Virtual School Meanderings

July 8, 2014

CANeLearn 2014: Ontario Summit – What’s The Future Look Like Now That We Are All Online Learners? How Did We Get Here And Where Are We Going?

Canadian E-Learning Network LogoSo today I am attending the CANeLearn 2014: Ontario Summer Summit here in Toronto, which is thematically entitled “Blended and Online Learning in Canada: State of the Nation.” As this is a K-12 online learning event, I want to blog the session (as is my pattern). So the first session was described as:

Opening Keynote
Dr. Bill Muirhead, Associate Provost UOIT

What’s The Future Look Like Now That We Are All Online Learners? How Did We Get Here And Where Are We Going?

The talk will examine the questions that arise both from the history of online learning to the current practices within the k-12 sector. Bill will draw parallels between online learning within the higher education sector with that of K-12, while providing a vision of the many possible futures for learning in the 21st century.

Bill began his talk by talking about his own background in educational technology, and specifically K-12 online learning.  For those that are interested in his scholarship, check him out on Google Scholar.

He then said that he was going to ask, contextualize, and discuss a series of questions that folks in our positions need to figure out.  The questions that he asked of us was:

  • What is the role of information and communication technology in supporting and/or informing a vision for learning?
  • Has the K-12 schooling system changed profoundly or superficially?
  • The power of language to define our reality – do we talk about students, children, learners, young learner, adolescent learner, delayed adulthood learner, adult learner, dependent learner, independent learner, school socialization, family socialization?  How does this change in online learning?
  • Online schooling vs. face-to-face schooling – Why do we speak of these as opposites vs. a continuum?
  • What is “content” for learning and how has it changed?
  • Is online learning for the rich? BYOD vs. school provided devices; Internet at home – at school – everyone; mobility for all, some of for the few?
  • What is interaction?  What has changed in schools or shall I say learning settings?
  • Returning to a vision for online learning…  what has changed and what has remained the same?
  • What do we do now that everyone is learning online?

I didn’t take comprehensive notes on what Bill said about each of these questions, but it was a fascinating listen…

May 9, 2014

HOC-Lab 2014 – Massive Open Online Courses: What K-12 Educators Need to Know

So this afternoon I am delivering a convocation address as a part of the Poliresearch Seminar: MOOCs for the Italian School, PoliCultura and EXPO Milan 2015 for the HOC-LAB, Politecnico di Milano in Milan, Italy.  My slides are below.

May 7, 2014

Congress Is Less Than 3 Weeks Away: Register Today! | Le Congrès est à moins de trois semaines : Inscrivez-vous aujourd’hui !

Also from Tuesday’s inbox…

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Congress is less than 3 weeks away!

Registrations for Congress 2014 have already surpassed 6,000! Connect with your Association and come and be part of this extraordinary gathering of scholars, policy-makers and stakeholders in the world-famous Niagara Region.

Accommodations and a convenient shuttle service during Congress

Brock University and the many hotels in the greater St. Catharines area are all looking forward to hosting you during Congress 2014 at one of the many on or off-campus accommodations.

 

Brock University will be providing a daily bus shuttle to and from campus and all the hotels affiliated with Congress in St. Catharines and Niagara Falls. The shuttle service costs $5 per trip and will run in 30 minute intervals.

 

For more details about planning your trip, including accommodations and the shuttle service, check out the Plan Your Trip section of our site.

A great line-up of special programming

Congress offers a range of academic, professional and cultural programming to enrich your experience. These events include those that are open to the public, as well as to all registered attendees.

Be sure to visit the online Calendar of Events for exciting programming brought to you by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Brock University, Associations and our Congress partners. Highlights include:

#congressh

 

The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences works to promote the value of research and learning in the humanities and social sciences. Created in 1996, its membership comprises over 80 scholarly associations, 79 institutions and six affiliate organizations, representing 85,000 researchers, educators and students across Canada.

 

With seven faculties, 18,000 full-time students, 13 Canada Research Chairs and nearly 600 professors, Brock is buzzing with activity and welcoming visitors to the St. Catharines campus every day. The university, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014, is one of only a handful of Canadian universities located in a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

Le Congrès est à moins de trois semaines ! 
Le nombre d’inscriptions au Congrès 2014 a déjà dépassé les
6 000 ! Nouez des liens avec votre association et joignez-vous à ce rassemblement extraordinaire de chercheurs, des responsables des politiques et des intervenants dans la région de Niagara de renommée mondiale.

Inscrivez-vous aujourd’hui !

L’hébergement et un service de navette pratique pendant le Congrès 

La Brock University et les nombreux hôtels de la grande région de St. Catharines attendent avec impatience de vous accueillir à l’un des nombreux hébergements sur le campus ou hors campus.

La Brock University mettra à la disposition une navette quotidienne d’aller et retour entre le campus et les hôtels affiliés au Congrès situés à St. Catharines et à Niagara Falls. Le service de navette coute 5 $ par trajet et s’arrêtera toutes les 30 minutes.

Pour plus de détails sur la planification de votre voyage, y compris l’hébergement et le service de navette, consultez la section Planifiez votre voyage sur notre site.

Un programme riche est diversifié 

Le Congrès propose une programmation universitaire, professionnelle et culturelle variée et des plus enrichissantes. Ces événements sont ouverts à tous les congressistes et quelques-uns le sont au grand public.

Visitez régulièrement le calendrier des événements pour découvrir un programme riche et diversifié présenté par la Fédération des sciences humaines, la Brock University, les Associations et nos partenaires du Congrès. Les événements spéciaux incluent :

Le Congrès des sciences humaines 2014 est une initiative de la Fédération des sciences humaines présentée par la Brock University.

#congressh

La Fédération des sciences humaines œuvre à la mise en valeur de la recherche et de l’érudition dans ces disciplines. Créée en 1996, elle compte au nombre de ses adhérents plus que 80 associations savantes, 79 institutions et six sociétés affiliées représentant quelques 85 000 chercheurs, membres du corps enseignant et étudiants au Canada.

Comptant sept facultés, 18 000 étudiants à temps plein, 13 chaires de recherche du Canada et quelque 600 professeurs, la Brock University bourdonne d’activités et accueille tous les jours les visiteurs sur le campus de St. Catharines. L’université, qui célèbre son 50e anniversaire de la fondation en 2014, fait partie des quelques universités canadiennes désignées Réserve de biosphère par l’UNESCO.

Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences | 275 Bank Street | Suite 300 | Ottawa | Ontario | K2P 2L6 | Canada

April 7, 2014

AERA 2014 – Examining Variation in Achievement Impacts Across California’s Full-Time Virtual Schools

This is the twenty-fourth session – and final one for Monday (and the conference) – that I am blogging from the 2014 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) in Philadelphia.  This session was a part of a symposium that was described as:

Virtual Schools in the United States 2014: Politics, Performance, Policy, and Research Evidence

In the past decade, virtual education has moved quickly to the top of the K-12 public education reform agenda. Though little is known about the efficacy of online education generally or about individual approaches specifically, states are moving quickly to expand taxpayer-funded virtual education programs. The main purpose of this session is to understand the specificities of today’s virtual school movement as it moves from novelty to mainstream. Drawing from a rich array of theoretical perspectives and content disciplines, we will examine the performance of full-time, publicly funded K-12 virtual schools, describe the policy issues raised by the available evidence, assess the research evidence that bears on K-12 virtual teaching and learning, and offer research-based recommendations to help guide policymaking.

The actual session is described in the online program as:

Examining Variation in Achievement Impacts Across California’s Full-Time Virtual Schools
Charisse Atibagos Gulosino, University of Memphis; Jonah Liebert, Teachers College, Columbia University

Perhaps the most significant current trend in education reform is the growth of virtual (online) schools (Watson et al., 2011, 2012). While these schools offer the potential to radically restructure the way that teaching and learning happens, they also present challenges for researchers and policymakers who want to know whether they work. Specifically, the extent to which virtual schools depart from traditional brick-and-mortar schools creates difficulties with respect to assessing what these schools are doing in terms of teaching and learning and how well they are doing it.

This study uses longitudinal student-level data covering all full-time virtual schools (thirty-two total) in California from 2010-2012 to study the effect of virtual schools on student performance. Based on our web-based research, all full-time virtual schools in California are contracted to run as charter schools. Full-time virtual schools are defined as those schools in which instruction is delivered entirely or primarily through online methods (Watson et al., 2012). However, students self-select into virtual schools, making it difficult to estimate the effects of these schools on achievement. This study addresses this challenge using propensity score matching (PSM). Following the counterfactual framework (Rosenbaum & Rubin 1983; Rubin 1974), PSM matches virtual school students (“treatment” group) to those who are non-virtual school students but similar in all other preexisting observed characteristics (“control” group), based on a propensity to attend a full-time virtual school. In addition, this study addresses selection bias due to both observed and unobserved covariates. Previous studies employing the PSM approach have focused mainly on selection bias due to observed covariates (Chevalier & Viitanen, 2003). Using the Rosenbaum bounds method (Rosenbaum 2002), we evaluate the extent to which selection bias on unobserved covariates would nullify propensity score matching estimates of the effects of virtual schools.

The data for this study come from the California Department of Education (CDOE). The Department maintains longitudinal records on all public school teachers and students, including test scores (CALPADS), demographic data, enrollment and attendance information. This study supports our larger project’s focus on heterogeneity in the achievement effects of charter school attendance across demographic groups in California. We focus on the difference in impact between virtual school students and non-virtual school students in our sample, primarily because of the finding of large positive impacts in urban charters and non-significant or negative impacts in non-urban charters has been noted in our prior analysis.

Although virtual schooling is gaining ground in the K-12 classroom (Molnar et al., 2013), its impact on academic performance remains largely unexplored. Considered one of the largest markets of virtual school programs in the United States, California offers a fertile context for the study of virtual school impacts and thus serves as the focus of our study. Ultimately, our study focuses on discovering which policy-amenable aspects of virtual schools—their characteristics and conditions— are related to their ability to maximize student learning and close the achievement gap.

While a part of our symposium, this portion was not part of the National Education Policy Center’s report Virtual Schools in the U.S. 2014: Politics, Performance, Policy, and Research Evidence.

This was a difficult one for me to follow, as it was highly statistical.  The other difficulty was that the presenter was not able to present the results.  Basically, the California Department of Education has indicated that they are unable to verify the data that Charisse and her team have collected – even though the data has come from the California DoE’s own website – they have forbidden her from presenting the data (something I was led to believe came about after she submitted her AERA proposal).  She – and others in the room – were hopeful that this might be worked out at some stage.

Some notes that I was able to capture.  Her data was from the 2010-11 school year to the 2012-13 school year.  It used a PMS feeder school model to address selection bias (a technique commonly used by CREDO in their studies of charter schools and cyber charters).  She used a multivariate analysis strategies, that had three matching procedures, as a way to try and compare apples to apples.  That’s about all I was able to get from the procedure – and, as I mentioned, she was unable to present the actual data.

A couple of resources that she did mention that helped inform her work included:

Cassandra Guarino, Ron Zimmer, Cathy Krop, and Derrick Chau. Nonclassroom-based Charter Schools in California and the Impact of SB 740. RAND: MG-323-EDU, February 2005.

Ron Zimmer , Richard Buddin, Derrick Chau, Brian Gill, Cassie Guarino, Laura Hamilton, Cathy Krop, Dan McCaffrey, Melinda Sandler, and Dominic Brewer. Charter School Operation and Performance: Evidence from California. RAND: MR-1700, July 2003.

So I wanted to share those as well.

This is me officially signing off from AERA 2014…

AERA 2014 – What Do We Actually Know? Examining the Research Into Virtual Schools for Useful Models

This is the twenty-third session that I am blogging from the 2014 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) in Philadelphia.  This session was a part of a symposium that was described as:

Virtual Schools in the United States 2014: Politics, Performance, Policy, and Research Evidence

In the past decade, virtual education has moved quickly to the top of the K-12 public education reform agenda. Though little is known about the efficacy of online education generally or about individual approaches specifically, states are moving quickly to expand taxpayer-funded virtual education programs. The main purpose of this session is to understand the specificities of today’s virtual school movement as it moves from novelty to mainstream. Drawing from a rich array of theoretical perspectives and content disciplines, we will examine the performance of full-time, publicly funded K-12 virtual schools, describe the policy issues raised by the available evidence, assess the research evidence that bears on K-12 virtual teaching and learning, and offer research-based recommendations to help guide policymaking.

The actual session is described in the online program as:

What Do We Actually Know? Examining the Research Into Virtual Schools for Useful Models
Michael Kristopher Barbour, Sacred Heart University

The purpose of this systematic review of the literature is to identify trends in the research regarding K-12 online learning related to the delivery of virtual schooling.

While the use of K-12 online learning at the K-12 level has been practiced for approximately two decades, the availability of published research to inform that practice has not kept pace. Barbour (2011) reviewed 262 articles from the main distance education from 2005 to 2009, only 24 articles related to K-12 distance education. Further, Cavanaugh et al. (2009) stated that the literature was “based upon the personal experiences of those involved in the practice of virtual schooling” (p. 5). Finally, Rice (2006) lamented that “a paucity of research exists when examining high school students enrolled in virtual schools, and the research base is smaller still when the population of students is further narrowed to the elementary grades” (p. 430).

There is general agreement about the themes that have been dominant in the limited amount of research conducted on K-12 online learning to date. Rice (2006) described the research into K-12 online learning as either being comparisons of student performance between those enrolled in online and face-to-face environments or examinations of the qualities and characteristics of the online learning experience. An examination of the findings related to comparison of student performance in K-12 online learning environments and the traditional classroom has been mixed (Cavanaugh et al., 2004; Means et al., 2009). Further, Cavanaugh et al. (2005) speculated virtual school students took their assessment were more academically motivated and naturally higher achieving students.

There is no shortage of issues within the realm of K-12 online learning that need to be examined. For example, Cavanaugh et al. (2009) recommended researchers establish best practices for online teaching, improve the identification and remediation of factors related to success for online learners, investigate the nature of support provided to online learners by how school-based teachers. However, Barbour and Reeves (2009) went even further on how future research should be conducted, recommending a design-based research approach.

To date, the only exception to this pattern is the Virtual High School (VHS). SRI International, based upon seven goals identified in conjunction with their VHS partners, conducted several annual evaluations, content-specific investigations in focus areas where VHS was not meeting their initial goals, and a final evaluation. VHS were full participants in this research process: assisting in the identification of issues to be examined, the design of the research, the implementation of the recommendations, and then beginning the process again to ensure that recommendations actually addressed the original problem. This cyclical research process that the VHS and SRI International engaged in was able to resolve many of the initial issues in the implementation of what was then a new model of educational delivery. The findings from this design research approach should form the starting point for additional research into similar K-12 online learning settings.

For those that aren’t aware, this session was based on the National Education Policy Center’s report Virtual Schools in the U.S. 2014: Politics, Performance, Policy, and Research Evidence, and my section was Section II.

Since this was a session that I am involved in, I’ll just post the slides below.

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