Virtual School Meanderings

March 8, 2017

SITE 2017 – Analysis of the Features of the Junior and Senior High School Students of Regulated Learning under Asynchronous e-Learning in Japan

The twenty-first – and first for today – session that I am blogging here at SITE 2017 related to K-12 Online and Blended Learning is:

Analysis of the Features of the Junior and Senior High School Students of Regulated Learning under Asynchronous e-Learning in Japan

  1. Takayuki Araki, Musashino University, Japan
  2. Ryo Saito, Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University, Japan
  3. Tatsuya Horita

    Tatsuya HORITA

    Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University
    Sendai-shi, Miyagi, Japan

    , Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University, Japan

Wednesday, March 8 10:15-10:45 AM in Barton View on map

Presider: Sevinj Iskandarova, James Madison University, United States

This study examined the relevance of several factors in junior and senior high school students to work on collaborative learning in the asynchronous e-Learning. In relation with the learning methods, the mutual evaluation activities promote regulated learning. Under this condition, a significant correlation was found between the learning log and their psychological personality. In the learning experience, we found a correlation between the regulated learning and their psychological personality for junior high school students, and between the regulated learning and NFC (the Need For Cognition) for senior high school students. In the Co-Regulated Learning which paired the junior high school and senior high school students, we confirmed there is a significant correlation between the total amount of words used in the learning log of junior high school students and the psychological characteristics, as well as the interaction strategies of paired senior high school students.

ID
50162
Type
Full Paper
Topics
K-12 Online Learning Research & Evaluation

The study was focused on middle and high school because the research has shown that motivation – particularly intrinsic motivation – towards learning decreased in middle school and again in high school.  The study examined the characteristics of self-regulation learning in high school students though data generated from learning logs, as well as the potency and task of regulated learning, as measured by several questionnaires (e.g., IOSRLI, eLearning SRL scale, etc.).

Apparently, there are three types of regulated learning: self-regulated learning, co-regulated learning, and socially shared regulated learning (Zimmerman & Schunk, 2014).  This study focused on the first two types – self-regulated learning and co-regulated learning.

There were 411 grades 9-12 students involved in the study over an eight month period (i.e., November 2015 to June 2016).  Some of the data tools that were used included a learning management system, Google forms, and a printed questionnaire form.

The slides were covered quickly at this stage, so I missed a lot of the content.

 In terms of what was presented, there was a lot of time spent on the Online Self-Regulated Learning Inventory (OSRLI) and the validity of the tool after it was translated into Japanese.  The presenter went through other portions of the questionnaire and the reliability and validity of each.

As for the results…

  • the treatment group experienced a statistically significant relationship for the total number of words used and the knowledge confirmation
  • the OSRLI found a significant, positive correlation between “emotional motivation scale” and “extrovertism”, as well as “emotional motivation scale” and “openness”
  • correlations between the posting frequency and learning log/instructional strategies with middle school students
  • correlations between the posting frequency and learning log/instructional strategies/something else I missed with high school students
  • there was a positive correlation between total number of words uses in middle school and total number of words used and learning log/instructional strategies in high school, but a negative correlation with cognitive needs in high school

Overall, the presenter indicated that the effect of co-regulation was confirmed, as well as paying attention to cognitive needs of interacting partners (i.e., experts – as in the more knowledgeable other, at least that is how I understood it).

I apologize for the somewhat disjointed notes.  I did my best with the text heavy slides, which were dealt with quite quickly, and the heavily accented presenter.  I actually wish this had been a roundtable session, as I think a more interactive format would have allowed the room to get a lot more out of this presentation – as I was quite interested in learning more about the general context of the study.

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