Virtual School Meanderings

April 14, 2012

AERA 2012 – Effects Of Kentucky Virtual Schools’ Hybrid Program For Algebra I On Math Achievement: Final Report

The fourth K-12 online learning session at the 2012 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association from 13-17 April 2012 in Vancouver, British Columbia that I am blogging.

Effects of Kentucky Virtual Schools’ Hybrid Program for Algebra I on Math Achievement: Final Report
Building/Room: Vancouver Convention Centre, First Level – East Ballroom B
In Session: Mathematics Curriculum and Instructional Practice
Presenters/Authors: Linda Cavalluzzo (CNA Education), Deborah Lowther (The University of Memphis), Christine Mokher (CNA), Xitao Fan (University of Macau)
Abstract: This study quantifies the effectiveness of an intervention that combines online instruction with face-to-face classroom teaching to increase student achievement in grade 9 Algebra I. The Kentucky-based RCT uses a two-cohort sample of 47 high schools (24 treatment and 23 control) to generate a randomized sample that comprises almost 7,000 students from mostly rural schools. The study uses two-level hierarchical models to assess differences in outcomes between the treatment and control schools. The first outcome measure is students’ scores on the pre-algebra/algebra portion of the PLAN test and the second is students’ subsequent math course enrollment in the post-intervention year. The analysis also examines how the impact of the hybrid program varies by gender and school locale.

This was another poster session, which means more images.

Click on any of these to enlarge them.

I suspect you can’t pick much out on the full poster image, so here are the pieces.

Note that the written results of this study are available at http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?projectID=8

2 Comments »

  1. According to the CNA Analysis and Solutions news release about this report, there are some very significant limitations to this study that indicate the treatment sample was seriously compromised. That raises questions about the validity of the findings.

    Was any of this discussed at the AERA?

    Comment by Richard Innes — April 16, 2012 @ 7:02 pm | Reply

    • Richard, not that I asked. This was a poster session, so most folks only interacted with the presenters for a few minutes at a time. I can say that I just chatted with Linda a bit catching up, as we have both known of each other for some time (or at least I have known of her for some time), but had never met in person.

      Comment by mkbnl — April 16, 2012 @ 7:43 pm | Reply


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