Virtual School Meanderings

July 20, 2013

New Book: Private Enterprise And Public Education

This is turning into a neo-liberal kind of day…

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Can you be for-profit and for students? 

 

In their new book Private Enterprise and Public Education, Michael B. Horn of the Clayton Christensen Institute and Frederick M. Hess of the American Enterprise Institute facilitate a thoughtful discussion among education leaders on how for-profit education providers can promote quality and cost-effectiveness at scale.

 

The contributors note that for-profits have unique strengths, including the ability to move more nimbly, readily attract capital and talent, and scale more rapidly. But they are not without their weaknesses. For-profits may also be less rooted in community institutions, less stable, and more willing to cut services or personnel.

 

Horn and Hess conclude that, given sensible policies and quality control mechanisms, policymakers can leverage the power of for-profit innovation and investment to better serve students.

 

Tune In!

Join us for a Google+ Hangout discussion about how policymakers can create an environment where the power of for-profit innovation and investment is leveraged to better serve students.

 

When: July 24 at 11 a.m. PT

 

Panelists:

Michael B. Horn, Clayton Christensen Institute

Frederick M. Hess, AEI

John Bailey, Digital Learning Now

Andrew P. Kelly, AEI

 

RSVP to watch this Google+ Hangout ►

 

Do you have a question you’d like the panelists to address? Leave it in the comments section on Google+ ►

 

Registration is not required. 


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Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation
2929 Campus Drive
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San Mateo, California 94403-2537
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