlois/AFP/Getty Images)
While novice teachers may have grown up using technology as “digital natives,” two new studies discussed at the International Society for Technology in Education conference find they still may need support in using education technology in the classroom. Karla Karr, an assistant professor at Indiana Wesleyan University, says her research found that teacher training on technology did not always align with the skills new teachers need on the job.
Education Week (tiered subscription model) (6/24)

The actual title of the Education Week article was “Young Teachers May Be ‘Digital Natives’ But Need Support in Using Tech, Studies Find.”  The article actually begins:

Millennial teachers may have grown up with Snapchat and iPads, but that doesn’t mean that they feel prepared to enter the classroom ready to integrate technology into their lessons. And it’s not clear if their student-teaching experience helps them make that happen.

That was the upshot of a pair of studies discussed at the International Society for Technology in Education here.

To continue reading, click here.

Now say what you will about me, but when I read this I thought “duh!”  I’ve been driving a car for the past 25 years.  It doesn’t mean I know much about how to fix it when the “Check Engine Light” comes on.  It doesn’t mean that I could run a pit crew over at the Sonoma Raceway.  It doesn’t even mean that I could run a race at the Sonoma Raceway – even if I have tons of experience turning left.

Just because I have used the tool, it doesn’t mean that I can use it in sophisticated ways.  It doesn’t mean that I can explain how to use it to others.  It doesn’t mean that I can use it in ways that will make others better.

I don’t know why anyone believed or believes or needed to confirm that individuals who use tools in a cursory or superficial ways, would somehow have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to be able to use the tools in sophisticated ways to help students learn or to inherently improve their own performance?

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