Virtual School Meanderings

April 30, 2017

AERA 2017 – Parents’ Use of Litigation to Enhance the Experience of Students With Disabilities in Online Schools In Event: Litigation Trends in K–12 Education Relating to Students With Special Needs and School Privatization

The sixth session I’m blogging at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) is:

Parents’ Use of Litigation to Enhance the Experience of Students With Disabilities in Online Schools

  • In Event: Litigation Trends in K–12 Education Relating to Students With Special Needs and School Privatization

Sun, April 30, 8:15 to 9:45am, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Meeting Room Level, Room 217 B

Abstract

Virtual schooling is gaining in popularity in the United States. Parents increasingly view online schooling as a viable option for their children with disabilities as schools promise to deliver individualized, self-paced instruction and provide additional supports either within the home or at regional centers. Parents play an important role in online schooling because most of this form of education is provided in the child’s home over the Internet. This research analyzes the opportunities and trials of virtual schooling for students with disabilities by examining the legal challenges parents have brought surrounding their participation. It identifies common problems and concludes with suggestions for both parents and schools on structuring a successful experience for students with disabilities in virtual learning environments.

Authors

  • Regina R. Umpstead, Central Michigan University
  • Nicole Snyder, Latsha Davis & McKenna
  • Linda Weiss, Central Michigan University

While I have actually made it to AERA, I’m actually chairing a session on Learning From the Federal Market-Based Reforms: Lessons for the Every Student Succeeds Act  – which means I’m not in the room to take notes.  So if you are in this session, please post your notes in the comments below.

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