Virtual School Meanderings

January 21, 2009

Follow-Up: Advancing Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal Community

As a follow-up to my earlier post on this topic (see Advancing Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal Community), the link for the recording of this session is:

http://elluminate.nait.ca/play_recording.html?recordingId=1228166497893_1232557306586

Again, this session was:

Title: Advancing Aboriginal Inclusion through the use of E-Learning Technology in the Aboriginal Community
Presenter:  Linda Robinson, Vice-Principal/Registrar, Sunchild E-Learning Community

Abstract: Sunchild E-Learning is a leader in on-line educational delivery to Aboriginal Communities in Canada using technology to advance aboriginal inclusion in higher education and the work force, making a difference in the lives of Aboriginal Students.

Partnering with major oil and gas companies, and Aboriginal Communities, Sunchild E-Learning provides educational opportunities to aboriginal students on reserve and in urban settings, enabling them to complete their High School Diplomas, move onto University and College or Trades, and close the gap that exists between the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in terms of quality of life and opportunity.

6 Comments »

  1. The philosophy of e-learning for aboriginal peoples and communities is quite powerful, due to the positive potential for acquiring an education that combines the best of the home community and the best practices of our common education. As long as the psyche and culture of the aboriginal community is considered whenever developing these programs, I think they have great possibilities to meet their intended goals. Thanks for sharing this project.

    Comment by Sheryl A. McCoy — January 22, 2009 @ 10:24 am | Reply

  2. Sheryl, it was quite an interesting session and I would encourage that you review the recording, along with the video and Conference Board of Canada report linked into the previous entry on this session.

    There are a few other programs like this in Canada that I am aware of. Keewaytinook Internet High School (http://www.kihs.knet.ca/drupal/ ) in Ontario and Credenda Virtual High School (http://www.credenda.net/ ) in Saskatchewan. There may be others too, but these are the three (if you include Sunchild) that have appeared on my radar screen.

    Comment by mkbnl — January 22, 2009 @ 11:55 am | Reply

  3. […] Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal Community and Follow-Up: Advancing Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal… for previous entries on that program).  The third is Keywaytinook Internet High School in Ontario […]

    Pingback by Canadian Virtual School Focused On Aboriginal Students Received $2 Million Donation « Virtual High School Meanderings — February 2, 2010 @ 10:40 am | Reply

  4. […] Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal Community and Follow-Up: Advancing Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal… for previous entries on that program).  The third is Keywaytinook Internet High School in Ontario […]

    Pingback by Canadian Virtual School Focused On Aboriginal Students Receives $2 Million Donation « Virtual High School Meanderings — February 2, 2010 @ 10:41 am | Reply

  5. […] Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal Community and Follow-Up: Advancing Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal…), along with Credenda (see Elluminate Newsline – December 2008 and Canadian Virtual School […]

    Pingback by Report: Optimizing The Effectiveness Of E-Learning For First Nations « Virtual School Meanderings — June 28, 2010 @ 11:40 am | Reply

  6. […] Follow-Up: Advancing Aboriginal Inclusion Through The Use Of E-Learning Technology In The Aboriginal… […]

    Pingback by Aboriginal Focused Programs in Canada « Virtual School Meanderings — January 18, 2011 @ 9:06 am | Reply


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